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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

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'Trii»<Tr I— ii« urn — 




^DULUTH EVENING HERALD 



TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR. 



LAST EDIT10I9 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



28 Pages 



TWO CENTS. 



THIRTY ARE KILLED 
IN STORM IN THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH 



Fifteen of the Victims Lose 

Lives Near Battlefield 

of Shiloh. 



Iowa Monument in Cemetery 

Wrecked— Damage Amounts 

to Thousands. 

Tennessee, Alabama and Geor- 
gia Suffer-Hail Big as 
Oranges. 



Memphis. Tenn., Oct. 15.— Death and 
destruction were left In the wake of 
the storm which passed over the na- 
tional cemetery of the battlefield of 
Bhiloh at Ilamturg. Tenn.. last night, 
altogether thirty deaths have been re- 
reported. 

Fifteen people were killed at Ham- 
burg and many more were seriously 
Injured. Two guests at the Pittsburg 
Landing hotel are among those killed. 

The storm struck Hamburg hotel, 
leveling stores and dwellings, uproot- 
ing trees and playing havoc with 
vegetation of all kinds. Teleplione and 
telegraph poles were blown down 
wholesale. 

The liotel and a large store house at 
Pittsburg Landing, on the Tennessee 
river, a few miles from Hamburg, were 
destroved. 

town Monument Wrecked. 

The most serious damage done In 
the national cemetery was the wreck- 
ing of tiie Iowa state monument, which 
was blown from its pedestal. The su- 
peritendents quarters were de.<troyed. 
Thirteen More Reported Dead. 

Thirteen more lives are reported lost 
at Stantonville, McNairy ci.unty. but 
ihls report has not been verirted. Tele- 
graph and telephone service, which 
was completelv interrupted last nigiit, 
is badlv crippled, and reports have noi 
aa vet "been received from aii districts. 
It is believed that the total death list 
will run far over the number now 
known dead. 

The propertv damage is exceptionally 
heavv. as dwellings and storehouses 
In ihe path of the storm were blown 
about like so much kindling wood. Ac- 
companving liail and rain did heavy 
damage to crops and vegetation. 

In the Sliiloh National cemetery giant 
forest trees were uprooted and now 
measure their length upon the ground. 

Belated dispatches reaching Mem- 
phis confirm previous reports as 
to loss of life. personal injury 
and property damage resulting from 
the storm of wind, rain and hail 
which swept through North Alabama 
and Middle and West Tennessee last 
night. The casualties, as far as known, 
are eighteen killed and approximately 
a score Injured. As to the monetary 
loss an accurate estimate is as yet 
Impossible because of the interruption 
of wire communication. 

Fire rollo\«ii »>torm. 

Denmark, in Madison county. Tenn., 
probablv suffered most. This little city 
was practically wiped from the map, 

(Continued on page 16. 7th column.) 




PASSES THE 
$900MARK 

Governor Johnson Memorial 

Fund in Duluth Shows 

Steady Growth. 

Only Two Weeks More to 

Raise the Desired 

Amount. 



UNCLE SAM HAS {CROWDED SKI 



[\8T0R»CKl. 



POWER TO MAKE 
DULUTH GO "DRY" 



The Johnson Memorial Fund today 
stands as follows: 

Previously acknowledged $862.60 

Received up to noon today. . . . 38.00 

Total to date $900.60 



NEW AHACK 
ON '^TEM" 

La Follette Writes on die 

Missouri Rate R<isolution 

and Its Fate. 



SIVA MPS Wi 



CROSSING SLIP 



CARDINAL MERRY DEL VAL, 
Papal Secretary of State. 



FEAR MOB AT 
THE VATICAN 

Cardinal Merry Del Val Gives 

Special Orders to Guard 

All Entrances. 



Rome, Oct. 15. — The general strike 
continued unabated today by the direc- 
tion of Ferrer sympat.'iizers. Even the 
Radical Republican and Socialist news- 
papers were unable to get out their 
editions. 

Nearly 20,000 workmen ht^Id an im- 
posing meeting-, v.-ilch was presided 
over by the Republican deputy, Mazza. 
Inllamalory speeches denouncing the 
execution of Ferrer were made. the 
speakers including tlie Republican 
deputy. Earzalia, and the Socialist dep- 
uty, Morgarl. 

AccuHeM the Church. 

The latter assailed Spanish reactlm- 
ism. and also attacked the VatiCin, 
which, he said, "through its clergy 
thr<,ughoat the world, represents anti- 
liberalism and anti-progress." 

Several Italians, who have acted as 
Spanish consuls, have resigned in sym- 
pathy with tlie Ferrer movement. 

Notwithstanding the extraordinary 



This was another good day for the 
fund for the Governor Johnson memor- 
ial. Thirty-eight contributions were 
rcce.ved, and not one was less than %1. 
The result Is that the fund received 
by The Herald has passed $900, and 
earlv in the coming week it should 
reach $1,000. The contributions come 
from all parts of No rthern Minnesota 

(Continued on page 16, sixth column) 

ARGUMENTS FOR 
HASKELL BEGUN 



Says Big Interests Got the 

Matter Buried in the 

Senate. 



Ruling of Judge Morris Bears 

Out Claims of Civic 

League. 

Northern Minnesota, Wiscon- 
sin and Michigan Still 
Indian Land. 

Claimed That Federal Officers 

Have Right to Close 

Saloons. 



HIS RULING MAY HELP 
MAKE DULUTH "DRY" 



Son of Accused Governor 

Urges Quashing of the 

Indictments. 

Ardmore, Okla., Oct. 15.— Final ar- 
guments on the motion to quash three 
indictments charging Governor Has- 
kell and other Oklahomans with 
fraudulently scheduling Muskogee 
town lots, began today with Norman 
Haskell, son of Governor Haskell, 
speaking for the defense, followed by 
District Attorney Greeg for the state. 



Madison, Wis., Oct. 1£. — <^eclal to 

The Herald.)— Senator ' L»^ Follettes 
Magazine this week. In the leading 
editorial, vigorously attacks the ".sys- 
tem" in its efforts to prevent the state 
of Missouri from enforcing its state 
railway regulation law. ' 

".Missouri is still not able to get her 
transportation services for -a reason- 
able rate," says Editor La Follette. 
"The laws, state and federal, contem- 
plate that 'common carriers must per- 
form their public serviC'?s for reason- 
able compensation,' but tliey 'charge 
all the traffic will bear," and Missouri 
knows this," declares fhf editor. 

"These rales were attacked In the 
federal courts by some eighteen rail- 
roads, and the law quoted was enjoined 
from going into effect on a showing 
made by the railroads that the rates 
would not yield them a reasonable 
profit." 

The lailroada were able to show, to 
the satisfaction of the court, that they 
were losing money or .their local or 
slate bu.siness in Missouri, and made 
tiitlr enormous profits on their inter- 
state traffic in that state. 

How the Senate Acted. 

This caused the legislature and Gov 



If the provisions of the treaties of 
Sept. 30, 1854, and Feb. 22, 1855, between 
the Chippewa Indians and the United 
Stages government are enforced, the 
manufacture, use of and traffic In in- 
toxicating liquors may be absolutely 
abolished in Northern Minnesota, 
Northern Wisconsin and Northern Micli- 
igan. 

The Civic League of Duluth has been 
preparing a nice, noisy bomb for the 
liquor Interests of the northern part of 
the three states. The activities of the 
federal officers in the western part of 
Northern Minnesota probably furnished 
the inspiration and also gave color to 
the claim that the Federal government 
may abolish the breweries and saloons 
in Duluth, Superior, the range towns 
and all other municipalities in North- 
ern Minnesota, Northern Wisconsin and 
Northern Michigan, as they have in 
Cass Lake and other towns in the 
western part of the state. 

For the present, the officers of the 
Civic league have nothing to say. but 
that they have been in correspond- 
ence and consultation with the offi- 
cials of the bureau of Indian affairs of 
the department of the interior, and they 
have establhslied Ijeyond a doubt, they 
claim, the fact that article 7 of the 



. ■ • * V 








■^i 

^Hr 





Sixteen Dock Laborers Are 

Plunged in the Icy 

Water. 



Two of Them Believed to 

Have Lost Their 

Lives. 



Life Savers Drag Slip, But 

Fail to Recover 

Bodies. 



(Continued on page 14. first column.) cContinued on page 14. second column.) 



mfED^TES STEEL AND THE 

INTERESTS IN GREAT BRITAIN 



(Continued on page 16, fifth column.) 



WILL RETURN BALANCE 
TO THE CONTRIBUTORS 



More Than One-Third of Chis- 

holm Refief Fund 

Unspent 

Commission Completes Its 

Work and Presents 

Final Report. 

The state relief commission appoint- 
ed by the late Governor Johnson to 
handle funds for the aid of the Chis- 
holm fire sufferers a year ago last 
September, wound up its affairs last 
nlgiit at a final meeting, held In the 

mavor's office. 

Upon resolution, and without much 
discussion, the committee voted to re- 
turn the balance of the fund, $34. 362. 4a. 
to the donors upon a pro rata basis. 
This will entail considerable work, but 
»t was tlic opinion of the committee 
that this was the best policy that could 
be adopted. . , ^ ,, . 

The total amount received for reller 
purposes was $82,835.64, and the total 
disbursements were $48,473.19. Chis- 
holm received $41,6 94. 68. the north 

(Continued on page 16, sixth column.) 

COUNTERFEITERS 
IN WASHINGTON 

Bad Quarters and Dimes Are 

in Circulation at the 

CapitaL 

Washington. Oct. 15. — Counterfeiters 
working alniost in the shadow of the 
treasury have invaded certain districts 
of Washington with spurious coins. 
The counterfeits are of 25 and 10-cent 
coins patterned after the issue of 1908, 
but according to the secret service 
operatives thev are poor imitations. 
Chief Operator George F. Protector "has 
taken personal charge of the investi- 
gation and a number of operatives are 
aeeking the source of the coinage. 



ARMY NOT 
UPTOGRADE 

Inspector General Makes An- 
nual Report on Its 
Condition. 



Written for The Kvening Herald by 
Zach McGhec. 

(Copyright 1009, by Zach McGhee.) 
London. Oct. 2.— If the American 
Steel trust has not succeeded in taking 
into complete alliance the principal 
steel manufacturers of Britain, those 
Independent manufacturers here who 
buy and use steel billets and the buy- 
ers of steel rails have reason to believe 
that the Steel trust in America has an 
agreement with the British Steel asso- 
ciation. The basis of this agreement 
seems to be that the Steel trust will 
leave the British market alone, in re- 
turn for which the British 'will let go 



to the American tru»t the South Afri- 
can market. ,, , 

For some years, as was well known 
throughout America, the Steel trust 
was selling its product here consider- 
ably cheaper than at Jiome. They sold 
steel ralln, for instance, for which they 
charged $28 a ton at hame, at $20 or 
$22 a ton hei-e. Recently, it appears, 
they nave raised the price to the Brit- 
ish consumer, if not quite as high as 
•that charged in Americr, at least high 
enough to be practically on a plane 
with that of the British concerns. 
TryluK to Buy. 

The Glasgow tramway committee, 
which in the extension oi its lines uses 
a good many rails, has recently found 
the American Steel con^panies exceed- 
ingly indifferent to the sale of rails, a 
thing most surprising in view of the 
former strenuous activity of the Amer- 



ican campanJes for the British busi- 
ness. , ... 

What IS true of the steel rails is 
true of steel billets. 

"Four years ago, had I gone to the 
office of tht United States St«l cor- 
poration at Pittsburg with the money 
In my pocket ready to pay for steel 
billets, I could not have gotten a billet 
or a million for one half a cent less 
than $30 a ton," said a large user of 
steel billets to me in Scotland tne 
other day. "Yet," ho added, "at that 
same time I bought the same billets 
laid down at our factory for $26 a ton. 
Tlie freight from Pittsburg to New 
York is $3 a ton, from New York to 
Glasgow $2.50, and from Glasgow to 
our factory 50 cents; so that they were 
selling us billets at $20 f. o. b. Pitts- 



JUDGE PAGE MORRIS. 

TAFT IS HEADED 
FOR EL PASO, TEX. 

Stops in New Mexico Long 

Enough to Talk on Single 

Statehood. . 

Flagstaff, Ariz., Oct. 15. — President 
Taft today was speeding toward El 
Paso, where tomorrow he will meel 
President Diaz of Mexico, going later 
to .Juarez to return the call, and mak- 
ing his second trip into Mexico in llic 
evening; to be the guest of President 
Diaz at a fjtat.j banQuet. 

The president's travels today lead 
him tut of Arizona, where he has spent 
Lwi. and a iialf days, into New Mexico, 
where he will carry to the people of 
that territory his message of sympathy 
in their struggle for statehood and his 
pledge to do what he can to see that 
statehood is granted. In accordance 
with the promise of the Republican na- 
tional platform. 

At La Guna. in New Mexico, this aft- 
ernoon, the president stopped for half 
an hour to witness a dance by a band 
of Pueblo Indians. He wiil arrive in 
Albuquerque shortly after 5 o'clock, to 
remain until midnight, when the Jour- 
ney to El I'aso will be resumed. 



»»»;K) t c»»»*») l c*»»»* »» »* » »*)i-* »JM^^tHNH|fjMHtH^^^ 



(Continued on page 16, first column) 



^}MHNf**^MHMf*^!^)Me?:-^!HNHMHMt 



HE WALKED RIGHT IN AND TURNED AROUND, AND HE WALKED 

RIGHT OUT AiQAlN 



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Says It Is Too Small and 

That Defects Are 40 

Per Cent larger. 



Washington, Oct. 15. — Treating prac- 
tically of every branch of the army, 
the annual report of Inspector-General 
E. A. Garlington, made pulilic today, 
is devoted to careful comment on ex- 
isting conditions, some of which are 
criticised and others commended. 

Generally speaking, the belief is ex- 
pressed that the army is greatly In 
need of increase in the infantry and 
field artillery and of reorganization of 
the cavalry and the opinion is ad- 
vanced that legislation to tills end 
would no doubt be facilitated by 
quartering the troops wliere they 
would come closely In contact wltli tiie 
people. 

There was an Increase of about 40 per 
oent in defects, Irregularities and de- 
ficiencies reported per post during the 
last vpar. 

AbMence of Officers. 

Gen. Garlington presents the prob- 
lem of absenteeism of officers from 
their command, tiiere being general 
complaint from all directions, it is said, 
that the service is more or less crippled 
by this practice. 

Gen. Garlington declares It should be 
determined whether the valuable serv- 
ices returned the government by offi- 
cers on certain lines of detached duty 
compensate for the loss of efficiency In 
their own organizations, due to their 
absence, and for the discontent of the 
officers who have to perform the extra 
duty without extra pay, while those 
absent frequently receive extra emolu- 
ment. 




Sixteen dock laborers, anxious to get 
acro«s the slip at the foot of Elleventh 
avenue west and to their work, piled 
into a 14-fooi, flat-bottomed boat thi» 
morning, and when the overladen 
craft was a few feet from the dock It 
sank under its human cargo. Two of 
the sixteen men are believed to hav« 
lost their lives in their attempts to re- 
gain the shore. 

The names o{ the dead are not 
known, and there is some doubt as to 
whether one man was drowned or two, 
but tlie general opinion of tliose who 
saw the accident or had a part in li is 
that two men failed to come up again. 

Members of the life-saving crew are 
dragging the slip for the bodies, 

Tlie dock crews are recruited from 
po many sources, and the confusion in- 
cidental to getting to work each day la 
so great, no one could tell, after the 
accident, who were saved and who were 
drowned. 

Many of the men in the boat did not 
know the names of their fellow-pas- 
sengers, and ail of them went to tnelr 
homes after they had been rescued, so 

(Continued ox page 3, fourth column) 

MISSING MAN 
IS FOUND DEAD 



Cloquet, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — After having been miss- 
ing from home for almost a week, 
Erlck N. Anderson, a farmer, living 
north of here, was found dead by hi» 
son, yesterday afternoon, in a pasture 
about a mile from home. When found, 
two large bottles of liquor were dis- 
covered in his clotlies, indicating that 
death was due to alcoholism. The con- 
dition of the body showed that it had 
been exposed to the elements for four 
or five days. 

Anderson has lived In this vicinnty 
for some length of time, and was well 
known here and In the surrounding- 
farming district. He leaves a wife and 
son. He was (iO. 



DULUTH PEOPLE THEIR 

POOREST CUSTOMERS 




Knudsen & Ferguson Sell Big 

Tract to Eastern 

Syndicate. 

Bitter Root Valley Company 
Agents Dispose of Thous- 
and Acres. 



Local Manufacturers 
'Tatronize Home Industry" 
Cry Is Timely. 

Consumers Apparently Give 

Outside Manufacturers 

the Preference. 



The sale of 1,000 acres of land in the 
Bitter Root valley of Montana to an 
Eastern syndicate has Just been made 
by Knudsen & Ferguson of Duluth, 

The price which the Easterners paid 
for the land was $250 an acre, making 
the cost to them of the entire tract, 
$:i50,000. 

When seen at his office this morning, 
H. B. Knudsen of the firm of Knudsen 
& Ferguson confirmed the report of the 
deal he and his partner, E. M. Fergu- 
son, had closed, and stated that the 
price was that given above. 

This is one of the largest deals in 
Bitter Root land since the valley was 
irrigated, at a large cost, by the Bit- 
ter Root Valley Irrigation Company of 

The^l'and just sold was owned by the 
irrigation company, the Duluth men 
acting as agents for the concern, winch 
having developed the Irrigation project 
there, is most heavily interested in the 

^Hl'lien the valley was first Irrigated 
the^ land was sold at about JlOO an 
Icre. and many Duluthians bougnt 
there at that price and at various ttg- 
urls all the way to $200 an acre. Ttie 
tract just sold through Knudsen & 
Ferguson, however, brought the blg- 
ee«t price that has yet been paid for 
holdings in the now famous valle.v. 
Mr Knudsen figures that at tlie price 
of $"50 the Irrigation company cleared 
a profit exceeding $100 an acre on the 
df-a He says the first sales made by 
the concern, at $100 an acre, were not 
profitable to the company owing to the 
laree expenditures which had been 
made In Irrigating the land. 

Mr Kntftlsen and his partner both 
have" extensive individual holdings in 
the valley. 



Duluth will become a city In spite of 
itself, is tiie sentiment expressed by 
local manufacturers and jobbers. 

They declare, in most emphatic terms., 
that heme industries are not receivings 
Duiuth support, claiming that they 
owe their growth to patronage fronv 
tlie outside. 

They state that they could not exist 
If they had to rely upon Duluth people- 
to use their products. Of a dozen mei» 
interviewed by The Herald thus far, not 
one manufacturer has been found who- 
didn't voice the same complaint. They 
unite in declaring that they do far more- 
business In the foreign field than they 
do at home. 

feome are bitter In their denunciation, 
of present conditions In Duluth. Other* 

(Continued on page 14. third column. > 

RICH CLEVELAND 
MAN IS MISSING 



Howard F. Conger May Have 

Fallen Overboard From 

Steamer. 

New York, Oct. 15. — Since Howard F". 
Conger, son of Col. J. W. Conger, one of 
the wealthiest residents of Cleveland, 
boarded a Metropolitan line steamer 
In Boston last Monday niglit for New- 
York, nothing has been seen of him. 
Todav the police were asked to help 
find "the missing man. 

Mr. Conger was 31 years old and 
unmarried. He was in the auto- 
mobile suoplv business here. His fam- 
ily fears that he fell overboard dur- 
ing the trip from Boston, and wa» 
drowned. 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 






"Fletcherize 
This" 

Here is something we want you to 
digest thoroughly before you buy 

your fall suit or overcoat or both. The brainy, alert, keen minded sub- 
stantial business and professional men and young men are the ones who 
are taking most rapidly to our popular priced lines of clothes at fifteen, 
twenty and twenty-five dollars. Mind you, the very men who could af- 
ford to pay twice as much if they deemed it necessary ! They are at- 
tracted not so much by the popular prices as by the perfect fit, the beau- 
tiful modeling, the thorough gentility and the extreme beauty of our 
clothes. And the point we want to make is this : If our popular priced 
lines will satisfy such a class of men, they will satisfy anybody. These 
clothes are ready to wear this instant. We keep them in such shape that 
they do not even need pressing. This is a swift age we're living in, and 
we believe in giving swift service. 

We ACTUALLY DO Save You $2.50 to $5.00 on Our 

Fall Suits and 
Overcoats at 



WKATHER -Partly 
oloiuiy weatlier to- 
iiiglit aii<i Sitiirday: 
iiiit iiitirli diange in 
teinptrature; mcxler- 
itg westerly wlud*. 




WE ALONE SELL KNOX 

WE ALQME iSELL REGAL SHO 
WE ALONE 



'^^ 




Tir^ C-^l^^^ 4-Vk^ T^^^TT Oi/»j^lvl^=k-rv-k Visit our Boys' Department and discover 

we OOlVe Llle OOy rrODiem how neatly you can fit out the boy from head 
to foot. The prices are so moderate you'll be astonished. Everything in novelties that boys like. 

Boys' Suits and Overcoats $4.50 to $12. Boys' Duplex Suits (LKs ) $5 



i 



• 




r 



Oak Hall Trousers 



Sup«rior Street at Fourth Avenue West. 



You've heard of 
them a hundred 
times. Now try a pair and see why they're famous. Our 
prices represent a saving of a dollar, at least, per f»air. 

$3.00 $400 $5.00 

(The Mo^t Beautiful Patierna in Yearn.) 1 



• 




WILL NOT OPEN 
OFFICIAL MAIL 

Communication From Ameri- 
can Federation to Trades 
Assembly to Wait. 

The members of the Federated Trades 

Assembly of Duluih do not know yet 

wliether or not their charter has been 
revoked. They will not know until 
next Friday night, when the regular 
meeting of tlie as.sembly 'Will be held. 
for C. B. I'ncapher. the secretary, will 
open no official communications from 
the American Federation of Labor un- 



til ordered to do so by the assembly in 
session. 

Mr. I'ncapher says he has received a 
letter., the envelope bearing the return 
card ot tlie American Federation of 
Labor, but he has not opened it and 
does not know whetiier or not it con- 
tain.s tiie revocation of the charter. 

Duhith union men say that the fed- 
erated trades assembly will be con- 
tinued a.s a local body in the event of 
revocation of the charter. All local 
unions are affiliated with it and they 
wil! all iiold off from the American Fed- 
eration of Labor until the local 
assembly is reinstated. 
a 

Postmaster at Floodwood. 

Washington, Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Eben B. Robinson was 
today appointed postmaster at Flood- 
wood, St. Louis county. Minn., vice C. 

D. Rutherford, deceased, and Louis D. 
Button was appointed rural carrier and 
Alvin Childs substitute for route 1 at 
Kasson. Minn. 



Don't complain aboul the cost of 
living. Barihe-Martin «eli groceries 
at wholesale. 



r 



TELLS WOMEN HOW 
TO GET BALLOT 




Oriental Magi c 

Tomorrow! 



Come in ! Flowers grown from a pot of sand. 
Xo curtains or draperies around. Of course it's a 
trick, but worth coming a good distance to see. 

To be sure, the flowers are real. Prof. Ver- 
melts will cut them off and toss them to you. Lots 
of other Japanese and Hindu magic. It is all for 
your entertainment — pleasant quarter-hour in 



magic. 



10 and 11 A. M. and 3, 4 and 
4:30 P. M. Saturday— 4th Floor. 




THE BIG 

GLASS BLOCK 
5TOKE 




QUALITY IS^ 
PARAMOUNT 



Rev. Mrs. Ferguson Says Her 

Plan Would Easily Bring 

Suffirage. 

Washington. Oct. 15. — Rev. Mrs. 

Georgia Ferguson, English by birth. 

associate pastor of the People's church 

here, declared last night at the first 

fall meeting of the District Woman's 

."Suffrage association tliat tlie women of 

the United States could obtain suffrage 
if they would pursue the course sug- 
gested by Samuel Adams in the days 
before the revolutionary CK)ngress; 
namely, to elect committees to study 
the conditions in each state, tlien call 
the committees together and adopt a 
scientific platform. If this were done, 
she said, any of tiie larger mens politi- 
cal parties would be glad to allay it- 
self with the new party to obtain the 
end for which it was working. 
■ 

Morrifton C'oniini»Mioner ReNig^nM. 

Little Falls. Minn.. Oct. 1"). — Peter 
Virnig, commissiojier for five years 
from the Third district, has tendered 



his resignation because of ill health. 
The chairmen of the to^vn boards of 
Hilman, Leigh, (iianile, Pierz. Buh and 
Little Fall><, with Mayor Moeglein of 
Little Falls, have been notified to meet 
tomorrow ' afternoon to choose a new 
commissioner. F. X. Virnig of Pierz, 
a brother Of the retiring officer, is a 
candidate. '« 



±ti 



SOMETHING 

: , -NEW 

At the BAZAAR given bv S%ea Glee 
Club, tonight, at 2023 Vv'est Superior 
street. Grand Drawing Saturday 

night. Aibitis-siun 10c. 



Water Proof for 
Fait and Winter 

The higher cut shoe 
you buy, the more they 
cost. But they keep 
you dry. 

$2.50 
$3.00 
$3.50 
$4.00 
$5.00 
$6.00 




$7.00 
$S.OO 



BLODGEn 

" Your Shoe Man'' 

20 W. Superior St. 



MRS. STARKEY 
PASSES AWAY 

Well-Known Dulutli Resident 

Die$ at the Home of 

Her Son. 

Mrs. Mary Slarkey, 81 years old, 
died this n^orning at the home of her 
son. Carl Starkey, a mail jarrier, of 318 
Ninth avenue east. Mrs. Starkey has 
lived in Duluth many >ears, and is 
survived bV several children. The body 
was removed to the undertaking par- 
lors of C. J. Stewart, and will be sent 
to Neoga, Til., tonight for interment. 

IXDIA\ GETS OFl^ASY. 



Ashland. "Vris., Oct. 15..— (Special to 
The Herald.)— A fine of J25 and costs 
settled, the acqount with the court of 
Frank S. Doolittle, the Chippewa In- 
dian, who cut Assistant Farmer Nor- 
bert Sero of the Bad River reservation 
with a razor. The court permitted the 
charge of Assault with intent to do 
great bodily Injury to be changed to 
assault when the case came before 
Judge McCloud. and the accused, 
pleading guilty, received the sentence 
stated. Ha paid the fine. 



Stewart Heaters 

Wlh Save Fuel 

They have made good 
right here in Duluth. 

Don't ' buy a No-Name 
heater — one that the maker 
is ashamed of, when you can 
buy a 

STEWART FOR $25.00. 
TERMS, $1.00 PER WEEK 




JSkfi^ 



state. After rc- 
length, Ivins, in 

the appellate di- 



NEW AHACK 
ONJGAYNOR 

New York Political Delop- 

ments Move Rapidly in 

City Campaign. 

Judge Resigns From Bench, 

But Fails to Answer 

Charges. 



New York, Oct. 15. — With State Sena- 
tor Patrick H. McCarren, Democratic 
leader of Brooklyn, seriously ill; with 
William M. Ivins, the Republican sup- 
porter of Hearst, making additional 
charges against (Jaynor, and eighteen 
more Indictments returned against 
Tammany election officers In connec- 
tion with the alleged theft of the In- 
dependence league primaries, there was 
plenty of material to sustain interest 
in the political situation during the 
last twenty-four hours. 

Of the more formal occurrences was 
tlie resignation of Gaynor as a justice 
of the state supreme court, a stej) 
which had been looked for ever sine.-* 
hi.s acceptance of the Democratic nom- 
ination for mayor. 

Ivins, who charged Gaynor on Mon- 
day night last with conspiracy to de- 
feat the enforcement of the anti-race 
track betting law In this state, a 
charge in which he Is supported by As- 
sistant District Attorney Elder of 
Brooklyn, canie out with another 
broadside in which he charged the 
former justice with attempting to up- 
set the state constitution by an im- 
proper decision. 

>ew Attack Ou Gaynor. 

This declaration is based upon the 
so-called Guden case of several years 
back, involving the removal by the 
then — go\ernor, Mr. O lell — of a sheriff 
of Kings county (Brooklyn). Guden 
was removed on evidence that he had 
made pre-election promises, agreeing 
to make certain appointments if 
elected. Ivin.s charges that Gaynor 
had the ca.«e reopened in order to gain 
public commendation and to overrule 
the governor. 

In his decision at the time, Gaynor 
held that the sheriff's removal was il- 
legal, but this was reversed by the 
higlier courts of the 
viewing the case at 
his statement, says: 

"A few days after 
viision had reveised Gaynor, the latter 
was walking through tlie corridors oi' 
the courthouse and met one of the di.'^- 
trict attorneys, who said, *By the way, 
I see the appellate divisic^n has re- 
versed \-our decision on tliis (Uiden 
case.' 

I'romiseU to SuMtaiu lliin. 

"The judge replied; '1 didn i think 
that they would have the indecency to 
do it, because 1 saw them before I gave 
my deci.sion in the first instance and 
tliey promised that they would sustain 
me." " 

Never before in the history of New 
York have so many independent tickets 
been placed in the tteld by petition. 
There will be at least twenty of them, 
necessitating the use of an official bal- 
lot 4 feet 1' inches wide and 15 inches 
deei>. This is believed to be the largest 
ballot ever used anywhere. 

Two of the trio of candidates for 
mayor of Greater New York kept up 
tlie agitation of a daily quickening 
campaign l)y speeches in Manhattan 
and Brooklyn last nig'lit. William .1. 
Gaynor, the Democratic nominee, 
crossed over from his home section in 
Brooklyn and made his lirst appearance 
liere since the campaign started in 
Manhattan; Otto Bannard, the Itepub- 
lican nominee, reversed this and made 
a series of speeches In Brooklyn, ^^'ill- 
iam U. Hearst, nominated b>- the In- 
dependents for mayor, did riot speak, 
although a mass meeting in his sup- 
port was held at Cooper union. Mi-. 
Gaynor spoke at Carnegie hall. 
No Iteply to CharseN. 

The greatest interest was centered in 
Gaynor's appearance, in the expectation 
that he would answer in detail the 
charges that have been made against 
him. the most serious of which is the 
insinuation that he favored the race 
track element and attempted to frus- 
trate the enforcement of legislation 
designed to check betting. In this re- 
.«pect his hearers were disappointed, 
for he did not reply to the charges 
ai length, but declared that his record 
must be the answer to his detractors. 

At the Hearst meeting William Ivins, 
a Republican but a supporter of Hearst, 
was one of the principal speakers. It 
had been predicted that he would make 
additional charges against Former 
.Judge Ga>nor, but the speaker con- 
fined himself to reviewing Gaynor's 
record in general rather than citing 
any specific instances where the judge 
erred. 

Would Be PreNideut. 

William A. Deford, Independence 
league candidate for attorney general 
in 1906. told of a conversation with 
Rudolph Block, a former Hearst em- 
plo\-e and an adherent of Gaynor, in 
which Block is alleged to have said 
that "Judge Gaynor e.xpects to be 
elected governor and then iiresident of 
the United States, and he wants to 
take the nomination from Tammany 
Hall in order to work out his ambi- 
tion." 

Two unusual incidents disturbed both 
ihe Hearst and the Gaynor meetings. 
At the former Deford began a denun- 
ciation of State Senator Patrick H. 
McCarren, who is critically ill, when a 
voice from the audien«e interrupted 
dramatically with the exclamation: 
"McCarren Is dead!' 

An immediate liush fell over the as- 
semblage, and Deford apologized to his 
hearers with the explanation that he 
was attacking McCarren's principles 
and not McCarren the man. The aud- 
ience, although hostile to the Brooklyn 
leader, cheered those .sentiments wildly. 
SulTragrette Up Asatu. 

It was a militant suffragette who 
disturbed the Gaynor gathering. Gay- 
nor had barely got under way with his 
address when a woman rose in the 
audience and called, "How about wom- 
an suffrage?" S^he was Miss Maud 
Malone, a familiar figure at political 
gatherings. 

"The question which you ask me is 
not pertinent to this meeting," said 
Gaynor, after some embarrassment, 
"and I shall ask you, in order to pre- 
vent any further interruption, to go 
first and consult my wife." 

.Still Miss Malone refused to be seat- 
ed, and after tonsulting with Herman 
RIdder, who presided as chairman, a 
policeman escorted her from the hall. 

Gaynor's speech was a plea for "per- 
sonal liberty" and for a liberal con- 
struction, particularly of the Sabbath 
observance laws. 

In discussing the cleansing of the 
city of graft the judge paid a tribute 
to Former President Roosevelt and his 
work while a municipal officer in New 
York city. 

PraiMC for Roooevelt. 

"There was a man," he said, "that 
did what he tliought was right In spite 
of all bosses and all politicians. He 
had great defects, but they only tended 
to show how large he was." 

Bannard's speech ia Brooklyn was 
confined principally to municipal is- 
sues. He avoided personal attacks, as 
he has done all along, but was a severe 
critic of Tammany in general. 



$2 Ladies' New Kid Gloves $1.00 

Fine $2.00 New Glace Mousquetaire 
Kid Gloves, black and colors, all sizes, 
for $1 a pair. ^^K» 
Sale is for Sat- T^T • .«» *- 

urday only. 




26 West a>iii>erior Sti*ect. 



9. ill (iimmm ^ Ok 



'Correct Dress for Women 



IVBW FALL LINKS IX 



ernn s 



Gl 



oves 



Just Received. 

Heavy Cape Kid Gloves. 

Brown, tan, black and 
gray, plain or heavily 
embroidered backs — at 
$1.30, $1.73 and $2.00. 
Chamoisette Gloves — 
Heavy reindeer quality 
—at $1.25. 




The Superiority 

of the Gidding 

Popular Priced 

Garments Is 



Due to the fact that we Specialize 
in Women's Wear. We devote 
our entire time, energy and talent 
to the betterment of Gidding 
Garment. Our two-store buying 
power, our New York connec- 
tion.'^, our thorough search of the 
markets, and our tremendous out- 
let for garments of the higher 
class, together with our intimate 
acquaintance with the best tail- 
oring: establishments of the coun- 
try, enable us to raise our medium 
priced garments to a better 
standard than the average all-around 
buyer of popular-priced goods can 
possibly attain. j 

Plain and Practical Street 
Suits $25.00 to 

$50.00 

This spati of prices covers a wide 
range of Styles and great diversity of 
choice, in Broadcloth, Serge, Worsted, 
Homespun and Wale Suitings. All 
are extremely stylish, richly lined, and perfect in cut and finish. 

Swagger Utility Coats 

Plain colors and handsome Mixtures — Graceful Styles, in the 
new semi-tight cut — Fine Broadcloths and the Stylish Hcay- 
Weave Diagonals, Wales and Homespuns, as well as the popu- 
lar Kersevs, Meltons, etc. Prices $15.00, 919.50, $22.50, 
$25.00 to $50.00. 

$6.75 Silk Petticoats 'T' $5.00 

Plain colors, to match the Street Suits, odd shades and plain 
tops, with pretty Dresden flounces — several styles to select 
from; 



D 



resses 



for General Wear 



In Silk, Broadcloth, Serge and Venetian, ''classy'" little one- 
piece styles, cut on correct lines, and as "neat as a new pin"-^ 
Staple Colors and popular Autumn Shades. Prices $19.50, 
and up. 

Refined and Snappy Street Hats 

Style, Originality, Diversity and B e - 
comingness, are the dominant characteristics 
of the Gidding Hat Showing. Our Ver- 
satile designers are constantly expressing 
clever ideas through the snajjpy little Tur- 
bans, Brimmed Hats and unique draped ef- 
fects, in Felt, \>lvet, Beaver and Fur, 
which are daily taking their places 
among t\\e showing. State your price, and 
we'll show you a hat to suit both purse 
and fanc}', or we'll make one. Prices 
$7.50 to $20.00 for Street Styles— 
$12.50 to $100.00 for Dressy Hats. 

Waists on I Special Sale 

Waists Regu arly d? Q 7 ^ 

$12.50 to $20.00 at ^PO./J 

Fancy Chiffon, Net and Corean Silk Waists, in popular street 
and evening shades. Just one or two of a kind. 




Taffeta and Messaline Waists 

$5.00 



$6.75 to $8.50 
Values at 



Tailored or fancy Styles, in Taffeta or Messaline — Black. Navy, 
Brown, Reseda. Catawba. Green and Olive — also Plaid Silks, 
and the new and fashionable Jersey Blouse. 

Tailored Linens '' '^^al"! tf '' $4.00 

Tucked and Plaited Styles, some daintily embroidered. 1 

Fancy Net Waists '^SJ^f.f $3.75 

Cream, Ecru and White — several different styles to select from 
— some embroidered in colors. 



H 



osiery 



Ladies' Underwear 

Union Suits, in Silk-and-wool, Merino, 
Orient Silk, or Cotton — High neck, long 
sleeves and ankle length, or low neck and 
no sleeves. Prices $1.25 to $8.00. 

Ladies' Out-Size Union Suits, $1.25 
to $3.00. 

Children's Union Suits, $1.00 and up. 

The Gidding Corner^ 1st Avenue West and Superior St. 



ladiks* fall 
ho.se:. 

In Cashmere. Lisle 
and Ci>tton, 50c up. 

girls' cashmkkb 
hose:, 

at 35r, 50c and SSe. 

BOVS* HEAVY 

RIBIIED HOSB, 

In wool and cotton. 
Special at 85c. 



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I 
111 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: ^ FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1909. 



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1 



juvenile Department— First Floor. 

Growing Girls, and the Mothers 
of Growing Girls 



are fast learning to appreci- 
ate this complete and well- 
stocked ready-to-wear store 
for the outfitting of the 
younger Misses. It is a 
new system of dressing girls 
that has come in with other 
improved ideas and advance- 
ments of the twentieth cen- 
tury. So little Miss "Up- 
to-date" and her mother are 
fast giving up the **home 
made" idea of dressing. 

Jaunty Junior Suits 

Two and Three Piece Styles 

Prices $15.00, $16.50, 

$19.50, $22.50, $25.00 
to $35.00. 

Stylish models with the new 
36 to 40-inch coats, and pretty 
plaited skirts. Practical serges, 
and styhsh heavy weaves, as 
homespuns, diag^onals, unfinished 
worsteds, etc. Staple colors, 
new shades and mixtures. Sizes 
12 to 20 vears. 



Infants' Wear 

Third Floor. 




Our Babyv^ear De- 
partment is Complete ' 
in Every Detail. 

COATS — In imitation 
lambs' wool, corduroy, 
.«erge, cashmere, crepel- 
la and poplin, plain or 
hand embroidered styles 
— prices $4.00 to $10.50. 

liOXXKTS — A com- 
plete line in imitation 
lambs' wool, ''orduroy, 
plain or cor .jd silks. 
Angora, velvet and felt 
— prices oOe to $6.00. 

Full line of Dresses. 
Skirts. Flannels, Cradle 
Blankets. Sacques, Knit 
Shawls, Sweaters, Mit- 
tens. Toques, etc.. also 
.Arnold Knit Goods. l>r. 
Denton's Sleeping (Jar- 
iiients, Bath R<)l)es and 
Novelties for tiifts. 




The Universally Favored 
PeterThompson;the New 
"Co-Ed" Dress and the 
Woolen School Frock 

Are all practical and jatinty 
styles for school wear. 

Peter Thompsons — Xatty, 
stvles in red and naw serges. 
Sizes 6 to 16— at $6.75 to $25. 



«i 



•Co-ed" Dresses — Plain and 
combination colors. Sizes 12 
to 18— at $19.50 to $29.50. 

One-Piece Dresses — Plain 
colors, plaids and checks. Sizes 
4 to 16. Prices $5.75 to $16.50. 

Separate Panama Skirts for 
school misses and small women 
— blue, navy and brown. Prices 
$6.75 to $8.75. 
Coafs 
For Little Tots, Girls and Misses— 
A better and more extensive collec- 
tion of coats than we have ever be- 
fore shown, and a broader range of 
styles and materials than any other 
store in this section of the country- 
is now showing. 

Chinchilla Coats— Champagne, 
gray, navy, seal and red. Box 
or full lencrth. Sizes 8 to i6 yrs. 
Prices $15.00 to $25.00. 

Sizes 2 to 8 years. Prices $5.75 
to $15.00. 

A very complete line of Cloth \ 
Coats in broadcloth, kersey, melton 
and swagger mannish mixtures, all 
sizes and all prices from $3.50 to 
$25.00. 
Chlldren'5 and Misses' Furs 

Pretty sets in Genuine Lynx, 
chinchilla, moufflon, krimnier, 
opposum, fox, coney, beaver, imita- 
tion ermine, lamb, angora and 
thibet. Wee tots' furs $1.50 to $8.50. 
School Girls' Furs $5.00 to $25.00. 

We are also showing several ; 
stvles in Girls' Fur Coats at $25.00 
to $35.00. 

^ " — ^ "* Stylish Headwear for 

Girls 

Hats, Caps and Tams 
in cloth, felt, beaver and 
fur. We would especi- 
ally direct attention to 
our extensive line of Fur 
Caps, with and without 
ear-pads, and Beaver Hats. Prices $2.50 to $5.0a 
Also a verv extensive line of Tams of all sorts — 50c to 

$2.50. 

The, Gidding Corner— at First Avenue West and Superior St. 




-**• 



-fyf 



SILBERSTEIN & BONDY Ca ' 




SILBERSTEIN & BONDY CO. 




SILBERSTEIN & BONDY CO. 



THESUPERI0RITY0FS.&B.FASffl01VS 

E MPHASIZED BY PH ENOMENAL BUYING 

We are in the midst of the greatest season 's business this store has ever 
experienced, which means something. Hundreds of women outside of our usual 
patronage, whose trade we have not heretofore enjoyed, are ^yv^J^S; buying, buy - 
ing. S.% B. BUYERS HAVE SCORED AGAIN! WE HAVE THE WANTED 
STYLES. Everything in apparel that the woman of fashion, as well as her less 
pretentious sister, may desire, and at a figure satisfactory to both. We ve pre- 
pared for a record-breaking business tomorr ow. We know it will come. 

A WONDERFUL ASSEMBLAGE OF 
MAN-TAILORED SUIT MODELS 



$24.50, $29.50, $35.00 $39.50, $45.00 



-t-s^^ 



^ " n 



iri' 



Women are finding here the Suits indorsed by the leading journals of fashion. 
The makers of S. & B. Suits have the advantage of style information from the de- 
signers of two continents, consequently they prepare garment styles which are 
chosen by experts. 

The practical models are here as well as the most elaborately trimmed crea- 
tions,, consequently the woman who wants a suit at a medium price will find that 
just as much study and attention have been given to her needs as to the require- 
ments of those wanting garments costing three or four times as much. 

For tomorrow, we shall feature prominently a series of attractive groups m 
Women's Suits for fall, embracing materials of serges, broadcloth, fancv worsteds, 
wide wale serges and novelty mannish suitings. The coats are the fashionable 
45 to 52-inch lengths, full satin lined, seven-eighths and form-fitting models. The 
skirts show the latest yoke effects; also the plainer plaited designs. Duluth 
women will find the assortments to their liking, while the range of prices offers a 
satisfving varietv at whatever figure arranged upon. There are numberless 
styles' from $24.50 to $65.00, with perhaps the strongest variety averaging Sp3o.OO. 



P»W*> 



New Long Coats 



$16.50, $19.50. $24.50. $27.50,132.50 



^"^^Vp^^^ NECKWEA.R 



WINTER 

BRILLL^NT SHOWING. 




New arrivals in Plauen I.,ace Col- 
lars, Yokes and Jabots, all styles. 

Large Lace Collars for coats — 
35f to $.t.75. 

Xew Lace Yoke? — 50c to $1..'>0. 

Lace Jabots, imitation Irish lace 
— 25c to $1.25. 

Coat Sets, all lace — $1.25 up- 
wards. 

Hand-made Irish Lace Jabots — 
35c to $7.50. 

Tulle Bows in white, ready-to- 
wear — 35c. 

New Tailored Bows in all colors 
— 2.'>c and 35c. 

New Fancy Silk Stocks, with or 
without jabots — the newest effects, 
from 35c up. 

New Fancy Head Scarfs — at 
$2.2.>, $2.50 aiid up. 

THE NEW GLOVES— 

Complete showing of new fall 
stvles and s^hades. in "Fownes' La 
Tosca." Pari.s point backs, pique 
seams, all wanted colors — $2 pair. 

•'Fownes' Dagmar," pique seams, 
two-clasp, all new shades — $1.50 
per pair. 

"Fownes* Eugenie," overseams — 
all shades — $1.50 pair. 

Very Special 
SILK STOCKINGS— 
..00 pair. 

A splendid value in silk ho-^e. all 
the new and desirable shades such 
as old rose, lavender, pink, light 
blue, navy, corn, brown, wistaria, 
gray; al.so black and white — $1.75 
value — special tomorrow $1 pair. 



With the advance signals of winter, every 
woman's thoughts turns to the question of a 
Winter Coat. Our present showing of the new 
Long Coat Models has been conceded our best. 
The care in selection of the rough novelty fab- 
rics, combined with skilled tailoring in the con- 
struction of the garments tells best why S. & 
B. Coats are the vogue among Duluth's smart 
dressers. 

Splendid new Military Ulsters and strictly 
Tailored Long Coats, at $16.50. 

AT $19.50 and $24.50— There is a vast as- 
sortment of the swagger Military Models, the new 
Cossack and Imperial styles, the strictly tailored, 
semi-fitting coats, etc. — all the new heavy cloths, 
rough Scotch worsteds, zibelines, diagonals— at 
$27.50 and $32.50— the style range is un- 
limited, with every popular weave for winter 
wear in the display. The form-fitting coats of 
rich broadcloth with guaranteed satin linings, 
the heavy Auto Ulster with Scotch plaid lin- 
ings, the Military Coats of every favored design. 



Stylisli Furs 



S. & B. Furs Arc Guaranteed 



Early selections are best, first, because of 
variety, and second, because price advances 
won't affect the cost to you. Many lines of 
scarce Furs are rapidly advancing in price. 
Our raw furs were bought almost a year ago, 
and at what Ave consider a very low figure, 
because they are prime skins. Did we not 
know what we buy we could not guarantee 
you furs. There isn't the slightest chance of 
going wrong on quality— and our prices are 
very, very reasonable. Buyers tell us so, and 
they know. Look at these for instance: 



EXTRA SPECIAL. 
Set of Black Jap Lynx, shawl col- ^^C CiCi 
lar and rug muff ^Z^^*\J\J 

EXTRA SPECIAL. 

Full length Russian pony skin coats, lincJ witii 
guaranteed satin; rich glossy fur, J^Q QQ 



at 



$1. 



RIBBON SPECIALS— 

Messaline ribbons, 6 inches wide, 
finest quality, all colors, regular 
39c value — tomorrow "5c yaiil. 

A line of pretty beltings, in 
various shades will bo offered for 
Saturday at Jii.st Half. 

LATEST JEWELRY 
NOVELTIES— 

We invite inspection to our stock 
of the latest jeweliy novelties. 
Here you will And every latest 
whim of fashion. New Back Combs 
and Barrettes, New Jet Novelties, 
from 50c to $18.50. Necklaces, 
La Vallieres, Brooches, Hat Pins, 
Earrings, Belt Buckles, Bracelets, 
Pendant.'!, etc. 

NEW CORAL 
NOVELTIES— 

Genuine coral beads; — $1.00 and 
$1.50 strand. 

Genuine coral dog collars, 1,200 
beads — $22.50. 

Coral La Vallieres — $5 to $10.50 

Imported Beaded Bags — $4,50 to 
$12.50. 

Genuine Mosaic Brooches — 50c 
and $1.00. 

NEW LEATHER 
GOODS— 

Special showing of the latest nov- 
elties in genuine seal, pig.skin, pin 
seal and patent leather, new fancy 
metal frames, etc. Prices from $5 
to $39.50. 



NEW PARIS TURBANS 
At $7.50 



A SPECIAL 
SHOWING OF 



A brilliant, piquant, fascinating 
turban now the favorite — 

For Saturday we feature a niaj^iiificent as- 
semblage of the much admired hat styles fav- 
ored by the foreign designers. Turbans lead, 
and the showing of new models tomorrow will 
demonstrate the millinery leadership of The 
S. & B. Co. as never before. 

Beautifully trimmed creations, new shapes, 
side-rolled effects and sharply upturned brims. 
Try on as many as you please, choose from hats 
which look worth far more than the figure 
askt tomorrow. $7.50 is the price. See the 
hats on our Third floor. 




1 



DR. COOK WILL 
LECTURE HERE 

His Story of Polar Dash 

Is to Be Heard in 

Duluth. 

Dr. Frederick Cook, the Brooklyn 
Arctic explorer, who claims to have 
discovered the North Pole and who is 
involved in a heated controversy with 
Commander Robert A. Peary, who also 
claims to have reached the goal, will 
lecture in Duluth soon. The date has 
not yet been fixed. , c^^ ^ 

Since his return to the United States. 
Dr Cook has been very much in de- 
mand and he is enthusiastically re- 
ceived In every city he visits. His 
lecture is said to be entertaining and 
instructive and he gives liis hearers 
a good insight Into the hardships 
which must be encountered by explor- 
ers in' the Far North. 

Dr. Cook will appear in St. Paul and 
Minneapolis and those who are ar- 
ranging for his appearance tliere have 
secured Duluth parties to arrange for 
the lecture here at the same time. The 
date will be set soon. 



on "Representative Government." He 
was Introduced by Preisident E. A. 
Williams of tlie city commission, and 
talked for about two hour.«?, during 
which time he pointed out some of the 
dangers that he thought menaced the 
interests of the people." 

CROWDED SKIFF S)VAMPS 

WHILE CROSSING SLIP 



(Continued from page 1.) 



I« Follette at Di^^iuarek. 

Bismarck, N. D., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Senator K. M. La Foll- 
ette of Wisconsin addressed a large 
audience at the Bijou Tuesday night 



they threw no light upon the identity 
of the men who were lost. 

The accident happened this morning 
at 7 o'clock. As has bten customary 
for years, the laborers working on the 
Northern Pacific dock or the boats tied 
up in the Eleventh avtnue slip row 
across to their work from the Marine 
Iron company's dock, and in their zeal 
to get across, jump eagerly and care- 
lesslv into the boat. Oi'ien the boats 
are overloaded, and tjiis morning was 
one instance. 

Sixteen Men In Boat. 

Workmen in the Marine Iron com- 
pany's yard say there were about six- 
teen laborers in the Hat bottomed row 
boat when it was pushed off from the 
float. 

The men had not rowed It ten feet, 
when without a moment's warning, it 
went down, swamped from the weight 
of the load it was carrying. 

Wild confusion followed, the sixteen 
men thrown into a panic by what had 
befallen them, scrambling in the cold 
water in a fierce battle for life. 

Workers in the shipyard lent what 
•assistance they could in helping the 
half-drowned men ashore. Several of 
those who escaped did so only after 
the most heartrending struggles and 
one case of heroism came put of the 
disaster. '- ' 

Among others in tnC boftt was one 
large, very heavy mah tind his efforts 



to swim to shore were pitiful. He 
wildly thrashed the water with his 
arms and called lustily for help. Twice 
he went down and came up again and 
after he had been submersed the sec- 
ond time, a fellow workman grabbed 
him under the arms, and swimming 
with his legs and liis one free hand, 
managed to^get himself and l^»s obese 
and helpless companion to a place oi 
safety. Cheers went up from the on- 
lookers for his deed. . 

Most of the men were successful in 
their struggles and managed to reach 
Uie Iron company's fioat a minute or 
two after the accident. The worK- 
men in the yard assisted them in get- 
ting out of the water. 

All Knn For Home. 

As soon as the half-drowned men got 
safely ashore, they made for theli 
homes to procure dry clothing. The 
survivors were so excited, as were the 
one or two shipyard employes, who 
were present, and there was such gen- 
eral confusion following the accident 
that no one is able to give very lucid 
accounts of i-t. However, most of the 
men Insist that two of their number 
went down and did not come up again 
and the life-saving crew is busy 
dragging the slip. When the accident 
occurred, the men were on their way 
to work on the Mutual Transit freight- 
er Rochester,, tied at the N. P. dock. 

"It is a wonder to me that there 
have not been more serious accidents 
than this during the past summer, 
said Edward Grignon, of the Marine 
Iron company, this morning. Mr. 
Grigon arrived on the scene shortly 
after the boat had gone down. 

•'We who work around here, have 
rften remarked that that red rowboat 
Those laborers use would go down with 
some of them. On day we counted 
twentv-one meii in that fourteen-foot 
boat. " They managed to make the trip 
in safety, however. 

"If a tug had been coming up the 



slip the boat would certainly have 
been swamped. Many times I have 
seen tlie boat loaded as heavily, and 
often more heavily,- than it was this 
morning, 

"Quite often some man goes over- 
board when they land. There is a rule 
that the last man out of the boat has 
to lake it back for another load, and 
as none of them want the job, being 
anxious to get to tlieir homes or their 
work, there is a wild scramble to get 
out and onto the dock. Sometimes a 
man is pushed out of the boat and 
sometimes, in his hurry, he falls over- 
board." 

After the boat had dumped all its 
occupants in the water this morning it 
came to the surface again and was re- 
covered. It is now tied to the North- 
ern Pacific dock, ready to carry more 
workmen on hazardous trips across 
the slip. 

An accident similar to the one which 
occurt-ed this morning cost the lives of 
half a dozen laborers a few years ago. 
At that time a scow ran down the row- 
boat. 

Up to 1 o'clock this afternoon the 
life savers had not succeeded in recov- 
ering either of the bodies. 

SEM TO PEN FOR ROBBIXO 
BABY'S BANK OF 7 CENTS. 

Chicago, Oct. 1.5. — Robert Koller, a 
self-confessed burglar, was yesterdav 
sentenced to an indeterminate term in 
the state prison, after being found 
guilty of stealing 7 cents. 

Tiie crime was committed Sept. 2 4. 
when Koller entered a house and wa.s 
surprised by a police sergeant. Roller's 
sole plunder was a Laby's toy bank, 
containing the 7 coppers, which will 
cost him so dear. 

The court was informed, before sen- 



tencing the man. tliat he had a ba'l 
police record and had served a term in 
a New York prison. 

"It i3 tough to be sent to jail for 
maybe ten years," eald Koller, after 
the sentence was imposed, "wlien I 
only got 7 cents. ' 



Don't complain al)out the cost of 
living. Barthe-Martin sell groceries 
at wholesale. 

EMBARGO ON SHEEP 

REMOVED BY STATES. 



• A' Bi l aP T O. ■* 



Ottawa, Ont., Oct. 15. — The Canad'an 
government has been notified of the 
removal by the United States of the 
r!0-dav embargo on sheep for breedinsf 
purposes. 

» 

WabaMKo ToMtolTiee Hobbrd. 

Redwood Falls, Minn., Oct. 15. — The 
safe in the postoffice at Wabasso, this 
county, was blown open with dynamite 
on Wednesday morning. Only a small 
amount of money and stamps were 
taken. There Is no clue to the robbers, 
who are supposed to have escaped in a 
buggy. The postmaster is D. E. Billing- 
ton. 



Boy a Year's Glove Supply 

You can easily afford to do that at 
the tremendous glove sale tomorrow. 
$2 00 Ladies' New Kid Gloves at $1.00 
—and $1 25 ^pm9 ^ 9, 

new kid gloves 
for 89c. Sat- 
urday only at 



CLCVt SH 



20 West Superior Street. 




■V- 



X r »'i«'-Tr «■• .• 



yinmi^Btmstae^r. 



-4r— »■•— .T"*-™"" 



J 



i 



r 



Mb 




, 



mm 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERACD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1309. 



CRANBERRY 
IS ON DECK 

Pie Material Makes Its Ap- 
pearance in Duluth 
Once More. 



Grapes and Peaches StiO 

Features of the Fruit 

list. 



The fi:'stive cranl>erry, which a year 
ago was conspicuous in the local pro- 
duce market because of its high price, 
on acount ol" a sl:ortage in tlie crop, 
has made its appearance on Michisfan 
street again and will be a fixture on 
ilie list lor tlie rest of the winter. 

A larger crop is being gatliered tliis 
fail ana none oi tiie stringency which 
niarke<i the market lor tlie berries last 
year, is expected. Tl>e cranberries are 
quoted today at |7 u barrel, or J:.'. 50 a 
bushel. 

« • • 

Concord grapes are still a big fea- 
ture of th«f fruit list and prices art 
down, tlie grapes being i|uotfd at 17 
cents a l>asket. Tiie Concords are 
from Michigan, while from California, 
tiJUie choice Tokays are being received. 
The Tokays are selling at $1.25. 
• • « 

As the winter sea.><on draws nearer 
and neart-r. oranges are getting nearer 
and liearer tlieir place as leaders in 
the fruit market. They are to be had 
about all the year around, but during 
the summer, there are so many counter 
attraction.^ in the fruit line, wliicli are 
to be liad only at that season of tlie 
year, that oranges are tiirown in tlie 
discard. Uut when the weather begins 
to get cold again, the demand for 
oranges briglitens up. Some nne fruit 
Is being received by the Michigan 
street houses at the present lime. It 
is selling at prices ranging from $2.L'j 
t<> $4 a box. according to the size ot the 
box and the quality of tiie fruit. 
« « • 

Receipts of apples are increasing 
every «lay. Some winter apples are 
now coming in and receipts of them 
will be heavy from now until the close 
of the navigation season. 

Fancy B^n i>avl3 apples are selling 
at $:J.75 and several varieties are of- 
fered at J,;.5'> to S'l.r.o. 

Crab apples from the Bitter Root ; 
valley of Mont:\na. where a number of j 
people from the Head of the Lakes 
have gone to become fruit growers and 
agrioulturi3t3 in general, are quite a 
feature of local stocks at the present 
time. They are selling at about J1.7i 
a box. 

• * * 

Receipts of bananas iiave been very 
liberal and the price lias receded from 
4 cents a pr»unJ. where it has been 
stationary for some time past. The 
weakness in tlie market caused by the 
bountiful supplies, has eased the price 
off to «',2 cents to 3*4 cents a pound. 

• • « 

Italian prunes are being freely of- 
fered at |1.;:5. 

• « « 

Pears from the Western states and 
Eastern pears, from New York, are on 
sale. They are offered at $2.50 a box. 

• « • 

Fancy lemons are quoted at $5.75 a 
box and limes at $1._'5. Florida grape 
fruit is selling at $S a box. 

• « * 

Elberta peaches, from Colorado, are 
still being offered here at $1.10 a box. 
« « • 

Home-grown tomatoes are practical- 
ly '>ut of the market and many otiier 
offerings in the line of home-grown 
green vegetables liave disappeared, to 
give way to the hothouse variety. Hot- 
house green onions are being freely 
offereii at l.S cents. Lettuce is $1.25 a 
box. Head lettuce is $1.60 a box. Hot- 
house cucumbers are quoted at $1.35 a 
dozen. 

• • « 
Cauli:l:>wer is .selling at $1.75 a 

bushel. 

• • • 

Parsley is 25 cents a dozen and 
spinach S5 cents a bushel. 

• • • 

Egg plants are $1.25 a bushel. 

• • • 

In the staple vegetable market, the 
principal offerings are potatoes, and 
they are also the most reasonable. The 
entire country seemed to have raised 
a big crop and the spuds are not bring- 
ing more than 44 cents a bushel in 
Michigan street. OiYerlngs of them at 
this price are very liberal. 

• • « 

Swi^et potatoes are enjoying a great 
popularity, selling at $1..35 a bushel. 

• « « 

Staple onion.s are quoted all the way 
from $1.25 to $1.60 per hundred weight. 

• • • 

Holland seed cabbage is offered at 
$12 per ton and new cabbage at $1 per [ 
crate. Roots range in price from l'> 
to 75 cents a bushel. Horse radish is 
$6.5u a barrel. 

« • • 

Poultry and meats liave hepn with- 
out features duiing the week, and 
jjrice.s remain u'-.f-nHntc^d. 



MINERAL OIL 
EXPORTS GROW 



Increase of Over 100,000,- 

000 Gallons Is Shown for 

Last Fiscal Year. 

Washington. Oct. 15. — Mineral oil 
was one ofthe products of the United 
States, which showed an increase in 
Its exports during the year ending 
June ?.0 last, the year being one of de- 
clining exports in our trade as a 
whole, according to a report just is- 
sued by the bureau of statistics. The 
Increase in mineral oil exported dur- 
ing one year was over 100.000.000 gal- 
lons, with an increase in value of 
nearly $2,000.00o. 

tJince the product began to be an 
article of export about a half cen- 
tury ago, more than $2,000,000,000 
worth ot the oil has been exported. 
The production of the oil in the Unit- 
ed States has increased eight fold 
since 1879. 

Mineral oils exported the last fiscal 
year were valued at $106,000,000. which 
was about double those of a decade 
earlier and treble those of 1880. The 
value of the exports has increased 195 
I-er cent since 18S0. 



WOMAN H.WOS HKKSELF 

IN JKVVISH HOSPITAL. 



Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 15, — Mrs. S. W. 
Block, wife of a <lry goods merchant 
of Galveston, Tex., committed sui- 
cide today In the Jewish hospital here. 
by hanging herself with a towel from 



Sarsatabs 



Chocolat«-<-oated tab- 
lets, combine the most 
saccessful reme dies 
for all humors and eruptions, stomach, liver and 
kidney Ailments, loss of appetite, that tir«d feel- 
ing. Thepr are a solid extrjvet of Hood's Sorsapa- 
rilla. havinjf all its wonderful medicinal power. 
Plea.sant to lalce and exceedingly economical. 
Give great satisfaction, especially to tmople pre- 
fftrriixfi tablet to liquid medicines. 100 doses |1. 
PruKKtsts or m.iil. C. I. Hood Co., Lowell, Mass. 
If J$la«le bj Hood lt'i» Good. 



Fretrntrth^s— Lake Avenue» Michigan and Sopertof Stfeets. | Ffeimuth^s — Lake Avenoe» Michigan and Superior Streets. | Fremmth^s — Lake Avenuey Michigan and Superior Streets. 



Another 
Sale of 




i a 



Stylish New Sui 



Smart Tailored Mod- 
els — $22*50 Values 




Qiarming Styles In 

Millinery 
$5.00 to $20.00 



Women^s Smart Coats 




Glance at the price and note how little a new Wind|r «u|_, 
will cost you here tomorrow. Come and see these serviceable 
materials. They're smart styles. 

Made of most fashionable materials, such as cheviots, 
worsteds and fancy weaves, in all the new Fall colors, 
mostly strictly tailored styles. 42 to 45-inch coats; 
skirts, newest pleated effects; special Saturday $16.95. 



50 New Suits $ 

Regular Values Up to $39.50, at 

Styli.sh tailored suits — 42 to 46-inch coats — many are inter- 
lined. Newest pleated skirts. Suits that have style and charac- 
ter, only found in high class models. 

Materials are serges, cheviots, diagonals and 
mannish worsteds; all colors and a complete 
range of sizes. Very special Saturday at $29.50. 

/^ Specials in Black Furs 

Russian Pony Coats — large variety of styles and all lengths, 
some with large storm collars of fox and raccoon, 36 to 54 inches 
^v long. Priced from $39.50 to $139.50. 

52-inch Russian Pony Coats — I 50-in. Wool Seal Coats — Skih- 

Skinner satin lined — C^TO "^'' satin lined; <J?'DQ £\f\ 

"■-special at i^^OU | great bargain at. . 4)07 .^U 




Sets at Special Prices 



-^^ 



Black Hair Sets — Shawl collar, 
rug mutt, spe- 
cial at 



$19.50 



Jap Mink Sets— Shawl follai^ 
rug muff, spe- 
cial at 



$25.«0 



Black Wolf Sets, special $29.50. 



V 



For tomorrow we direct your 
special attention to our superb 
showing of popular price hats, a 
collec":ion in which the elements of 
style and particularity were never 
more satisfactorily combined. 

No two hats alike, all are 
individual and exclusive. The 
shapes are of beaver, felt, silk 
and velvet. The trimmings 
consist of flowers, aigrettes, 
wings and fancy feafhers. 
Every hat is very becoming. 

Children's Hats 

Smart styles in misses' and chil- 
dren's hats, hats that have a style 
of their own, so becoming to the 
3'oung miss. Priced from $2.50 up 
to $10. 



$ 1 7.50 



In Black and Colors — 
Regular $25 Models at 

Women looking for smart coats for practical wear should see 
these coats, with a Httle air of elegance pervading every detail; beau- 
tiful, from material to tailoring. 

52 inches long, made of wide wale worsteds, broad- 
cloth and Scotch mixtures; in several snappy models; 
black and colors; values up to $22.50, special at $17.50. 



Stylish Coats <t95 

Of Black Broadcloth— at ----- - H^-^^^ 

Made of lustrous black broadcloth, about 52-" inches long, 
lined with guaranteed satin, tight fitting; regular price $29.50, 
special at $25.00. 

An opportunity to save on a coat, handsome in 
material and lining, and full of good wear. 



Saturday Specials in Children's Coats 

Misses' Chinchilla Coats— Extra heavy in gray and blue, lined 
throughout, nicelv braid trimmed, ages 8 to 16 Cl C Cifi "^'■ 
years ; regular $19.50 value, at ^^ > J#\JU 

Stylish Coats — Of fine kersey and cheviot in garnet, brown, green, 
smoke and blue, side pleated and back pleated styles, <C t O ^Q 
nicely trimmed; special at *r > Z^*>J\J 

Children's Stylish Coats — Made of wide wale cheviots, in red, 
green, blue and brown, full length, with storm collar; J^ QC 

special at, each *J^^* / ^ 

Another lot of Smart Coat— Fashioned of diagonal cheviot with 
large storm collar, nicely braided in all colors; JO n ^ 

special ^\J*i -J 




New Coiffura 
Hair Rolls 25c 

The latest style, "graduated," cov- 
ered with net; regular 35c ^Cl 
values ; special at ^DC 

Silk Hair Nets 7c 

Extra large size silk hair nets, 
all colors, 10c values; spe 
cial at 



m 

7c 



New Barrettes 25c 

The latest styles, beautifully carved 
hair barrettes, in several different 
shapes: regular 35c value. 



v:i 



.25c 



:A REALLY WONDERFUL BLACK SILK BARGAIN 



36-Inch $ \ .50 Black Taffetta Silk, Yd., 98c 

A semi-annual event, every spriug- and fall. The maker of this fine Silk makes us a price concession by contract- 
ing for a certain number of pieces, whiclw enables us to make this price possible. A silk unrivaled for beauty, sott, 
graceful effect and service— rich pure 9tk Taffeta, oil boiled and fine lustrous finish — entirely free from gum or 



glue filling. A silk that has sold with satisfaction 



r 



$J.50 Quality, Yd., 98c 



J 



for \se vera 1 seasons, at. $1.50 the yard— splendid | Jt 50 OualitV Yd* 98c 
J quality for dresses, drop skirts, waists, lining, etc. I _^^ 1 

Don't miss this bargain — there's a year around service for such taffeta as this — and at $1.00 for 
this yard-wide splendid quality it would positively be wasteful not to supply every possible want — 
regular $1.50 value — special, the yard ^l.OO 



SALE BEGINS TOMORROW MORNING= 



New Creations in 
Neckwear 

Handsome Linen Stocks and 
Jabots — New tailored effects, 
priced from 50c to ^2.00. 

Irish Crochet Collar and 
Ties — handsome styles, from 
75< to $5.00. 

New Lace Stock and Coat 
Collars — large variety of new 
patterns, from 35f^ up to 
$2.50. 

Large variety of new Bows 

and Ties, priced from 25^ and 

up. 



Men s 50c Silk Ties 9fp 

itt ^ "">v Newest Four-in-Hand Styles JL^ ^ ^^ 



r 




Maker's sample line and surplus stock, 
secured by us at a price concession to sell 
these 50c Four-in-Hand Ties at 21c. 

An endless variety of choice pat- 
terns in plain and fancy silks in 
every desirable color; every one a 
good 50c value; special at 21c. 



Children's Sweaters Reduced 



One lot children's 
wool Sweaters, in 
plain or fancies, val- 
ues up to $1 
— special. . . . 



.39c 



Another lot in plani 
and fancies; regular 
values up to $2.00 — 
special 
at 



$1.00 



Men's Wool Underwear $1 



Men's fine wool Underwear in separate garments, shirts and draw- 
ers; in natural gray or ciimel's hair, in plain or ribbed, fine soft gar- 
ments, well finished; special, per garment $1.00. _ 



Men's Shirts and Drawers — 

Regular Valttes Up to $3,50 — Special, at---. 



$1.75 



Broken lots of fine silk and wool mixed and fine cashmere gar- 
ments, medium weights; regular values up to $3.50, per garment $1.75. 




Silk Hen«lquurter.<« at the Head of the Ljakes. 
Lake .\ve> Mivbiicfin and Superior StM., Dniuth, Minn. 



3r>e BH.V.SS!fc)llK 
Bl ."^T 
SrPPOItTKHS, 
25 CI-:i\T.«<. 

An ideal garment 
to wear over cor- 
.set to support the 
bust. A garment 
that gives style 
anfi comfort: made 
of fine Long Clotli. 
la c e trimmed 
around yoke and 
arms. 35c value, 
at 25c. 



(€ 



Harvard Mills'* 

F^^std) Underwear. 




The "Harvard Mills" brand has given satisfaction 
to millions of wearer.s — in all weights, shapes and 
fabrics, for slender, medium and stout forms, suit- 
able for all climates, indoor or out. Some of the 
most satisfactory and popular numbers are described 
below. 

Harvard Mills Union Suits — Heavy cotton or fleece 
lined — in white or cream — per 

suit 

Harvard Mills Union Suits — Half wopl, 
heavy or lightweight, in white or gray. 

Silk and wool and silk and cotton Vests 
and Pants; per garment $1.25 to $1.75. 

Harvard Mills Vests and j Harvard Mills Vests and 
Pants — Made of fine Pants — Wool mixed, in 



$1.25 
$1.75 



white 

50c 



combed cotton, in 
and gray; spe- 
cial, per garment. . 

Harvard Mills Vests and 
Pants — Half wool, in 
eithtr white or gray, 
beautifully fini.Nhed; spe- 
cial, per 
garment. . . . 



white and gray; soft gar- 
ment; special, V/^** 
per garment / ^C 

Harvard Mills Vests and 
Pants — In white or gray, 
2-3 wool, soft, non-irri- 
tating, hand finished — 
at, per gar- d^-f 'jr 
ment *P r ♦ilr J 



.. $J.OO 
Saturday Bargains in Hosiery 



Women's PliMf Wool Hose — In 

plain henf top^i'^ribbed top and all 
ribbed, r^atural^ gray heels and 
toes, dou'ble • .^les. high spliced 
heels ai 
pair. . 

Women's Black Fleeced Lined 
Hose — Ribbed top, double heels 
and toes, full fashioned; -f /r_ 



md ;to.;^jer 2,Sc 



regular 21c value; per jiair. 



Boys' Heavy Worsted Stockings — 

Natural heels and toes, heavy 
ribbed; regular 35c values; O^^ 
special, per pair Z^>J\t 

Children's Fine Cashmere Hose 

— Fine ribbed, very elastic, gray 
heels and toes. 

Sizes 5 to 7, per pair.. .21c 
Sizes 7 to ^Yz. per pair.. 25c 



Women's New Fall Shoes 

Popular Styles $3.50 and $4.00 

The shoe illustrated here is an extra Height But- 
toned Shoe, with the new slant top, a short vamp 
and neat round plain toe. made over a high arch last, 
with stylish Cuban heels, in all leathers — a match- 
less value at $4.00. 




.^t $3.50 we show several very attractive styles in 

gun metal, vici kid and patent button Blucher or lace 

styles, including the new short vamp and high arch, 

heavy soles — ideal shoe to wear with tailored dresses. 

Very special values at $3.50. 

Women's $3.50 Shoes $2.89 

In gun metal, vici kid and patent 
lace or button style, heavy soles. 



Stylish Fall Shoes 

For Boys and Girls 



Misses' Shoes — In gun metal, button style, new form 
last, like upper cut — sizes 11; a to 2; 
special, per pair 

Girls' two-buckle Napoleon Shoes — Like center cut, 
in gun metal leather, sizes 11 J/2 to 2; 
special, per pair ^ 

Same style for boys — In calf leather, 
black or tan, at $3.00 and 

Girls' Napoleon Lace Shoes — Like lower 
gun metal, sizes 11J4 to 2; special, per 
pair 



$2.25 

center cut, 

$3.00 
$3.50 

•er cut, in 

$2.75 



Misses' Box Calf School Shoes 



Blucher style, new broad toes, heavy soles, made 
good and solid throughout, a very stylish and 
well wearing shoe; special per 
pair 



.$L48 



the transom in a bathroom. Mrs. 
Block had gone to the hospital for 
treatment tor a nervous trouble. She 
was a sister of Judge Harry Hoff- 
haimer of this city. 



TWO ARRESTS IN 
MURDER MYSTERY 



"Herb Doctor" and Chauffeur 

Arraigned for Death of 

Woman. 

Fall Ptiver. Mass., Oct. 15. — Wilfrid 
Thibealt and "Prof." Frank Hill, who 
were examined here yesterday In con- 
nection with the Tiverton. R. I., tra- 
gedy, were formally charged with the 
murder of Amelia St. Jean of Woon- 
socket, R. I., In police court here to- 
day. Both pleaded not guilty. The 
case was continued for ten days. 

The men were committed to the Fall 
River jail without bail. Thibault is 28 
years of age and has a wife and two 
children. For the last eighteen montlis 
he has worked as chauffeur for a local 
attorney. Previous to that time he 
worked two years in the office of a 
physician. 

Hill is 44 years old and has a wife 
and one child. He has maintained 
offices as an "herb doctor" here for 
some time. 

Both Knrw the Girl. 

The main evidence on which the men 
are held, according to the police, is 
comprised in admissions said to have 
been made by both that they were 
acquainted with the St. Jean girl and 



that she had taken them into her con- 
fidence on sub.)ects personal to herself. 
Portions of Miss St. Jean's body were 
found wrapped In separate parcels and 
concealed in scattered places along a 
road through a growth of underbrush. 

Don't complain about the cost of 
living. Rartiie-Martin sell groceries 
at w^liolesaie. 



•• STAR •• 

LECTURE COURSE 

ItKSE:HVI<: YOIR .SEATS. 

Saturday. Oct. 16. 1909. 1:30 p. m.. in 
Lecture Room of First M. E. Church. 



AERONAUT HAS 
SERIOUS FALL 



Accident Mars Contests of 

Flying Machines in 

France. 

Juvisy, France. Oct. 15. — At the avia- 
tion exhibition today. Aeronaut Ricli- 
ter fell, with his machine Monitor, 
from a height of fifty feet. He suf- 
fered a broken thigh and the loss of 
an eye. 

WrlKht Flien Some More. 

College Point. Md., Oct. 15. — Two 
flights were made ai the government 
aerodome today. 

For the firat attempt Lieut. Lahm 



climbed Into the seat next to Mr. 
Wright, and a flight of five minutes 
was made. A few minutes later Lieut. 
Humphreys, the other student officer, 
took Lieut. Lahin's place, ard the ma- 
chinf^ was in the air for approximately 
three minutes. During both flights, 
which were made in praciically calm 
air. the officers held their hands on 
the extra set of . levers which Mr. 
Wright placed ort the machine for in- 
struction use. 

Following the i^econd flight the wind 
rose, po.stponing further Instruction. 

OPEN SWITCH 

SEEN IN TIME 

Otherwise Disastrous Wreck 

Might Have Resulted on 

CanadiaDjNorthern. 

Baudette, Illinn.,;''C>ct. 15. — :Special to 
The Herald. )r^The'; discovery by the 
engineer of tHe eAstbound Canadian 
Northern trafn of'^n open switch just 
east of the *"4®P®^4 ^* ^^^ train was 
pulling out A'i-fe'SQdaya ago probably 
preven-ted a disasM)US wreck. 

The train had Started from the 
depot when AgentSMunsey noticed that 
the mall saclf h^ been left behind. 
The train was slgfitiled to s:op and as 
the engineer slowetl down h«t was hor- 
rified to note that^fhe switch the train 
was approacljlng lyas open. Some one 
through mali;fi ftad broken the lock 
and opened the switch. There were 
about 125 passengers on the train and 
there is no telling where most of them 
would have U'J^'X if the train had not 
been stopped*-%t fwe time In was. 



SOON KNOW 
THEIR FATE 

Government Launch Is Search- 
ing for Missing Leech 
Lake Party. 

Squaw Brings in Story of 

Disaster That Is Not 

Credited. 



Walker, Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The government launch 
Ojibwa is making a tour of the lumber 
camps on Leech lake, to ascertain the 
wherebouts of the missing launch, 
Sarah L., which has been absent from 
Walker since early Sunday morning. 

If the searching party does not re- 
turn early this afternoon with definite 
news. It will be a signal that the miss- 
ing boat is not in the harbor at any 
point on the lake, but has gone to the 
bottom, somewhere in the big lake. 

An Indian woman brought in a story 
this morning that the launch had been 
sunk and seven lives lost, but on be- 
ing closely questioned her story was 



shattered considerably and hopes are 
still held here that the party is safe at 
headquarters camp, twenty-five milea 
from Walker. 

The storm continues on the lake 
though not as bad as during the first 
of the week and it Is now possible for 
boats to tour the waters. 

The Ojibwa is a fifty-five-foot trunk 
cabin gasoline boat, capable of weath- 
ering all storm.s, and is in charge of 
.John Oscar government engineer at the 
Leech Lake agency. It will not be be- 
lieved liere that the missing boat has 
met with disaster until after the 
Ojibwa reports the result of the trip. 



The VermUllon Iron DeveIopin>ni Co. 

Have-opened offices at 316-317 Providence Bldg. Work 
on the propertie* will commence at once. A shaft 
will be started on the Pint Island property and dia- 
mond drill on the Murray Homestead. Map, sample* 
and blue prints can be seen at our office. For further 
information address MR. TILTON E. LEWIS. Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 



LAST PAPER MILL AT 

ROCKTON IS BURNED. 



Beloit. Wl.=»., Oct. 15. — The last of a 
number of paper mills at Rockton, 111., 
near here, was destroyed by flre today. 
The loss Is $80,000; insurance, $20,000. 

The origin of the fire is not known. 

Tiie mill was the property of V. K. 
Moody, Chicago, and O. M. Glass of 
Rockton. 



Hermantuvs-a Note*. 

Hermantown, Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The fall ot snow 
has caught many of the farmers with 
their potatoes still in the ground and 
some loss resulted. 

Miss Alma Halvorson Is attending 
the Duluth norma]. 

The Royal Neighbors of America 
will give an ice cream social at Wood- 
man hall Sunday afternoon. 

The Farmers* Progressive club holds 




in- 



its meeting on Sunday afternoon 
stead of Saturday evening. 

William Janzlg, who had his foot 
amputated at St. Mary'.s hospital is ex- 
pected home in about two weeks. 



YEGGS SCARED OFF. 



Make a Second Unsiiieessfnl Attaek 
Upon Holdingford Bank. 

St. Cloud. Minn., Oct. 16. — Some time 
Monday night thieves broke into the 
Farmers' .State bank of Holdingford 
and attempted to rob the safe. At 
first they attempted to make their way 
into the bank by prying the door open 
with a crowbar, but were unsuccessful. 
They then cut the glass out of the 
door and entered in that way. There 
was an inner door to the bank, but 
they easily battered this in and went 
to work on the safe. Evidently they 
were frightened away for they failed 
to open the safe and left a crowbar, a 
pick and two large wrenches lying on 
the floor. No money was taken from 
the bank and nothing was damaged ex- 
cept the two doors through which they 
entered. This is the second attempt at 
bank robbery in the last few davs and 
In both instances the thieves have 
failed to get anything. There Is ab- 
.solutely no clue to their identity. 



Don't complain about the cost of 
living. Barthe-Martin sell grocerlea 
at wholesale. 



$1.25 New Kid Gloves for 89c 



500 pair Ladles' New $1.25 
Glace Kid Gloves, all i>izes. 
pair guaran- 
teed, at the 
great sale to- 
morrow for 
89c. 

20 West Superior Street. 



White 
Every 




"1 



1 
V 

'i; 

r 



^^■■—-■i^F" 



-t 



Ir- 



-t • 



a 



^^»4^ 



iiUK> 



•^IB 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





BERNIER IS B pq™ ^^ D^«„«oi 

WITH CC\C\v\ FREE on Request 

WW I I W\ \J\^\/ MV I l*T9t lUnstraled Cata^ojn; cl These Book Bargains. 



The Long-Looked- 
For Sensatioaal 
Book Announcemsnf. 



Canadian Explorer Believes 

Brooklyn Man Reached 

the Pole. 

Cook Brands BarrilFs Story 

of Mount McKmley Ascent 

as a Ue. 




• . 



Ottawa. Ont., Oct. 15.— Capt. Ber- 
nier, Canada's Arctic explorer. de- 
clares that, judging from all the evi- 
dence published, I>r. Cook has reached 
""'the North Pole and his story was to 
hr Itlieved. 

Speaking of the Peary case against 
Dr. Cook. Capt. Bernler said lie took 
no Slock In Eskimo evidence. They 
deeired to please and would tell any 
story which they thought would be 
agreeable to their listeners. 

Am to the KftkimoM. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 15.— Dr. Cook said 

here yesterday: . .. ^ 

-There is a mistaken impression that 
I am bringing the Eskimos to New 
York to prove that 1 liave been to the 
pole The real reason of tiieir coming 
here is to disprove the story they were 
made to tell by Commander Peary and 
his party. They certainly will assist 
me by giving evidence that they have 
been to the pole with me, but I rely on 
my own data to prove my claims." 

DeuIrM Ilarrill Charges. 

Atlantic City, N. J.. Oct. 1.').— Express- 
ing astonisliment at tlie statement ot 
Edward Uarrlll. Dr. Cook yesterday 
maintained that he had ascended to the 
summit of Mount McKinley and said 
further that if an expedition will fol- 
low the rout« he took, they will find 
the records deposited by him at the 
summit of the mountain. Referring to 
Barrills sworn statement, Dr. Cook 
said to a representative of the Asso- 
ciated Press: 

"I lannot j-eally understand why 
Barrill should have made such a state- 
ment as the newspapers produce, if he 
was acting under normal conditions. 1 
, must say it surprises me. We were al- 
wavs on the most friendly terms. Until 
I know of the conditions under Which 
this alleged affidavit was made, I will 
make no specific reply to it. My ac- 
count of the trip has been published. 
For the present, it is the bald state- 
ment of one man against another. 
OfferM to Prove Hln Cane. 
"If an expedition of experienced 
mountaineers will follow the route that 
I took and will go to the top of Mount 
McKinlev, they will find there the rec- 
ords which 1 deposited on attaining 
the summit of the mountain in the 
manner described in my book 'To the 
Top of tlie Continent.' " 

"I have always had complete con- 
fidence in Barrill and cannot com- 
prehend why he should have sworn to 
such a storv. The fact that Gen. Hub- 
bard is proprietor of the Globe throws 
a light on the affair which was not 
previously apparent. I shall see Bar- 
rill, I hope, when 1 reach New York, 
but 1 do not know when or where. 
Mouey Bcbin,| It. 
"It appears to me tliat there was 
money behind his statement. He was. 
perhaps, annoyed tl.at he had not been 
paid liis wages, but that was not my 
fault, and 1 remedies the matter as 
soon as I got back from the pole." 

•Will vou say that the accusations 
contained in the Barrill affidavit are 
positively untrue?" was the (luestion 
put by a large body of newspaper 
men late last night. The reply was: 
•Decidedly yes. F. A. COOK." 

Mr. Cook, who had previously de- 
clined to commit himself, did not hesi- 
tate a moment when the question was 
placed before him in writing. Dr. 
Cook after midnig'ht said: 

"I never even knew Barrill kept a 
diary. I never saw it. consequently I 
could not have asked him to alter 
anything whatever. Any statement of 
l»is that I suggested the clianging of 
dates and altitudes is a lie." 
■ 
Barrill DenieM Cuok'M Claim. 
New York, Oct. 15. — The Globe prints 
a copy of the affidavit made by Edwin 
N. Barrill, who accompanied Dr. Fred- 
erick A. Cook at the time lie announced 
his reaching the summit of Mount Mc- 
Kinlev. The affidavit was made before 
a notary public at Tacoma, Wash., on 
Oct. 4, and has just been received in 
New York. 

Barrills affidavit states in effect that 
he was the only person with Dr. Cook 
on the date when he claims to have 
reached the summit of Mount McKin- 
ley; that they did not, in fact, reach the 
summit, and the nearest point to the 
summit reached was at least four 
miles distant from the summit of that 
mountain, the elevation at no time ex- 
ceeding 10,000 feet. Barrills affidavit 
also brings into question a number of 
the photographs which Dr. Cook has 
given as representing the summit and 
other high altitudes of Mount McKin- 
ley. 

Barrills affidavit .^ays that he is the 
one referred lo as Barrille or Edward 
Barrllle in Dr. Cook's book entitled "To 
the Top of the Continent," bearing 
upon the expedition to Mount McKin- 
ley. He details his first meeting with 
Dr. Cook at Missoula, where the latter 
was accompanied by Prof. Parker of 
Columbia university. It. W. Porter and 
others. 

Barrill recounts that at the start of 
the trip iie prepared to keep an exact 
dfary, and sets forth that this diary, 
marked Exhibit A, attached to the affi- 
davit, "is a pocket diary kept by me 
during all the time that Dr. Cook and 
I were together near Mount McKinley, 
and the same is a truthful record, with 
the exception of tlie entries and 
. changes made by me therein under the 
orders of Dr. Cook." 

The diarv referred to by Barrill as 
attached to the affidavit is now in the 
possession of the New York Globe. 
■ 
BackM I p Barrill. 
Seattle. Wash.. Oct. 15. — Waller H. 
Miller photographer of the Cook ex- 
pedition to Mount McKinley in 1906, 
made an affidavit yesterday which 
ft-as published by the Seattle Times, in 
wlilch he explained his relation to the 
ex'ied'tion and then said: 

"I-rom the time Cook and Barrill 
lefi us at the head waters of the 
Yentna. when Printz and I started on 
our hunting trip, until we met them at 
i?ifritaria station, Sept. 22, I know noth- 
ing, cf tlieir movements except what 
was told me by Barrill. 

••Whenever 1 asked Barrill concern- 
ing the ascent he always referred me 
to Cook. 'Ask the doctor about it,' he 
woulw say. •He told me not to say 
anything about it.' 

"Cook told the story of the ascent 
to us several times on tlie way out. 
Later I met Barrill in Missoula, where 
he told me the facts of the trip. He 
said neither he nor Dr. Cook made the 
summit of Mount McKinley. and point- 
ed out to me on tlie map the different 
camps and the point which Cook 
rlaimed was the summit of Mount Mc- 
Kinley. This point is fully twenty 
miles from the summit. 

"A fortnight ago I was asked by 
an attorney for an exploration club 
with headquarters in New York to 
bring Barrill and Printz to Tacoma for 
the purpose of making affidavits as 
to the actual facts as to the trip to 
Mount McKinley. These affidavits have 
been made." 

Don't complain about the cost of 
Jiving. Barthe-Martin sell groceries 
at wholesale. 

■ 

Things of value that have fallen into 
disuse should be turned into money — 
which never falls into disuse. Use for 
sale ad. 



— r 



Editions de Luxe Almost Given Away! 




m jva f f I Bv Martha James. The Wittiest Book of the 

iVIinT llll#^Tl' Season. A humorous story of New England 
IT****^ *#*41^|^« lifp full of irresistible drollery, quaint 
sayings, and unusual doings. Beautiful Gift Edition, with six full 
page illustrations in colors from originals by Regi- ^^ 1 /\ 
nald F. Bolles. Ornamental cloth. Pub. Price. 12.50. ^D 1 « X II 
Gold tops. For sale exclusively at our store — Price ^ 



About One-Fourtli Publisliers' Prices! 




1 Booi( Sale Ever Known 



This is the culmination of well-known panic conditions in the Subscription Book Trade. Some big publishing failures are known to the public, but only bankers 
and others on the inside understand the extensive financial difficulties which have caused this enormous Forced Sale. At the inflated Subscription Prices $6,000,000 
worth of Fine de Luxe Editions were recently thrown upon the market by leading Subscription Publishers, Printers and Binders, who were compelled to unload at any 
price to raise money. A Subscription Publishers Clearing House was formed to distribute the enormous stocks among leading houses m large cities. We bought 
heavily, securing the entire allotment for this city, and therefore we offer these Superb Editions exclusively here. „„_,,.,. „ . ^ ^, 

The sale comprises de luxe publications of many houses, including Bigelow. Smith & Co., The Davos Press, Gebbie & Co., The Nottingham Society and The 
Chesterfidd Society Under the two last mentioned imprints were re-issued from the same plates the fine de luxe sets of staridard authors formerly published and 
extensively sold through agents by John D. Morris & Co., Philadelphia. All the best sets advertised widely in magazines and sold by agents at high prices, you 11 
'rnd r^ght here at astonishing bargain prices. You can now get three or four magnificent sets for the subscription price of one. Select the favorite authors you 
want and enjoy the possession of a fine private library, a creditable ornament in your home and a good investment m every way. 



Only About 25c on $1 



Remember, these are not ordinary trade sets sold 
everywhere, but genuine de luxe bargains offered ex- 
clusively by us in this city. 



The Booklover*s Chance of a Life Time 



^ Kipling ! 

New Illustrated Edition de Luxe of 
Kipling's Standard Works, as follows: 
1 Plain Tales from the Hills; 2. The 
Lisht That Failed: 3. Mine Own People; 
4 Soldiers Three: 5. The Phantom 
Kickshaw; 6. Under the Deodars; 7. 
Wee Willie Winkle, City of Dreadful 
Night. American Notes; 8. Story of the 
Gadsbys in Black and White; 9. Letters 
of Marque; 10 Poems. Ballads and 
Other Verses. % leather binding. 10 
volumes. 



Sale Price, $9.50 

yub. Price $39.00. 
Same in Cloth. . __ ^^^^ 

Sub pi-ice. $30.00. Sale Price, $7-00 




KIPLING 



Scott! 



In 1814. at the age of 43, Scott pub- 
lished anonymously his first novel 
• Waverley. ■ followed in rapid suc- 
cession by that matchless genes of 
romances, unbroken up to 1829, within 
three years of his death. The world 
kmws what marvelous achievements 
he wrought in that brief span of years. 
What a life cf splendor and misery, 
fame and pathosi Yet his works 
breathe punty, courage, honor, and 

Complete Waverley Novels, limited 
Edition de Luxe, 24 volumes, large 
type, laid paper, 200 illustrations, 
handsome dark green % 'eather bmding. 




Hugo! 

Complete romances, poems, essays, 
best dramas, including Hugo's rar« 
book on Shake8i>eare and lifeof Hu^o, 
In ten handsome volumes. New Edition 
de Luxe from new plates, with 90 il- 
lustrations in photogravure and half 
tone This is tne best and most com- 
plete set of Hugo in English, excepting 
only one other costly edition whicli sells 
at from $100.00 to $500.00 per set. 
Edition limited to 1000 numbered sets. 
Elegantly bound in % leather, de Luxe 
style. 




VICTOR HUGO 



Sub. Price $49.00. 



Sale Price, ^11.50 



Dumas ! 



61B WALTER SCOrrT 



Sub. Price. $100.00. gajg Pricc $26.00 



Dickens! 

While Scott was *Titlng his famous 
romances a boy named Dickens was 
working in a blacking warehouse, teach- 
ing himself shorthand, soon rising to be 
a reporter, and at 28 the most popular 
living writer in ;he world, a popularity 
which he maintained for more than 
thirty years, until his death from n-^ed- 
less overwork. Dickens" works are too 
widely known and loved to require com- 
ment. , _,j. . . 

Fine Limited numbered Edition d« 
Luxe, complete works in 20 volumes, . . ,/ , .v 

large type, fine white wove paper. 160 >lIustraUons, elegant % leather 
binding. 




CHARLES DICKENS 




Alexandre Dumas isdeclareo by (x>untless 
enthusiastic admirers to be the prince of 
romancers He carries along the reader 
breathless with interest, through plots and 
counterplots, ingenius intrigues, humorous 
situations, and never-ending adventures, 
all told with inimitable wit and dialogue. 

Booklovers should not confound this new 
edition de luxe with the numerous very in- 
complete sets of Dumas which omit many 
of his moat brilliant novels. Probably the 
world will never see an absolutely complete 
set of Dumas for it is impossible to discern alHXANDRK DUMAS 
positively all of Dumas own writings from 

those to which he allowed his name to be placed, although written by 
others in the "Dumas Syndicate of Authors." . 

The present new edition, however, contains all of tn« recognized 
masterpieces of Dumas, about IS.OOOpages, and therefore may b« ca led 
practically complete— the most satisfactory set ever issued in English 
—the best translations. 

Illustrated with numerous duotones in two colors, the type, paper 
and presswork are excellent. ,. . i. 

Three-Quarter Leather Binding, marbled sides, full gold backs, 
gold tops. Eighteen volumes. 

Sub. Price, »8o.oo. gale Pricc, $20.50 



Balzac! 



Sub. Price $90.00. Sale Price $25.00 



Thackeray! 



Fine New Edition de Luxe. 

Illustrations include about 150 bril- 
liant duotones, from the originals of 
Brock and other eminent artists, in 
eluding Thackeray's own inimitable 
drawings. There are also 10 photo- 
gravures. Title pages on Japan paper. 

The type is large and clear. The 
saper and presswork first-olass. 

"The binding is a handsome dark 
Three - Quarter Leather, marbled 
sides, gold tops, uncut edges. The 
set is complete in ten volumes. , ^ ^, 




New Saintsbury Edition de Luxe of i 
The Complete Comedie Humaine— The 
best and only unexpurgated scholarly 1 
complete translation. f" 

Balzac treaU of the whole range of 
human emotions, creating over two 
thousand personages, who move through 
the scenes of The Comedie Humaine— 
a complete social world. 

The illustrations include numerous 
photogravures and half-tone rei^oduc- 
tions from original paintings by French 
and English artists. 

Large Type. Superfine paper, hand- 
somely bound In Three-Quarter Leather -^v.^^ 
Marbled Sides and inside cover Immg, Gold Tops. Complete m eighteen 
volumes. 




HONORE 01; BALZAC 



WILUAII MAKEPEACE THACKERAY 



Sub. Price, 



H9.00. Sale Price, $13.50 



Pepy's Diary! 



New Edition de Luxe. 

Printed from new large type, with 100 
full page reproductions in halftone and 
photogravure. 

This entirely new edition should not 
be confounded with sets sold at a simi- 
lar or higher price but which are printed 
from old worn out broken type plates. 

For the first time a limited number of 
booklovers may enjoy at a trifling out- 
lay the same pleasure as the wealthy 
bibliophile who has spent years, and 
perhaps thousands of dollars In collect- 
ing engravings for his beloved Pepys. 

The type is new, larjie and clear, and 
the text is that of the famous Lord Braybrooke edition. 

The paper is a soft white, antique white wove stock, with title pages 
printed on Japanese vellum in two colors. 

The illustrations are printed on plate paper with protecting tissues 
on which the titles and sources of the illustration are given. 

The binding is a luxurious Three-Quarter Persian Leather of a rich 
dark shade, hand tooled, with full gold backs and gold tops, with mar- 
bled sides and linings. This setjs compjete in four volumes. 




Sub. Price. $70.00. S^Jg Pfice, $19.50 



Poe! 



This is a new complete Edition 
de Luxe of Poe's complete Tales, 
Poems. Essays, and Miscellanies— 
the most desirable library edition 
in existence. 

The type is large and clear, text 
page printed carefully, on super- 
fine white wove paper, with excel- 
lent photogravure and_half tone 
illustrations. ?r'nTth;^a;c; crc 
*^»nd =si=r^. Edition limited to 
i.OOO numbered sets. The binding 
'4 leather. Ten volumes. 




EDGAR AUJIN fOt 



Sub. Price, $49.00. g^le PriCC, $12.75 



■Ac.»e« 



PEPYS 



Sub. Price, $2E 



Sale Price, $7.00 



Stevenson! 

This new Edition de Luxe (limited 
and numbered) brings to booklovers 
for the first time an approximately 
definitive edition of Stevenson at a 
moderate price. Heretofore the only 
other good edition has sold at from 
$52.00 to $104.00 per set, moreover this 
new set contains hundreds of pages of 
valuable matter never before presented 
in boak form— not even in the most 
expensive editions. 

The type is a new Scotch style; good 
paper, with portraits and other illus- 
trations from photographs. Ten vols. 
J'i leather binding. 




Hawthorne! 



New Edition de Luxe. Contents of 
the set: "Twice Told Tales." "Mosses 
from an old Manse," "The Scarlet 
Letter," "The House of the Seven Gab- 
les." "Grandfather's Chair," "The 
Wonder Book," "The Blithedale Rom- 
ance," "Tanglewood Tales." "The 
Marble Faun." The type is large and 
clear, printed upon fine white laid 

fiaper made expressly for this edition. 
Ilustrations include frontispiece, duo- 
tones, from originals and a fine new 
photogravure portrait of the author. 
Fine % leather binding. 9 volumes. 

? Sub. Price, $35.00. 

Same in Cloth. 

Sub. Price, $30.00. 




HATHANIEL IHAY/THORNB 



Sale Price, $9.50 
Sale Price, $7.00 



Irving ! 



I 



STEVENSON 



Sub. Price, $39.00. 

Same in Cloth. 

Sub. Price $30.00. 



Sale Price, $10.50 
Sale Price, $8.00 



Smollett ! 

The writings of this classic old novelist 
are famous lor depicting with spirit and 
wit tne free and easy manner of eighteenth 
century life. Smollett deals with the ridic- 
ulous and humorous side of life. Thackeray 
called his "Humphrey Clinker' the roost 
laughable story ever written. The novels, 
' Rod eric k-Pandom . " Peregrlne-Pickle, " 
etc.. excel In original comedy. 

The set contains the complete novels, 
unexpurgated, best text, large tj-pe. fine 
paper, illustrated, six volumes. Edition do 
Luxe, limited, numbered by hand, Ji leather 
binding. 




"The books of Irving, The Founder 
of American Literature, are wholesome, 
full of sweetness and charm, of humor 
without any sting, of amusement with- 
out any stain; and their more solid 
qualities are marred by neither ped- 
antry nor pretension." 

—Charles Dudlep Warner. 

This de Luxe edition deserves special 
attention, as it contains all of Irving's 
writings, with the author's latest re- 
visions and several valuable maps. 
Complete in 10 handsome volumes, 
illustrated with many half tones, photo- 
gravurc portraits and maps. The Paper made expressly for this edition 
IS a very fine white wove and the presswork is of the best quality. 
The type is lar^e and clear. Three-Quarter Leather Binding (dark 
red.) marbled sides and inside cover linings, gold tops, uncut edges. 
silk headbands, Japan title pages in colors. 

Sub. Price, $45.00. gajg Pricc, $12.50 




WASHINGTON IHV1N6 



BMOLLETT 



Sub. Price. $30.00. g^lg PricC, $8.25 



Emerson! 

As man and writer, Emerson ranks 
among the great world-spirits. Strength 
and originality of thought, force and 
brilliancy of expression dominate his 
works. 

Contents of the set, six volumes, "Re- 
presentative Men," "English Traits," 
'Nature Addresses ana Lectures," 
"Conduct of Life." "Essays," "Poems," 
and a biography by Rlcnard Gamett. 

Large type, illustrated, excellent 
paper, bound beautifully in % leather. 
This is a limited Edition de Luxe, each 
set numbered by hand. 




EMICRSON 



Sub. Price, $25.00. galC PricC, $6.50 




Plato! 



It Is indeed true that though written 2,300 
years ago the worksof Plato discuss the very 
same problems that we discuss today and 
stdl rank among the greatest productions of 
the human mind, teachinjt the great truths 
of life with convincing logic and fascinating 
simplicity. Plato is as necessary to a library 
as a foundation to a house. 

This Edition de Luxe in three volumes 
contains the best translations with intro- 
ductions and notes, including: 1. The 
Dialogues. 2. The Republic. 3. Trial and 
Death of Socrates. 

The type is large and clear printed on 
superfine white wove paper. The Illustra- 
tions include photogravures and duotones 
(in two colors) on India plate paper. 

Three-Quarter Leather Binding, gold tops, marbled sides and 'inings, 
silk headbands. Japan vellum titles. 




PLATO 



Sub. Price, $15.00. galC PricC, $4.25 



Taine! 

The History of English Literature 
Illustrated Edition de Luxe in four 
handsome volumes. 

Pres. Butler of Columbia writes: 
"Taine stands head and shoulders 
above the authors of other works on 
English Literature. His estimates 
are Just, his style charniing. You 
cannot get too much of Taine. " The 
entire field is covered by Taine from 
earliest to modern times with illus- 
trative excerpts from great writers, 
with an excellent Index, making this 
an excellent reference work. 

Large type, extra white wove paper, TAINE 

handsomely illustrated with duo- 
tones on India plate paper and photogravure on Japan paper. 

Three-Quarter Leather Binding, marbled sides and linings, Japan 
vellum title pages, gold tops. 

Sub. Price, $21.00. gak Pricc, $6.50 




Plutarch! 

Plutarch's Lives include brilliant biog- 
raphies of the chief personages of Greek 
and Roman history, embracing the six 
huodred eventful years, 500 B.C. to 100 A.D. 
Shakespeare himself drew ideas and char- 
acters from Plutarch, and so hayecountlMS 
other writers. Emerson says cannot be 
spared from the smallest library.— his lives 
are as entertaining as a French novel. 

Edition de Luxe, five volumes, limited 
and numbered, large type, good paper. Illus- 
trated, durably bound in beautiful style, ?4 
genuine leather. 

Sub. Price. $22.50. 




PLUTARCH 

Sale Price, $6.00 



Guizot's France! 

Translated by Robert Black, whoso 
translation is recognized as the most 
authoritative wherever the English lan- 
guage is spoken. 

Here is a great history which gives a 
vivid and truthful account of events, 
couched in simple and direct language. 

This de Luxe Edition is the complete 
work, in 8 volumes, printed from large 
type on excellent paper with portraits and 
historical scenes reproduced in photo- 

fravure and half tone. Three-ouarter 
lark Levant Grain Leather, gold tops, 
marbled sides and linings. 




ttutZOT 



Sub. Price, $35.00. 



Sale Price, $9.50 



Green's England! 

New Edition de Luxe of The History 
of The English People from earliest times, 
with a continuation to the year 1909, in- 
cluding an introduction by the author's 
widow Alice Stopford Green. 

Countless editions of this work have 
been issued because it is the only 
readable standard work on the subject. 
Previous editions however have been 
incomplete, ending with the year 1815. 
In the present beautiful de luxe set the 
history is completed to the year 1909 
making it the best and only complete 
BUllioritative history of England. 

Large type, printed on superfine paper. 
Illustrated with photoj»ravures on Japan , j. , . 

paper and duotones printed in two colors on India plate paper. 
Five volumes. 

Sub. Price. $25.00. galc pricC, $ 7.00 




GREEN 



T 



Dante! 



^ The Divine Comedy, Best translation 
by Longfellow with voluminous notes 
and introductions. Printed from lar^e 
new type handsomely illustrated in 
duotone colors, 44 full page plates. 
The best edition of Dante. 

Durably bound in cloth. Complete 
in i volumes. 

u Sub. Price. $6.00. 

Sale Price, $3.25 

Same in % leather, 

extra de Luxe. 
Sub. Price. $25.00 

Sale Price, $7.00 




DANTE 




REV MR LAURENCE STERNE. 



» i I I I 




Eliot! 



Description of this Edition de Luxe. The 
present complete text is admirable in 
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Gibbon's Rome! 



The Decline and Fall of the Roman 
Empire covering the period from the 
death of Julius Caesar and the down- 
fall of the Republic, through thirteen 
centuries, to the fall of Constantinople. 
"Whatever else is read. Gibbon must be 

read, too. , ^ , , , .. 

New Edition de Luxe, the only large 
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This famous standard work tells 
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r^, 



Longfellow! 



I 




LONGFELLOW 



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The notes. In addition to th» author s 
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It should be stated here that there is no absolutely complete set ol 
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because of certain copyright restrictions is "The Hanging of the Crane 
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to a great deal of Longfellow g prose and poetical writings not obtain- 
able in any other edition. For example, we have here for the first time 
in book form "The Bald Eagle" and "The Indian Summer, two bril- 
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6 



THE DULUTH EVENING HE^RA^: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



U. S. Army Man Says: 

"Invigorating Stimulant" 

Mr. Horace R. Butts, Providence, 
R. I., a U. S. Army man, many 
years ago on account of the 
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During my twenty-four years of 
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ago. Since then I have not been 
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MR. HORACE K. BUTTS. mcud it to all who are in need of 

an invigorating stimulatit and desirous of building up their system." Horace R. P.utts, 50 Grandview 
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BULL TERRIER 
SCARES ROBBER 

"Tip" Saves His Mistress 
Who Was at a Re- 
volver's Point 

Indianapolis. Ind.. Oct. 15.— The bluff 
of Tip. a bull terrier and family pet, at 
the liome of Dr. J. S. Hullins^worth 
saved Mrs. HoHlngswortii from being 
robbed after Iier husband had been 
lured away from home on a fake call 
early Sunday morning. For eleven 
years Tip ha.s been fighting all the 
dogs that get into the Holllngsworth 
neigliborhood, but his experience with 
the burglar was the fir.st of the kind. 
About 1 o'clock a man stopped at the 
home of Dr. Hoilingswortli and rang 
the floor bell violently, and in a man- 
ner that indicated he wais in a hurry to 
arouse tlie physician. 

When Dr. HoHingsworth appeared at 
the door the stranger asked him to go 
at once to the home of the Hagerty 
family to attend an urgent case. The 
man said the stork was contemplating 
a visit. He also told the physician 
that his fee would be awaiting him if 
he made haste. 

Dr. Hollingswortli knew where the 
Hagerty family lived, but because of 
a slight suspicion the physician asked 
tjuestions concerning the location of 
the house. The stranger described the 
house and disarmed the physician if his 
suspicions. The stranger departed, and 
the physician hurriedly dressed and 
went away, leaving his wife alone in 
the house. 

He had been gone only a few mo- 
ments when the door bell again rang 
and Mrs. Holllngsworth went to the 
door. She opened it a few inches and 
asked the man at the door what he 
wanted. 

••Did the doctor go to the Hagerty 



home?" he asked. 

•'Yes; he's been gone about ten min- 
utes." replied the woman. 

The robber then pushed the door and 
put his foot before it In such a man- 
ner that Mrs. Holllngsworth could not 
close it. Tliey struggled with the door 
for an instant and the woman was 
forced back. ^ ^ :, ... 

•'Wliat do you want?' demanded the 
frightened woman. 

••I want your money and I want it 
fjuick, " the robber said, and with that 
he seized her by the throat and choked 

her- 

'We have onlv a little money in the 
house and I'll get it for you," Mrs. 
Hollingswortli told the robber, and he 
released her and allowed her to back 
aw.'iv. With a remark that she would 
have to turn on the lights, Mrs. Hol- 
llngsworth pressed the buttons on a 
switch and lighted the electric lights 
in the hall and on the veranda. 

At that instant Tip came bounding 
into the room, attracted by the wom- 
an's screams. When he saw the burglar 
Tip's hair bristled on his shoulders and 
back and he emitted a growl that 
would sap the courage of the average 
man. and the robber must have been 
an average man in point of courage. 
He backed toward the closed door, 
holding his revolver toward the dog. 
Mr.s. Holllngsworth noticed this symp- 
tom of fear and she had a slight hope. 

"Look out for the dog.' she e.x- 
claimed, pretending the danger was 
great. 

By that time the robber had his dis- 
engaged hand on the door latch and he 
drew It back and opened the door. He 
stepped out and a moment later he was 
running east on Oliver avenue. 

In the meantime Dr. Holllngsworth 
had gone to the Iliver Avenue house, 
and when he ascertained from the oc- 
cupants that he had not been sent for 
he understood the ruse of the robber 
and started for home on the run. Mrs. 
Holllngsworth, badly frightened, used 
the telephone and called Dr. O. L. 
Deitch, who lives half a block away, 
and Dr. Deitch hurried to the Holllngs- 
worth home. However, Dr. Deitch and 
he found his wife on the veranda al- 
most prostrated from fear. In telling 
of her experience Mrs. Holllngsworth 
said: 

"Tip Is such a bluffer. He was never 
known to bite any one in his life, and 
I doubt if lie would have bitten the 
burglar. But he saved me by growl- 



ing and showing fight." With that Mrs. 
Holllngsworth allowed Tip to jump 
upon her lap and be caressed. 

"He can whip any dog that comes 
in the neighborliood," Interposed Dr. 
Holllngsworth proudly. 'He's 11 years 
old and a fighter." 



Will Probably Be Scramble 

Among Publishers to 

Secure Them. 



London, Oct. 15. — London publishers 
will be tumbling over one another to 
secure the book of remini.scences which 
the former sultan, Abdul Hamfd. is re- 
ported to be writing, for the work is 
sure to have a phenomenal circulation. 

Another literary prize of a similar 

character is "Servia and the Servians." 

supervised and largely written by King 

I'eier of Servia. A few years ago a 

look bv a king would have created a 
sensation but nowadays it is quite the 
fasihion lor royalty to ru.-ih Into print. 
It 13 catitr, in fact, to name the roy^l- 
liei. who do WTfite than those who don't. 
For o.ample, ^he German emperor has 
pioduced plays and poems. Tlie queen 
of lioumania is a poet, dramatist, 
i;i>vi'ii.>ft and magazine contributor. Tlie 
quten ot Italy and the emperor of 
Japan are poets. The queen of Spain 
!iii.> wiitten a play, the king of Italy 
I.S ti.e author of a book on numis- 
p..ttics, the queen of Portugal is a 
novelist, tlie prince of Moraco publislies 
ui>i-ks on marine science, and the late 
i^iincr Henry of Battenberg: compiled 
historical au^ autobiographical mem- 
oirs. ■' ' 

Not the lieast of the czE.r's talents is 
a prttty faculty for writing verse. His 
compositiorttr ai'e invarlab y melanchol- 
ic in tone. and,, are pervaded by an 
overwhelming sense of fatalism. Five 
years ago the ekar betrayed liis deep 
despair in a set of verses, which he 
published under the pseudonym of Olaf. 
The grand duke of Hesst set them to 
music and they made a weirdly mourn- 
ful song. In other verses his pre- 
dominant note iw one of religion. How- 
ever, only one of this imposing crowd 
rises to p»ofes.s\pnal level — the queen 
of Rouma&ia.^ \v8iose writings would 
earn for lier a respectable living, even 
if the accident of politics had not made 
her a queen. 

Tlie kaiser's literary productions 
comprise part songs for students, the 
libretto for Weber's opara "Oberon" 
and the scenario of a ballet. The dow- 
ager queen of Portugal's claim to be 
regarded as a novelist is based on a 
number of society rommces, giving 
vivid pen pictures of Portugal's upper 
ten, which she has published under the 
nom de plume of Chilosa. 

Story of Ollhrrt White. 

"The Natural History of Selborne," 
of which almost IBO editions have 
been published, probably has been as 
much written about as "The Compleat 
Angler." but not until -ecently have 
We known mucli about Gilbert White 
himself. Rashleigh HoH-White, in a 
life of the naturalist, just published, 
■irelates a pl^iasing story of the kindly 
clergyman, his man, Thomae, and a 
broken glass. 

"'Broke a glass, Thomas. How did 
you do that?"* 

"'I'll show you,' sir,' he rejoined, as 
he disappeared for a moment. Return- 
ing witli a glass In his hand, he let 
it fall on the ll0i>r. remarking, 'That's 
how I broke It, .sir.' 

"'There. g:o along, Thomas; you are 
a gpeat fool,' said his master, adding 
to liimself, "And 1 as great a one for 
asking sucli a foolish question.' " 

Tliomas, though an admirable gard- 
ener, do#«" seem to have been a little 
dull. u.ile couldn't tell i:he difference 
in smell — at least so he :said — between 
Gilbert White's home-made raisin 
wine and brandy. One never reads 
anything about Gilbert White without 
recalling Richard Jeffrie.s' lament. 

"He knew the farmers and the 
squires; he had access everywhere, 
and he had the quickest of eyes. It 
must ever be regretted that he did 
not leave a natural history of the 
people of his day." 

WltticlHin by Sliaw. 

George Bernard Shaw rarely allows 
a premier of one of his plays to pass 
without a comrtientatory witticism. His 
latest Shavlanism is apropos the pro- 
duction of a mtitical ver.sion of "Arms 
and the Man." 

"If a New. .Yor.k first-right audience 
can appreciate tills open they are to 
he congratulated," he sad. The char- 
acteristically left-handed compliment 
recalls his dln*er table reference ti 




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NEVER ABSENT OR LATE. 

Girl Finishes Twelve Years 
School With This Record. 

Carthage, Mo., Oct. 15. — Twelve 
years at. school and never absent or 
tardy during a school attendance Is a 
record to be proud of. Miss Pauline 

Roach, 17 years old, of Carthage, 
frankly acknowledges that she does 
feel a bit gratified at having such a 
scliool report. 

Other girls were graduated with as 
good a record as hers, but none was 
graduated with the same record. Dur- 
ing her high school life Miss Roach 
was forced to rise early, owing to the 
fact that she "put out the mail" for 
her father, who was editor and pro- 
prietor of the Carthage Democrat, a 
morning daily. There was not work 
enough for a man, and no boy could 
be found who wanted the job. Then 
if anything went wrong v^ith the car- 
rier service, slie was on liand to help 
out. So many a time it was close on 
to 9 o'clock when she had finished. But 
by dint of hard work she got to school 
on time. 

In some respects Miss Roach has 
been specially fortunate. When the 
whooping cough, the measles. the 
mumps and the chlckenpox were "go- 
ing round" she invariably managed to 
"take" these juvenile diseases in vaca- 
tion times, or it she met with some 
slight accident, such as twisting her 
ankle or spraining her foot it would 
occur between Saturday and Monday 
mornings, thus, as It were, guarding 
against any further contingency aris- 
ing from such afflictions. Miss Roach 
lays great stress upon early morning 
horseback rides and long games of 
tennis, as well as basketball. She be- 
lieves they have helped her to become 
the strong, healthy, robust girl that 
she 1^. 




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COLD WEAT 





iiMier 
MaJ. Bai:bara4f5 

tf«<#j 'Maj. 



"Have you 
asked his fellow 



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Barbara'' 
diner 

"Why, yes. of course, t have." 

"What, even the last a<;t?" 

"Yes, even that." 

"Well, replied Mi*. Shaw, "that -s 
more than I tan say. 1 myself have 
never been able to sit it through." 

When "Arms and the Man" was first 
produced in New York, an American 
manager cabled Mr. Shaw a report on 
its success. Shaw telegraphed back: 

"Keep calm. My plays always suc- 
ceed with first-rate actinsf." 

An amu.sing sequel to this was his 
reply to some London amateurs who 
wished to produce "You Never Can 
Tell." He wrote: 

"Dear Sir: Amateurs cannot per- 
form my plays. Professionals can- 
not unless I am there to help them. 
Bv all means do it if you want to, 
but God help the audience." 

"Arms and the Man" seems to have 
inspired Shaw with some of his best 
moments. Nothing could have been 
happier than his observation after its 
first production at the Avenue, now 
the Plavhouse. At the end of that his- 
toric evening, he appealed before the 
curtain in response to repeated calls. 
He seemed embarrassed, however, until 
a loud and solitary hiss »!manated from 



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Death of Criminals on Guillotine 
Leads to Pi'otest in France. 

Paris, Oct. 15. — The execution of 
three criminals by the guillotine at 
Drome has led to the usual protests 
against the publicity of executions. 
The behavior of the crowd, the pub- 
lication of photographs of the execu- 
tion and the wide publicity given to 
all the details of the affair, notably 
the effrontery with which the misera- 
ble men endeavored to brazen out thei« 
hift minutes, have roused a general 
protest. It Is pointed out that theso 
exhibitions only serve to defeat their 
purpose, since the criminal has a last 
chance of appearing as a hero, while 
the spectators can only be brutalized 
by them. 

It is reported that the government 
is determined to carry the law abolish- 
ing public executions through the two 
chambers. 



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the gallery. That cheered him. He 
Looked up. He had found opposition. 

"I quite agree with you, ' he said, 
"but what are we two among so 

Mr. 'shaw's satire is not always con- 
fined to his own productions. A fair 
companion sitting be.side him in the 
fetalis of a certain iheater remarked: 

-Don't you think the company play 
splendidly? They have been acting to- 
gether for eleven years." corr 

'Eleven years." repeated Sha^v. 
"Haven't we been here longer than 

that?" 

Letter by William MorHs. 

In the Beautiful World, the occa- 
sional journal of the Society for Check- 
ing the Abu.ses of Public Advertising, 
is a hitherto unpublished letter by tlie 
famous Socialist and poet, VV illlam 
Morris. 

"I fear." he wrote, "that there would 
be no slightest chance of success in at- 
tempting to tax (and thereby regulate ) 
advertisements, except in the stieetj,, 
where they are much less offensive 
than along the railways. You must 
remember that the advertisements you 
are speaking of are always on P"vate 
property, and tliat in consequence it 
would be a lovoHUionary act to meddle 
with them. To tell you the plain truth, 
much as they annoy me personally. 1 
cannot help rejoicing at the spectacle 
of the middle classes «o annoyed and su 
helpless before the results of the idiot- 
ic tyranny which they themselves have 

'^'^Morrls then advises them that if they 
wish to carry out a successful agita- 
tion they must get "very respectable 
oeoDle" e. g., the archbishop ofCan- 
ferbury, the president of the Royal 
academy, etc.. to put themselves to 
real inconvenience in showing how 
much they dislike these nuisances. 

•My influence," he added, "would be 
of no use, as. of course, it is perfects 
well known that 1 am disgusted by 
such things; and as I need not tell >ou 
1 am considered unpractical and known 
to be a S ocialist." 

NEW STEEL iMILLS IN OHIO. 

Ten Millions Will Be Spent By Car- 
negie Company. 

Pittsburg. Pa.. Oct. 15.— The Carneg'e 
Steel company has decided on Improve- 
ments and new mills In the vicinity of 
Youngstown, Ohio, to cost about $10.- 
000,000. The first move was made 



known a "few days ago, when 400 acres 
of land near Glrard. Ohio, were pur- 
chased as a site for new mills to en- 
large the Ohio steel plants of the com- 
pany. 

In addition, the Carnegie company 
intends to i>'Jt up soine new finishing 
mills. The compmy will establish fi 
hot metal route from Niles. Ohio, to 
these plants, making the Ohio chain 
of mills fullv as important as those 
at Homestead. Braddock or Duquesne 
In the Pittsburg district. 

WAITED ALL NIGHT FOR FISH. 



Angler Who Hooked Fighting Sal- 
mon Wouldn't Give Up. 

London, Oct. 15. — A prominent mem- 
ber of the Liverpool Flj,;, Fishing club 
went angling in the River Wyre at 
Garstang last Wednesday. He did not 
return to dinner in the evening, and 
his friends thought of all the terrible 



things that might have befallen him. 
and trembled. 

Time went on and midnight ap- 
proached, but still no sign of the 
angler. So his friends formed a 
search party and, armed with lanterns, 
set out along tlie river side. 

At length tliey came upon him. hold- 
ing on like grim deatii to a magnifi- 
cent salmon. He had hooked the 
fish early in the evening, but. his rod 
being a liglit one. lie had been unable 
to land It. Darkness came on; still the 
salmon struggled gallantly, and still 
the angler v.as determined not to go 
home without It. So he sat down on 
the bank and decided to wait for the 
morning, when perhaps the flsh would 
give up. 

But before the dawn his friends had 
found him. and they helped htm to 
hol.st In the refractory salmon. "I 
never anticipated such a delightful ex- 
perience." he told his would-be res- 
cuers as he bore off his prize in 
triumph. 




FOR 
RHEUMATISM 



Rheumatism is in reality an internal inflammation; a diseased condi- 
tion of the blood cells which supply the nourishment and strength necessary 
to sustain our bodies. The disease is caused by an excess of uric acid la 
the blood, which comes from indigestion, weak kidneys, constipation, and 
other irregularities of the system. This uric acid produces an Inflamed 
and acrid condition of the blood, and the circulation, instead of nourishing 
the different portions of the body, continually deposits into the muscles. 
nerves, joints and bones, the irritating and pain-producing acid with which 
It is filled. Then follow the painful and torturing symptoms of Rheumatism. 
We do not claim for S. S. S. that it is anything more than a first class blood 
purifier, and that is just what is needed to cure Rheumatism. S. S. S. goes 
into the circulation, and by neutralizing the uric acid and driving it from 
the blood, effectually and surely removes the cause of Rheumatism. 8.S.3. 
strengthens and invigorates the blood so that instead of a weak, sour 
stream, causing pain and agony throughout the system, it becomes an 
invigorating, nourishing fluid, ftimishing health and vigor to every portion 
of the body, and permanently relieving the suffering caused by Rheumatism. 
S.S.S. is purely vegetable and will not injure the most delicate systenu 
Book on Rheumatism and any medical advice free to all who write. 

THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO.. ATLANTA, GA. 




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THE UULUTH EVENING HERALD 



Makes Body Magnet 
Nerves Like Steel 



Remarkable Discovery That Gives In- 
tense Nerve Strength by Electric 
Current Through the Body. 



tiOTt Obtainable at DruK Store* and Ab- 
■ulutely Cauamteed. 



Wt 



t 




-i 



seen 



Wonder of wonders, will they ever 
cease? For years inventors have made 
flyinK machines without being able to 
fly with them, — until recently. So sci- 
entists for years have had electricity, 
tut the mystery has been how to apply 
It for medical purposes to produce the 
best results. It is now no longer a 
mystery. 

Now comes the Electropodes which 
turn the human body into what might 
be described as a magnet so stealthily 
that tiie current cannot be felt even by 
the person who is using them, yet pro- 
duiing such a powerful force as to turn 
the weakest nerves into vigorous 
•whipcords." and put an end to some 
of the most obstinate diseaues. 

The simplicity of Electropodes, as 
well as their results, are almost in- 
credible. They have an astonishing ef- 
fect on nerve weakness, brain lag, loss 
of ambition, courage and energy, loss 
of memory and especially on nervous 
prostration. For rheumatism, neural- 
gia, kidney trouble, backache, weak 
heart, liver and stomach troubles they 
have already wrought wonders. 

Electri'podes are worn in the shoes. 
Aside from this they bear no resem- 
blance to any insolts you have ever 
jr hoard about. You 
know you iiave them 
md they differ from all 
L-r electric appliances 
tliat they make no 
•urrent until both 
slioes are put on. 
Then they make a 
magnet of the body. 
with the nerves for 
connecting wires and 
1 a vital glow of elec- 
Itrical force seems to 
be distributed over 
the whole body, 
giving vigor and 
strength which is re- 
■ niarkable. 

To make this state- 
ment good every pair 
of Electropodes are 
sold under a legal 
binding contract tliat 
vou are to be fully 
satisfied at the end 
of 30 days, or your 
money will be re- 
I'linded. 

Electropodes are 
sold at your drug- 
gist's at $1.00 a pair, 
and if you are not 
satisfied with them 
according to contract your money will 
be cheerfully refunded. If your drug- 
gist does not have Electropodes on 
hand, send 51.00 to the Electropode 
Companv. Suite 57, Holland Block. 
Lima. Ohio, and you will get a pair by 
return mail with a signed contract to 
fully satisfv you. or positively reiund 
your money. Say whether for lady or 
gentleman. 



WILL MAKE 
CONFUSION 

Much Trouble Ahead If Eng- 

hsh Lords Reject the 

Budget. 

liberals Inclined to Let die 

Tories Find a Way 

Out. 




Farmers Sne Railroad. 

Moorheail. Minn., Oct. 15.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — A number of farm- 
ers and property owners at Hawley 
and vicinity have instituted suits for 
damages against the Northern Pacific, 
the complainants alleging that the new 
embankment at the east side of Haw- 
ley was not properly constr\icted, and 
not sufficient outlet for water pro- 
vided. It is generally known con- 
siderable damage was done in this vi- 
cinitv bv the big flood of last August 
and the owners of the land think that 
the company is liable. The several 
sums in tlie claims which have been 
filed aggregate about $7,000. 





Nephew Doctored for Fifteen Years 
but Got No Benefit— Finally Tried 
Cuticura Remedies and was Per- 
manently Cured— Uncle Similarly 
Cured Five Years Ago. 

ONE CURE BY CUTICURA 

LEADS TO ANOTHER 

. — « 

" About five years ago I was burneu 
In ai. explosion of natural ga.«. My head 
and face, also my hands 
and arms, were burned. 
About three weeks 
after, eczema set in 
over the parts of my 
body which were 
burned and my physi- 
cian undertook to cure 
it by administering a 
'solution of arsenic, in- 
creasing the doses, but 
without any percepti- 
ble benefit. I was grad- 
ually losing strength 
from the suffering and 
I wa«! in a very serious 
condition. 
" About that time my nephew told 
me about his experience with the Cuti- 
cura Remedies. He had eczema so se- 
verely that the blood ran down into hia 
■hoes'. He suffered with the eczema for 
many vears and had tried everything 
the physicians could prescribe. After 
doctoring for fifteen years, in which time 
he found no relief, he was finally mduced 
to try the Cuticura Remedies, and they 
cured him permanently in four months. 
•'You can easily believe that I made 
haste to trv them' on his recommenda- 
tion. I commenced using the Cuticura 
Soap and Cuticura Ointment. I waa 
cured in les.s than two months so per- 
fectly that I have not even had a symp- 
tom of the disease since, although it is 
over five years since the trouble began. 
I give this testimonial voluntarily, with- 
out solicitation or hope of reward, except 
that some one seeing it may be relieved 
from suffering^ as I was. G. T. Hamil- 
ton, Indiana.^a.. Dec. 15 and 24, 190S. 

For thirty vears Cuticura Soap and 
Cuticura Ointment have afforded speedy 
relief to tens of thousands, of skin-tor- 
tured and disfigured sufferers from eo- 
reraas. rashes, itchings, irritations and 
chaflngs, from infancy to age, bringing 
ctjmfort and peace to distracted house- 
holds when all else failed. 

Cuticura Rpmedloa are sold tbrouchouf the world. 
Potter Dru',' .ind rheni. Corr".. Hole Props . Boston, 
MaM o»-Malled Free. 32-pa«e book on trcattnen* 
AOd ctu* ol torturtus. dlafiguiUig skw Uiseates. 



London, Oct, 15. — One of the most 
perplexing problems in connection with 
the present agitation against Lloyd- 
George's socialistic budget is that 
raised by the disorganization which 
will be caused in various lines of busi- 
ness if the house of lords decides to 
throw out the budget bill, as it now 
seems very likely it will do. 

In America a new tax .does not take 
effect until it is formally passed into 
law by congress, and more often than ! 
not a period of grace is allowed before 
the tax goes into operation. In Eng- | 
land It is the custom for the new taxes i 
to go into operation the moment the i 
budget bill is introduced in liie house 
of commons, and the taxes are collect- 
ed from that moment. Under the old 
tradition that the house of lords had 
no right to interfere with finance, the 
taxes have been paid without question 
and no trouble has arisen over what 
seems to be a rather unbusinesslike 
method of procedure. 

Now, however, the country is faced 
by an entirely novel situation. The 
budget bill was introduced more than 
three months ago, and millions of dol- 
lars have been collected in taxes. It 
tlie budget is thrown out by the lords, 
every penny of these taxes will have 
been collected Illegally, and no one 
knows what will happen. Every house- 
wife in England will be entitled to de- 
mand from her grocer a refund of 10 
cents for every pound of tea she has 
bought since the introduction of the 
bill, and every smoker will have a 
right to demand that his tobacconist 
give him back 1 cent for every ounce 
of tobacco he has smoked. Topers will 
want a cent back on every glass of 
whisky they have drunk, and beer 
drinkers will want the difference be- 
tween the big glass of the pre-budget 
days and tlie little glass which is 
served to them now. Of course, the 
traders will want the money back from 
the government, and as it has been 
spent already, they will find it rather 
difficult to secure the refunds. 
MuMt IteviKe DlvideudH. 
Every public company in England 
which iias paid a dividend since the in- 
troduction of the bill will have to re- 
vise its books and send out additional 
checks, for dividends in England are 
paid "less income tax," and the income 
tax has been deducted on the increased 
scale provided for by the budget. 

Far more important than this is the 
situation in which the government will 
find itself. It will have no legal au-J 
thority for raising money, and the sal- 
aries of the public servants will not be 
provided for. The army and navy are 
provided for by special bills every year, 
and the money for these services will 
not be affected, but tlie vast army of 
civil servants may conceivably have 
to whistle fur tiieir pay. 

All sorts of e.vpedients have been 
suggested by politicians and public 
men to meet this strange situation. 
The favorite one is that parliament 
sliould pass a short bill legalizing the 
e.xtra taxes which have been collected 
already and providing for the contin- 
uance of the old taxes, about which 
there is no dispute. Tliis would solve 
a great part of tlie difficulty and would 
at the same time obviate all tlie dis- 
turbance which might be caused by 
the demand of customers that retailers 
should refund to tliem extra taxes 
already paid, but it would not go far 
enough. The government has commit- 
ted itself to many expensive schemes 
whicli it was relying on the new taxa- 
tion to pay for, and in many cases of- 
ficials have been appointed for the 
new services. Their salaries would, of 
course, not be provided for. 

.MiKht Hit the Torle«. 
There is already a possibility that 
the Liberal government, enraged over 
the refusal of the house of lords, at 
the dictation of the Tories, to pass the 
budget, might refuse to pass the ncces- 
sarv legalizing bill and take the at- 
titude that the Tories, having got the 
country into a financial mess, might 
find a way to get it out again. 

Another plan is that the chancellor 
of the exchequer should raise the mon- 
ey by loan, leaving it to his successor 
to find the money to repay it. This is 
also open to the objection that the 
great London bankers to whom he 
would have to apply are to a man 
opposed to his policies, and probably 
would make terms which would be 
practically prohibitive. Moreover, such 
a loan would have to amount to |250,- 
000,000 at least, and any attempt to 
llcat such an enormous amount In the 
present state of the money market 
would cause such a slump in the value 
of government securities as would 
amount almost to a panic. 

Altogether it is a very Interesting 
situation, and there doesn't seem to be 
any J. P. Morgan in this co-.:ntry to 
ccmft to the rescue oT the government. 

NOT LOOKING 

FOR MATCHES 



Mike Brown Has No De 

sire to Mix in 

Duluth. 

Mike Brown, the newsboy fighter, 
who has won several preliminary bat- 
tles in his whole life, was seen upon 
the streets of our fair city yesterday, j 
clothed in a radiant smile and a new ; 
suit of fall clotlies. Where has Michael i 
been and what has he been doing? It | 
would be the regulation stuff to state 
that Mike was looking for matches. He 
is not — in these parts. With Messrs. 
Whitehead and Gunthcr worrying their 
strong young nerves away in durance 
vile, Mike has no yearning desire to 
mix in this part of the country. He is 
merely trav eling. 

LEGAL LORE FOR 
BANK EMPLOYES 



at 

"R. & R." and 
complete stock 
•1.50, $1.00, 75c 

and 




Warner's 
Corsets 



A new shipment of "Rust-Proofs" 
received — no better Corsets 
made that sells C| QQ 



other Corsets, 
of sizes — f2.00, 

50c 




You Should See Our 

Fur Sets at $ 1 0.00 

To cope with a popular demand for a medium priced 
we have made special efforts to secure these 



worth 
in 



Beautiful Fur Sets we are offeririg at $10.00 The 
skins are all perfect; lining of the best; in 
fact, you are getting your money's 
twice over. You can have these sets 
black and imitation Lynx (Long Hair Coney), Rug 
Muff and large shawl, or fancy striped brown mam 
moth sets with animal head 
trimming arid others, per 

set at 

Oppo«:ain. Sets at 

Brown or black satin lined 
lull sized Mtff, long throws, 

per set, at 

Brown and Black Coney Sets, with 
either scarf-like neck piece or 
collarette shape, per set, at 



Our $12.50 Coats 

None such values anywhere. 



$ 1 0.00 



$6.75 



$ 1 2.50 



$6.r5 
$4.98 



$2.98 



Extraordinary Bargain— 
$5.00 Sets for $2.98 

•We have secured fifty Black and Brown Coney Fur 
Sets, full size muff and long throws, suitable for la- 
dies' and misses; fully worth $5.00 set, at a special 
figure. They're on sale at the ape- 
cial low price of, per 

set 

Blue AVolf Riif? Muff Sets $19.30 

Jap Mink Sets, up from $15.00 

Blended Squirrel Sets at $12.50 

Fox Sets, black or brown, up from $15.00 

Coney Muffs at. JJJ^ 

Coney Searfs at Z'. 

Children's Vht Sets at 

(And upwards to $4.95.) 



We have them 
in heavy Black Beaver, or half satin lined 
Broadcloths, and also gray wool mannish 
cloths, all beautifully tailored and cut in 
the latest fashion — 
price 

I' American Broadcloth Coats, finely made, 
fully lined with guaranteed ^ V £\ C^ 
satin, in black and navy, at. . ^ 1 ^ m^KJ 

A great assortment of other Coats, at ^27.50, 
925.00, $22.50 and - - 

down to 

Fur collared, quilted lined 
Black Kersey Coats, at 



,$1.48 



Women's Flannelette 
Gowns 59c 

59c 
75c 



Pink and Blue Striped Flannelette Night 

Gowns, full sizes and lengths at 

Better quality material and fancy trimmed 

gowns at • • •••■••; „ 

Plain blue and white good quality Flannelette Gowns, 
also fancy striped in pink and blue, all sizes, Qflo 
including 18, 19 and 20; extensive selection. . . v\j^ 



Flannelette Petticoats 



MiiliSU-l 



i Trimmed Hats 

From the country's best work shops. If your hat 
is to cost you $25.00 or so, all well and good — the 
milliner will surely please you at that price, but 
should you happen to want a hat that should cost, 
say, about $6.00, then its time you come here 
— for there is no place in this city where you can 
get such striking good values and where your 
particular taste can be suited. 

Ready Trinnne<l Hats — No trimmings — no 
shapes— we specialize you know, and that's your 
benefit. 

Hats ready to wear, trimmecl. .$3.98 to $10.00 
Street Huts 3125 to $3.50 

New Waists Are Here 
—98c up 

Fancy Striped Tailored Waists in light QO^ 
or dark shades and plain white at 70i^ 



In various styles at 79e, 69c, 59e, 50c 

and ........ • • • : • • 

Children's Flannelette Night Robes, with 
feet, sizes 2 to 6, at 



39c 
29c 



$ 1 0.00 
$ 1 2.50 

Suits Worth $22.50 
at $15.00 

You should see them — you would hardly be- 
lieve they cost that little if the price wasn't in 
plain view on the tag. A finely woven worst- 
ed material in beautiful shades of navy, cataw- 
ba, black and green, guaranteed satin lined, 
new pleated skirts — price tf 1 ^ rtrt 

Suits for w^omcn or misses in almost any de- 
siiable shade or style— tf 1 O ^t\ 

^35.00 down to ^> \ 4Sr*^\J 

We Do Not Charge for Alterations. 



■»! 



Voile Skirts $5.95 

$5.95 
$6.50 

cloths and 

$3.50 
Tailored Waists 



All the new styles, embroidery trim- 
ming, semi-pleated, Panama or \oile. 

Fine Woven Panama Cloth Skirts, 
in fashion's latest cut, at 

Specially priced Skirts .in various 
styles at .$10.00, $8.50, $7.50. $6.50, 
$5.95 and down to 



Pure white linen fniished waists in material suitable 
for fall use; an extensive selection fl» | ^ CT 

of styles at 'P I •tSf-^ 

Black Mercerized Cotton Waists in 
neat tailored style at • 

Colored Poplin Waists in fancy high 

shades at ' 

Black Tateta Waists, jet button 

trimmed at 

Heavy Ble.ck Taffeta Waists, open 
front or back; special at 



$ 1 .25 
$1.48 
$2.50 
$3.50 




New Arrivals in Long 

Sweater Coats 



Pure Wool Yarn 3 6 -inch Sweater Coats 

in cardinal at 

Sliver Gray Long Sweater Coats with slightly 
collars; the very new article 

at 

Gray and Cardinal 4 2 -inch Sweater Coats 

Medium length Sweater Coats for women; pure wool 
yarn only, white gray and other colors. 

at $3.50, $2.98 and 

Girls' Sweater Coats, white and cardinal, suitablef*^ 
young ladies 15 to 18; exceptional values 
at - 



$5.50 

jrhtlv rolleil 

$6.00 
$8.50 

; pure wool 

$2.50 

suitable for 

$ 1 .98 






r 



Men*s Wear 



Bargain.^ upon barRains in >fen's Wear at this 
closing out .sale of Gentlemen's A\'earables. 
Men's Wool $1.00 Natural Gray Under- 59C 

wear at • • • 

Men's Fleece Lined Underwear, natural 39C 

gray, extra heavy, at l' •■■ ' ' '^^f 

Men's "Lvon Brand" Dress Shirts, $1.00 kQC 

and $1.25 quality at w^ 

Men's $5.00 Near Seal Fur Caps 

at 

Men's Winter Caps, values 50c, 

Mens Sweater Coats, worth $2.50, 

at 

Boys' Sweater Coats 

at 

Eoys' Long Pants, worth up to $2.00 at U»e 

S^THE NEW SHOES ARE HERE I 



$2.98 
19c 

$1.50 
69c 






e 



Big Values 

New Style Slant 



Cut uppers like il- 
lustration. Also all 
the new lasts for 
women are here, 
and ready at our 
ever-moderate prices 
■ — Women's G o o d- 
year Welt Shoes, in 
all leathers. Kris 
& Pass Co.'s special 



In Our Shoe Department 

Rubbers 



Girls' tan and black calf shoes — 
natural lasts; also the patent 
leather Goodyear welt. They cost 
$4.00 in the regular shoe stores — 
sizes I'^k to 6. Take advantage 
of our buying power, 
and pay only 

Patent colt, women's cloth top 
shoes, button, $2.50 
values at 



$2.50 

:loth top 

$1.98 




Kris & Pass Co.'s $3.00 Special — 

Patent, button, black, navy and gray 
cloth tops, new slant cut, none nicer 
at even $5.00. Special CJ QQ 
value at ^ 



Bemalda line fine quality vici, me- 
dium or low heel shoes, lace or but- 
ton— $2.00 to $2.50 (g| CA 
values at $1.75 and tpi«v/V 

Gun metal calf shoes, 
new shapes, button or 
lace, at 

Boys' shoes in sizes 12 
to 2, at 

Boys' Shoes in sizes 10 
to 12, at 

Girls' Shoes, all sizes — 
per pair 



in all the 

$2.50 
$1.25 
...98c 
..98c 



Extra 
Special! 

50c Baby Shoes at 25c 

See them on the bargain table — 
medium, soft coles, black patent 
tops, in all colors of kid, such 
as light blue, pink, red, white, 
etc., sizes 1 to 4. button or lace. 
Get them at half price, only .^ 



Children's Shoes, on the bargain 
table, sizes 2% to 6 — (small chil 
dren) — $1.00 value.s-j 
per pair ■ 



59c 



^^ 



25c 



To Fit Every- 
body! 

59c 
48c 
39c 



Women's Felt Juliets — 
$1.48, $1.25 and 

Women's House Slippers — 
per pair 

Men's Shoes, regularly 
selling at $2.50— now , 



98c 

25c 

$1.69 



Men's Storm Rubbers — 
per pair 

Women's Storm Rubbers 
— per pair 

Children's Storm Rubbers 

— 43c and 

Boys' Leather top lumbermen's 

rubbers — special 

per pair 

Men's 10-inch top, lum- 
berman's rubbers 

\ Men's rolled edge rubbers, heavy 
lumberman's rubbers, ^^ ^C 

; 6-inch top 9£f£f^ 

i Men's 6-inch extra heavy lum 
' berman' overs, 8-inch 
{top 



$1.25 
$1.98 



$1.98 



Come Here Tomorrow 
for Your Shoes 



New Bags 

98c to $2.50 



J 




SPECIAL VALVE — Black Pa- 
tent Leather Shopping Bags, 
large size, brass lock, inside 
purse; bargain price 
at 



98c 



Black Leather Shopping Bags, 
German silver frames, broken 
bottom or ordinary shaped, at 
only $2.50, $1.75 
and 



$ 1 .50 



Large size Patent Leather Shop- 
ping Bags, leather lined and 
broken bottoms, 
at 



$1.50 



All Leather Shopping Bags, 
leather lined at $1.25 and up. 



I 




Series of Lectures or the 

Law of Commercial 

Paper. 

A. G. McKnIght opened the series of 
lectures on the law of banking and 
commercial paper to be given before 
the Head of the Lakes chapter of the 
.American Institute of Banking, at a 
meeting last night in the First Na- 
tional Bank building. G. W. C. Ross 
of the firm of Itoss & McKniglit is to 
be the regular instructor, but Mr. Mc- 
Knight spoke in his absence last night. 



There were about thirty bank clerks 

^Tt^"the completion of the series of 
lectures an examination will be held, 
and the papers will be passed upon by 
a committee in New York. In addi- 
tion to certificates to be awarded to 
those successfully passing the exam- 
ination, W. I. Prince, cashier of the 
Citv National bank, wiil award cash 
prkes of $25, $15 and $10 to the three 
standing highest in the e-:^aminations. 

E. C. Finney, paying teller ot the 
Northwestern National Bank of Minne- 
apolis, was a guest of the chapter last 
nisht. At the conclusion of the meet- 
ing he was a guest of the executive 
officers of the chapter at the Commer- 
cial club rooms. 

■ 

Don't complain about the cost of 
living. Barthe-Martin sell groceries 
at wholesale. 

■ ■ 

Cold Daniaged Polatoen. 

Moorhead, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — 'Information has been 
received by potato men in this city 
that the present cold spell has done 
considerable damage to potatoe?. That 
portion of the crop that is still in the 
ground is believed to be uninjured, but 



on account of the drop in prices large 
stocks of potatoes were piled up on the 
ground. While these piles were pro- 
tected as much as possible, yet on the 
north side the potatoes were frozen. It 
is hoped that the loss wJLi not be ex- 
tensive. 



HOG INDUSTRY 
GROWING ONE 

New Departure By the North 
Dakota Farmers Is Proving 

Winner^'. > 

icultural College, K.D4 Oc 
lopT industry ' is Dfcomln 



Oct. 15. 



A.gricult 
The liopT industry ' is ' bfcoming one 
of Importance in many parts of North 
Dakota. One thing that has retarded 



it was the lack of corn for fattening 
purposes, and the common idea that 
without corn you cannot profitably 
raise hogs. 

In order to find out the facts In the 
case Dean Sheppard, director of the 
North Dakota experiment station, 
and B. W. Richards, professor of ani- 
mal industry, recently carried out 
some feeding trials, using corn, bar- 
ley and rejected wheat for purposes 
of comparison. 

The r..-sults of the corn-barley trials 
are sum.ned up In the following state- 
ment: "There Is not a wide dif- 
ference between the results we may 
expect from 100 pounds of barley when 
compared with corn for fastening hogs. 
The difference in the quality of pork 
produced, in favor of barley, as will 
be shown later in this bulletin, should 
compensate sufficiently to . make it 
approximate the value of corn." 

Under the market prices $4.50 per 
cwt. the barley fed brought 3C cents 
per bushel, and the corn 51 cents. In 
adoitlon to this the fertilizer value of 
the manure was retained on the farm, 
making the price for each fully fair. 

The rejected wheat trials show 
slightly to the advantage of wheat 



as compared to barley, and a little 
let-s feeding value than corn, busliel 
lor bushel. In the trial the market 
value of the hogs being $5.75 per 
cwt., the wheat returned 66 cents per 
bushel without allowing for value of 
the manure. The lot fed rejected wheal 
did not carry as great a depth of 
tlesh as did the corn fed lot, but the 
conclusion reached regarding the 
quality of the carcass is that "the 
quality of pork produced is even better 
than that produced by corn." 



RECKLESS HUNTER 

NEARLY KILLS MAN. 



a heavy loss of blood before 
assistance could reach him. 



surgical 



Hancock, Mich., Oct. 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — A stray bullet com.ing 
from the direction of the City Driving 
park struck Aleck Gillette on the 
cheek while he was working at the 
Anthony farm Wednesday morning, and 
plowed a deep gash three inches in 
length. Fortunatelv the shot struck 
at such an angle that it did not strike 
inward. Otherwise the injury might 
have proven a dangerous, if not a fatal 
one. As It was Mr. Gillette ssutalned 



RELATIVES NOT WORRYLNG. 

Not Concerned About Report of 
White Being Lost in North. 

Brainerd, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— -W. C. White of Deer- 
wood, who was In the city today, 
states that Cuyler Adams and family 
are not worrying in the least about 
their son. who is In the North with 
Prof. C. K. Leith. The paily was not 
expected to reach civilization until 
late in October. Mr. and Mr.<5. Adams 
and Mr. and Mrs. Culver ,\dams are at 
Gordon. Wis., enjoying a hunting trip, 
which they hardly would be doing did 
the former believe their son was lost. 

Siihot for a Rabbit. 

Two Rivers, Wis., Oct. 15. — Mistaken 
for a rabbit by a companion when 
hunting north of here. Harry Herrlnfir. 
a saloon keeper of this city, was shot 
in the eye by the discharge of the gua 
in his companion's hand. 



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Harry Mitchell's Editorial 




PLACE 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909 




ORDER TOMORROW 



I'm Caught With the Goods 



I'm overstocked on my finer suitings and overcoatings and 
it gave me a headache when I discovered it — because I found 
that even with my usual big monthly increase in orders I've 
got 25 per cent more goods — costly special patterns and fine 
imported pieces — than I can possibly sell this season at any- 
thing like the price they should bring. 

The worst of it is, goods like these made up into suits and 
overcoats ought to bring $35. $40 and $45— other tailors get 
these prices — though I've always been satisfied with $10 to $15 
less — and to cut below my regular price means a net loss — but 
I've figured myself out of the hole — I'm going to slash regular 
prices, stand the loss, charge it to advertising, and, beginning 
tomorrow I'm going to put a lot of new orders on my books by 
offering MY VERY FINEST SUITS OR OVERCOATS 
MADE TO ORDER AT $20 — over 500 patterns to select from. 
I'm just selfish enough to hope that my regular customers 
ion't see this "ad" — I'll get their business anyway — and I'm a 
big loser if I can't create a couple of hundred new customers 
during this sale. Yours truly, 

HARRY MITCHELL, 
New Location : 123 West Superior Street. 



The Adjoining Editorial Tells Why— Read It ! 

This sale is aimed at the'^man who never gave us an order before. The man who has 
been satisfied with hand-me-down clothes, or the man who has paid the high prices 
other tailors charge, I don't care which, and I don't care how well satisfied you are, 
I can satisfy you better and save you money during this sale. You may have your 
choice of my best fabrics, 



•> « * r^. 






MADE TO ORDER 



'/vf 






350 PATTERNS 
IN NEW SUITINGS 

TO SELECT FROM. 

Including finest Worsteds, 
Cassimeres, Cheviots,Serges 
and Tweeds. Also many 
choice English and Scotch 
"Specials' *SUIT TO ORDER 





MADE TO ORDER 



150 PATTERNS 
IN OVERCOATINGS 

TO SELECT FROM. 

Finest Medium and heavy A 
weight materials, in all the Q 
various new weaves and 
shades and the staple fabrics. 
OVERCOAT TO ORDER 




^PFf^IAf MflTII^F* These ^oods are most all in Single Suit and Overcoat leng^ths. They arc beauties, every one of 
^* l-i^l^l-i i^VFllV/JLj* them, and worth $35, $40 and $45 of any man's money, and my gfuarantce of positive satisfaction 
g^oes with every order tomorrow, and all next week at $20 for Suit or Overcoat. 



TOMORROW 

AND 

ALL NEXT WEEK 




15^ ^V^ l^^^'T^ 




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GRAND JURY 
IS ATTACKED 

Attorney for Indicted Man 

Alleges Misconduct on 

Jury's Part 

County Attorney Admits Pro- 
ceedings Were Not En- 
tirely Regular. 



Bemi.lji. Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.! — In moving for an order 
from Judge Wright setting aside the 
indictments returned against M. G. Slo- 
cum of this city. John F. Gibbons, at- 
tornejr for Slocum. made some sensa- 
tional statements as to the alleged 
animus back ot the circumstances lead- 
ing up to the indictments and the man- 
ner in V. hicii tlie late grand jury con- 
ducted tlie investigations prior to the 
returning of the three Indictments, one 
of whicli was for wrongfully imperson- 
ating an officer; the second for falsely 
presenting a claim and the third for 
larceny. 

Mr. Gibbons stated that l»e would 
ask the court to set aside tlie indict- 
ments beca-use of gross misconduct on 
the part of the grand jury in making 
their deliberations concerning said in- 
dictment public before said indict- 
ment was found; in maliciously con- 
spiring with eacli other and with other 
persons to indict defendant before any 
evidence was adduced before said 
grand jury against the defendant; in 
totally ignoring and disregarding the 
cliarge of this court and the law rela- 
tive to ilie conduct of grand juries; in 
permitting a person to be present at 
tlie session of the grand jury wliile the 
cliarge embraced in tlie indictment was 
under consideration; in admitting a 
person otiier than a witness into tlie 
grand jury room while said grand jury 
was In session and divulging to him 
tlieir deliberations with reference to 
finding Indictments against this defend- 
ant: In permitting and allowing a per- 
son not a member of the grand jury 
or the county attorney or the attorney 
general tf> be present during tlie exam- 
ination of witnesses upon whose testi- 
mony this Indictment was found. 

ilr. Gibbons claimed that H. J. Loud 
of tliis city, a private citizen and in 
no manner Connected with the offices of 
county attorney or attorney general, 
and who was not in any other way 
lawfully entitled to know what was go- 
ing on in the grand jury room, was 
admitted to the deliberations of the 
Jury; that Loud drew the indictments, 
and otlierwise misbeliaved. 

In substantiation of the claim made 
In the motion for the order. Mr. Gibbons 
submitted several affidavits, tending to 
show tiiat the transactions of the jury 
w^ere a matter of common knowledge at 
all times. 

Coiinly Attorney McKusick statei 
that he liad been excluded from the 
jury room while th«r jury was consid- 



ering the Slocum matter, and lie agreed 
with the attorney for Mr. Slocum that 
the indictments should be set aside; 
tlvat he would refuse to prosecute these 
cases unless specifically ordered so to 
do by the court: that he believed that 
the returning of the indictments were 
but the results of political Intrigue and 
he would have nothing to do witli 
them. 

Judge Wright said he would care- 
full.v consider the matter and would 
render a written decision later. 

RED TAPE DOES 
NOT HALT THEM 

Lankin, N. D. Business Men 

Pitch Right in and Fix 

Road. 

Lankm, X. D., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Lankin business men, 
when they find one of the highways 
leading to the city out of order, do not 
wait around tor the township board of 
supervisors to get busy and make im- 
provements, but instead do the work 
themselves. There has been one par- 
ticularly bad place near the city for 
some time pa.st and the result was that 
on Tuesday a party of twenty busi- 
ness men of the town, with pick and 
shovel, journeyed to the place and 
fixed things up. 

Tlieir work included the removal of 
about 1,000 boulders and stones and the 
leveling of a small liill to a grade 
equal with that of the road. This 
policy of nvaking good roads is one 
that the Lankin business men propose 
to maintain, as they find tliat it has 
paid them well already. 



read by Dr. Frank C. Todd and Dr. J. 
C Litzeberg of Minneapolis, and by 
James J. Dow, .superintendent of the 
state school for the blind at Faribault. 

That from 20 to 30 per cent of the 
cases of blindness in Minnesota occur 
at birtl.. and could have been prevent- 
ed by proper medical treatment, is the 
assertion of physicians who discussed 
the question. Even members of the 
association \v-ere surprised by the re- 
m.arkal le tables of figures presented 
by the men wlio are particularly in- 
terested in tlie blind. 

Dr. AV. W. Mayo of Roclicster. dean 
of Minnesota physicians, father of the 
famous Mayo brothers, was in attend- 
ance at the meeting. Dr. Mayo was 
welcomed by 200 physicians. Although 
he Is 94 years old, he is active men- 
tally and physically, and he took a 
great interest In the deliberations of 
the association 



hn£.- 



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New Location, 123 West Superior Street. 



TOMORROW 

AND 

ALL NEXT WEEK 





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nesota and North Dakota, and has long 
been noted for its^ palatial thirst em- 
poriura^** The unp&id tax runs Into 
the thousands of dollars-. 



TO SELECT DESIGNS. 



MEDICAL MEN 



END MEETING 



Minneapolis Gets Next Con- 
vention and Dr. Jones 
Is President 

Winona. Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The annual session of 
the State Medical association here 
came to a close yesterday. Minneapo- 
lis was chosen as the next meeting 
place, Oct. 6 and 7. 1910, and the fol- 
lowing officers elected: Presideni. Dr. 
W. A. Jones, first vice president. Dr. 
\\. F. Dimltt. Red Wing: secv>nd vice 
president. Dr. Hugh P. McGaughey, 
Winona, and third vice president, Dr. 
G. W. Bray. New Ulm. 

Memorial resolutions in honor of 
Governor Jolinson were adopted by the 
association. 

Dr. Burnside Foster of St. Paul ad- 
\ocat"d the sterilization of habitual 
criminals and degenerates. He recom- 
mended that the association use ever)- 
effort to obtain the passage of a stat- 
ute authorizing it in state institutions. 

As a part of the campaign for the 
education of the nubile in matters of 
public health, the association will wage 
a determined war against unnecessary 
blindneas. Papers on the subject were 



iMeeting to Be Held in Fargo to 
Choo.se Ship Silver Service. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Oct. 13. — (.Special 
to The Herald.) — The next meeting of 
the North Dakota silver service com- 
mittee will be held in Fargo on Oct. 26 

or 27. at which time the designs for 
the service to be presented the battle- 
ship North Dakota will be considered. 
A prize of |50 has been offered for the 
best design and it would seem that the 
committee will have a long string of 
designs to select from. 

The movement towards the collec- 
tion of funds for the service is general 
over the entire state. A ready re- 
sponse has been met with everywhere 
and there will be very few counties that 
will fail in raising the amount they 
have been called upon for. Under the 
state constitution, the money for the 
purchase of the service could not be 
appropriated from the state funds. 

TAWXEY'S APPEAL ARGUED. 



*^ MARKET DAY BENEFITS. 

Very Apparent in North Dakota 
Towns Having Them. 

Grand Forks. N. D., Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Market days 
are becoming valuable e.s.sets for many 
of the smaller cities of North Dakota, 
wher.» they are being held with ii.- 
creasing regfularity Almast every small 
town in the 'state tiiat is of any im- 
poitance has held a market day at 
some time or other daring the past 
year, and the results everywhere have 
been very good. 

That the holding of narket days are 
the means of bringing about a greater 
interest aia^i^g fanners in tlie raising 
of prize sampl«.s of vegetables and 
grains is the belief of those who have 
had e.Kperlence in the work Thty con- 
tend that th^ farmers, by being pro- 
vided with an 'op in market for theiv 
produce, have taken more pride in tiie 
raising of vegetables. The competi- 
tions that ard held on market days 
have biought about livalry among 
faimers, and the results are of the 
most beneficial kind. 

During the fall and winter it Is ex- 
pected that more of these events will 
be held than ev»r bffoie. 

FARMERS KILL A BEAR. 



Fii*st District Congressman Asks 
Supreme Court for New Trial. 

St. Paul. Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Argument In the llb?l 
suit of Congressman James A. Tawney 
of Winona against the Albert Lea Trib- 
une, was heard in supreme court yes- 
terday. Mr. Tawney seeks to recover 
$10,000 damages for a publication in 
the Tribune reflecting on his official 
record. 

Mr. '^awney was present at the hear- 
ing, which was granted him on appeal 
from the lower court, where he lost the 
suit. Mr. Tawney took no part in the 
argument. His case was conducted by 
Dunn & Carlson of Albert Lea. Tliomas 
Meighen. Jr., of the same city, repre- 
sented the Tribune. 

The publication complained of was 
a reprinted article from the Philadel- 
phia North American, with comment 
by the Tribune. Mr. Tawney alleged 
that the article garbled a speech made 
bv lilm in defense of the appropriation 
bill on the floor of the house. The 
lower court said the article was privi- 
leged. 

EAST GRAND FORKS " 

OWES STATE MICH. 



St. Paul. Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — It has just been discov- 
ered that tlie city of Bast Grand Forks, 
the principal industry of which is 
catering to the thirsty of North Da- 
kota, has never complied with the law 
requiring the payment of 2 per cent of 
all saloon licenses to the account of 
the state inebriate asylum. 

East Grand Forks at one time had 
nearly thirty saloons, and it is said 
that the number is even greater now. 
It is located on the line between Mln- 



Briiin Was Crushing Dog When 
Fatal Shot Wa.s Fired. 

Eau ClJilre. Wis.. Oct. -5. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — William Albrecht and 

Fred Tumm, two farmers residing in 
the town of Ludington, brought here a 
black bear which the latter killed 
Wednesday morning in the town of 
Ludington, about six miles northeast of 
Fall creek. 

Mr. Tumm noticed the bear tracks in 
the snow about S o'clock and hastened 
to Mr. Albrecht's house and told him 
about it. Procuring their rifles- the 
two set out after the bear. taking 
along with them two dogs, a shep- 
lierd and a hound. Afner three hours 
of hard trailing, they came upon the 
bear. Mr. Thumm raisin? a rifle and 
sending a bullet into the bruin's body. 
The bullet struck no vital spot so the 
bear was not killed. 

Tlie shepherd dog then attacked the 
bear and a lively fight ensued. The 
dog was holding Its own, but the bear 
had its ffbnt paws around the dog and 
was slowly crushing it. Mr. Tumm 
seeing the dog's peril sent another 
bullet through the bear's brains, ending 
its life. 

GRAND FORKS POSTMVSTER 
CONTEvST STILL UNSETTLED. 



Grand Forks. N. D.. Oct. 15.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The local post- 
mastership question, ■« hich for some 
time past has been far from settled, 
does not seem to have experienced 
any great improvement as a result of 
a conference -of local politicians held 
Tuesdav evening. At this conference, 
which took place in the law offices of 
Attorney- B. O. Skulason, A. I. Hunter, 
rresident . of the Nortl. Dakota State 
Fair association, received the indorse- 
ment for the position, after F. V. Kent 
and Mr. Hunter had received a tie vote. 
The fact thtt only ten votes were cast 
at the conference resulted in consid- 
erable discussion of 'he proposition 
after it became noised about the citv. 

The term of Mrs. William Budge as 
postmistress expires on Dec. 4, and as 
the Budge family are removing for 
Oregon, will not be in the race for the 
position akain. The office pays $r..600 
u year, and is one of the fattest politi- 
cal plums of the season. 

STILLWATER MANDEAD. 

Stillwater. Minn.. Oct. 15. — (S^iecial to 
The Herald.) — William Casey, son of 



the late Mr. and Mrs. Tliomas Casey, 
died yesterday morning at Minneapolis 
at the age of 31 years. Mr. Casey was 
born and reared in Stillwater, and 
lived here until the past year, when 
he went to Minneapolis. Mr. Casey 
leaves a wife and two children. The 
body arrived in this city at 4 o'clock 
yesterday and was taken to the resi- 
dence of his sister, Mrs. Edward 
Elliott, 1226 South First street. 

Tlie funeral will he held from St. 
Michael's church tomorrow morning at 
9:3{». 



South Dakota Paper Sold. 

Mitchell. S. D., Oct. 15. — The an- 
nouncenient is made of the sale of the 
Mitclieil Daily Republican to W. R. 
Ronald, editor of the Sioux Falls 
Press, the transfer being made by A. E. 
Dean, business manager of the Repub- 
lican for twenty-six >'ears. 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



whose iiome is at Cherry vale, Kan.. 
droi)pod dead in the general store of T. 
T, Lund, in this village, Monday after- 
noon. He was for many years a resi- 
dent of this city, but removed to Kan- 
sas several years ago. 




Moorhead — A big job is in progress 
at Muskoda, a small station near Haw- 
ley on the Northern Pacific, the moving 
of a great elevator structure from the 
site near the old station, to a point 
near the new one, and over a very 
rough and rather hilly road. 

East Grand Forks — The will of the 
late James E. Sullivan has been filed lor 
probate. Judge T. A. Sullivan and 
Michael McGuire being executors of 
the estate valued at $75,000. 

Stillwater — Teachers in the rural dis- 
tricts have been reporting to the coun- 
ty superintendent the names of parents 
who have children of school age who 
have not been attending school in ac- 
cordance with the compulsory law. The 
lists have been handed to County At- 
torney Nethaway for legal proceed- 
ings. 

Cambridge — Mr. and Mrs. Otto Ander- 
son left Thursday for tiieir home in 
St>okane, Wasli., after a four months' 
visit with old friends and relatives in 
Cambridge and vicinity. 

Isanti — Mrs. Peter Peterson. Frances 
and Ralph Peterson, went to Duluth on 
Monday, where Mrs. Peterson was sum- 
moned by the serious illness of Mrs. E. 
Duclos of Wrenshall, who was for- 
merly well known here as Miss Julia 
Hanson of Cambridge. 

Perham — The anniversary of the ded- 
ication of St. Henry's church, will be 
celebrated next Sunday. The Christian 
Mothers' societ.v of the church will 
serve dinner and supper. 

North Branch — A number of the 
young people of North Branch have 
organized a string orchestra under 
the leadership of Prof. August Sko- 
mars. At i)resent there are ten mem- 
bers with several others in prospect. 
This is a good thing and sliould be 
encouraged. 

Owatonna — The regular semi-annual 
meeting of the presbytery of Winona, 
including all the churches in South- 
eastern Minnesota, was held in the 
Presbyterian church lieie for two days, 
closing Wednesday night, Tlie meet- 
ing was opened by a sermon by the 
Rev. I'. C. Bayley of Houston. The 
Rev. E. S'. Carey of Hayfield was 
elected moderator and the Rev. George 
Donahue temporary clerk. 

St. Cloud — A. G. Whitney has de- 
cided to go out of the horse business 
and on the 21st of October is going to 
sell at auction all of his fine driving 
and running horses. The auction is to 
be held at Grey Crest farm, three miles 
west of this city. 

Crookston — Will Kelly was brought 
before Judge Gossman of the muni- 
cipal court Wednesday, charged with 
having passed a forged check on Mer- 
chant Reeper of Nielsville. The state 
liad four witnesses and the defendant 
had thiee, w'ho proved to the satisfac- 
tion of the court that he was in Crook- 
ston at the time the crime was alleged 
to liave been committed. 

Moorhead — Deputy Revenue Inspector 
Guy A. Aubal of Crookston was engaged 
at tlie courthouse Wednesday listing 
the corporations of Clay county. He is 
performing this labor in the interest 
of the enforcement of the new federal 
excise tax or cori>oration tax. 

Fayuesville — Michael P. Beckley, 



Negaunee — The 8-year-old son of 
Victor Barkkuner residing on Maas 
street, died Tuesday night from brain 
trouble. The funeral was held Thurs- 
day at 10 o'clock. 

Munising — Miss Ruth Wentzel has 
left Munsing for Chicago to enter the 
Baptist Mission Training school with 
the intention of preparing herself for 
missionary work. The course is three 
vears. 

Ishpemlng — State Librarian Bailey 
has arrived in the city to attend the 
meeting of the Upper Peninsula Teach- 
ers' association. He has an exhibit of 
library books and pictures in the 
biological laboratory at the high 
school. 

Houghton — Charles F. Townsend of 
Jackson, representative in congress and 
co-sponser for the Townsend-PJsch rail- 
road bill, is coming to Houghton. He 
will arrive Oct. 19 and remain until 
Oct. 21, when he leaves for Ironwood. 
He writes that he is coming for the 
purpo.^e of meeting the leading citi- 
zens of the Copper country. 

Calumet — The funeral of Mrs. Fred 
Dyer was held Wednesday' afternoon 
with services at the Calumet M. E. 
church, Rev. K. Scdweek officiating. 
Interment was in Lake View cemetery. 

Hancock — Copper country lodges of 
the Knights of Kaleva are arranging 
to attend a big meeting in Hancock 
on Nov. 7. the anniversary of the Sot- 
kan lodge of Hancock. A program of 
music and addresses will be prepared 
and prominent Finnish residents of the 
county will be among the speakers. 

Hancock — Frank Drapeau. for a 
number of j-ears a resident of Chas- 
sell, is dead, aged 81 .years. The de- 
ceased had been ill for a lengthy period 
and his demise wa.s not entirely unex- 
pected. He is survived by his wife and 
large family. 

Ironwood— The Ironwood Gas com- 
pany, which will serve both this city 
and Hurley, Wis., has started the con- 
struction of its plant. Providing the 
labor can be procured, a force of up- 
wards of 150 men will be employed. 
Some ten miles of mains will be in- 
stalled. The plant will have a capacity 
of 100,000 cubic feet daily. 

Houghton — The Sparrow-Kroll Lum- 
ber company's mill at Kenton, in the 
southern end of Houghton county, will 
cease cutting operations on V/ednes- 
day of next week, after a most suc- 
cessful season. Since commencing 
operations early in the year the mill 
has been operated quite steadily and 
when the plant closes it will have cut 
upwards of 15.000,000 feet. 

Calumet — J. F. Jacobson. leader of 
the Finnish Humu band, was the first 
to make application for a deer license 
in Calumet. He was closely followed 
by John Stolt. Isaac Raubala and J. J. 
Heikmann. 

Laurium — A movement is well under 
way among the Pytliians of the Cop- 
per country to bring about the organ- 
ization of a temple of the Dramatic 
Order of the Knights of Khorassan In 
Laurium. The initial steps towards 
the organization have been taken by 
the "Dokays." as the members of this 
order are familiarly known. 




Fargo. N. D. — At the annual business 

meeting of the Fargo Y. M. C. A. Sun- 
day the following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: President. W. C. 
Macfadden; vice president, J. H. Worst: 
secretary, W. J. Lane; treasurer, H. L. 
Loomis; auditor, H. P. Lough. 

Valley City, N. D. — Postoffice inspec- 
tors, who have been in the city looking 
over conditions, warned Mayor Cowell 
and Postmaster Pray that unless more 
sidewalks were built in Valley City, 
the free delivery of mail would be sus- 
pended. 

Minot, N. D. — The regular Minot term 



of the United States court convened 
here Tuesday. The first case to be 
called on the civil calendar i.s that of 
Nyhus against th.e city of Minot and I>. 
A. Dinnie. In thi.s action the plaintiff 
suffered injuries by a fall in the exca- 
vation which was dug for the new 
Optic building. 

Fargo, N. D. — Another chapter in the 
suit of Attorney A. C. Lacy against the 
Northwestern Interurban Railway com- 
pany was added Wedne-sday in the dis- 
trict court when a motion for new 
trial was argued by the plaintiff and 
Attorney A. W. Cupler, representing 
certain stockholders of the concern. 

Jamestown, N. D. — The Courtenay 
flour mill has been sold to W. F. Mof- 
fett who comes from the West. 

Bismat-ck, N. D. — The granite stones 
for the front of the new Merchants 
bank building have arrived and are 
placed in position. They are very 

handsome, having a fine polished sur- 
face. It has been no small job to get 
them placed in position. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — John Riley died 
Tuesday evening at 10:30 o'clock at the 
home of Mrs. James Coyle 1118 Dakota 
avenue. He had been 111 the last nine 
weeks. Mr. Riley was 71 years of age. 

Mott. N. D. — The local Masons met at 
Auditor Beerv's office and perfected a 
Blue lodge organization and discussed 
other matters pertaining to the perma- 
nency thereof. The attendance was 
quite encouraging and the order will 
soon be on its feet in good shape. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — The removal of 
poles on De Mers avenue and Tliird 
street is occupying the attention of 
the Grand Forks Gas & Electric com- 
pany at present. The appearance of 
these two streets will be greatly Im- 
proved when the work is completed. 



I » 




Ashland — For alleged selling of 
liquor to an Indian lad of 14 years, 
Conrad Emmerling was fined $50 and 
costs in municipal court Wednesday 
on his plea of nolle condere through 
his attorney. Frank B. Lamoreux. The 
case may be appealed. 

Milwaukee — Fires cost Milwaukee 
$810,466.25 during the fiscal year end- 
ing on .'^ept. 30. 1909. according to re- 
ports submitted In the annual meet- 
ing of the Milwaukee Board of Fire 
Underwriters Wednesday. The total 
amount of insurance carried on prop- 
erty affected was $11,330,103.15. 

Waupaca — Not over one-half of the 
crop of potatoes has been dug. ac- 
cording to men posted on conditions 
in this locality. That means there is 
danger of a good share of the crop 
being a loss. If the snow stays on 
the ground and a hard frost does not 
follow the poiatc»es probably will be 
saved. Another crop tliat is not har- 
vested is cal)bage. Only warm weath- 
er can save it now. 

Burlington — Horse thieves stole a 
bay mare, a rubber-tired buggy and 
some harness from the stable of How- 
ard Foreman, two miles north of here. 
They also attempted to take a horse 
from the barn of P. J. Zerlialen, a 
neighbor, but the animal was fuund 
wandering near the barn. 

Waterford — Burglars earl.v Wednes- 
day wrecked the safe of the Waterford 
State bank, but fled without securing 
any booty. The explosion did not 
alarm the village. The burglary was 
discovered when Cashier William San- 
ders opened the bank. 

Madison — The state of Wisconsin 
has $0.766. 11 on deposit with the de- 
funct First National Bank of Mineral 
Point. Bonds in the sum of $52,000. 
sig'ned principally by officers and 
stockholders of the institution, are held 
as security. 

La Crosse — W. W. Cargill, railroad 
owner, irrigation promoter and spec- 
ulator, is in a serious condition at his 
home here. Outside relatives are at 
the bedside and a Minneapolis special- 
ist is attending him. Relatives, how- 
ever, say his condition is not danger- 
ous. 

Ashland — Senator Donald of Madison 
and Assemblyman Chinook of St. Croix 
county, arrived Wednesday evening 
from Rhinelander to attend the meet- 
ing of tiie legislative special committee 
on roads. 



I t 



t^t^ 



\_\-i I I - r i" 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





*.«' I i.wt ,|^i 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1909 



9 



i — i 



BEUEVED THAT ALL 



.^St. 



*>—^ 



ESCAPED WIFH UVES 





:^^^@^^ 






After working since early this morn- 
ing in a strenuous endeavor to locate 
the bodies of two men supposed to 
have been drowned wlien the over- 
loaded rowboat sank in the Northern 
r'aeific slip, members of the Duluth life 
saving crew announced their belief 
that no loss of life resulted through 
the sinking of the boat. 

As soon as the men in the accident 



reached shore they ran for home as 
rapidly as possible to secure dry cloth- 
ing. Two men stated that two of the 
laborers in the crowded boat failed to 
come to the surface. No trace has 
been found of the bodies, if the nien 
were drowned. It is now believed that 
all escaped, and this afternoon the 
police stated that all the men knov/n 
to be in the boat were accounted for. 



WOULD KILL 
PRKIDENTS 

Anarchists' Plot Is Said to 

Have Been Unearthed 

in Chicago. 

Secret Service Men Are De- 
clared to Be Taking Extra 
Precautions. 



Always Send Your Mall Orders to 



Two Big Specials 
Tomorrow 



Vat l.a«eii and In«er- 
tionM in odd patterns 
and deitigns — trimmed 
lines — Special, Ic yard. 



Sliort endM of Brnidfl 
and Appilquejt — odd 
trinimingtt — worth to 
50c or more — Special, 
Ic yard. 




117-110 WEST SUPERIOR ST., DULTJTH, 3IINN.. 
For Quick. Satisfactory Service. 



Remnants of Ribbons 

A sweeping dean -up of all the short lengths and 
< ij remnants of plain and fancy ^ fi^ 

1^1* ribbons that sold as high as i Jl^ 
* *^ ^^ 25c to 50c yard — A great lot 

of pretty ribbons — ^blg snaps at 15c the yardl 




18.50 for Smart $25.00 Broadcfolti Coats 



Chicago. Oct. 15. — The Chicago Jour- 
nal today declares that an anarchist 
plot, directed from Chicago by men 
planning to assassinate I'resident Tafi 
and President Diaz at El Paso. Tex., 
tomorrow, has been discovered by se- 
cret service men here. The Journal 
story proceeds: 

•'Chief Wtlkie of the secret service 
bureau has assigned many detecUyes 
to Chicago to learn llie identity of the 
men selected to kill the two presidents. 

"For the last two weeks, it was 
learned today, meetings have been held 
by anarchist groups in every large city 
of the countrv, but tlie assassination 
plans, according to government agents, 
were completed In this city. 

Secret Service Men at Work. 

■•Four of Chief Wilkies men. dis- 
guised as laborers, attended the t«ocial- 
ist meeting here last night at which 
the execution of Prof. Ferrer was con- 

^*The* Journal declares that secret 
eervlce men have been brought here 
from Denver and other cities to assist 
in the Investigation, and that others 
have been rusiied to El I'aso. It is 
asserted that the cancellation of a pub- 
flc meeting of the heads ot. these two 
governments was at the advice of Chief 
Wilkle. 

DIai at Cludad. . , 4 

El Paso, Tex., Oct. 15.— President 
Diaz of Mexico arrived at Ciudad, 
across the river from El Paso, this 
morning. He will not cross the Rio 
Grande into United States territory 
until tomorrow, when he will meet 
President Taft. _ ,,, , . 

Governor Campbell of Texas, with his 
staff, arrive d here this morni ng. 

DEUTH MAN MAY 
LOSEjnS BRIDE 

Carl Banna's Mother Says 

Son Was Minor When He 

Got Married. 

New York. Oct. 15. — Mrs. Edmund 
K. Stallow, mother of Carl H. Han- 
na, a grandson of the late Sen- 
ator Hanna, will begin proceedings 
to annul the marriage of her son and 
Miss Gertrude Leavltt without delay 
She asserts that her son was not 01 
agl when he married Miss Leavitt. on 
Julv 30 last, and iliat the ceremony 
had been performed without her 

"priends of young Hanna said today 
that he declared that no one would 
ever separate him from his w>fe. Air. 
and Mrs. -Hanna are now in Boston, 
vrslting at the home of Guy S. Leavitt 
a brother of the bride. They expect 
fo retu^-n"^ to the home of Mrs. Marion 
B Phelps, a siser ot the bride, at Pel- 
ham Manor, tonight or tomorrow. 

Next Tuesday the Hannas will go to 
Duluth, Minn., where Mr. Hanna has 
business In terests. 

MINERAL POINT 
BANKER ACCUSED 

Allen, Jr., Arrested for 
AUeged Theft of 
$168,000. 

Milwaukee, Wis, Oct. 15,— A Daily 
News special from Mineral Point, W is., 
savs: , - . , 

Phillip Allen. Jr., vice president of 
the Firfct National Bank of Mineral 
Point, was arrested today, charged 
with the embezzlement of $168,000 of 
the banks funds. , u • 

Allen is at his home ill, and physi- 
cians say he may die. 
■ 
EsKteru t;irl to Help. 

Asbury Park. N. J.. Oct. ir;.--Mlss 
Lulu M. Rawson of this city will help 
In straightening out the affairs of the 
First National Bank of Mineral Point. 
Wis. Miss Rawson, who has been an 
assistant for some time to Alvu- 
Jjowler, the federal bank examiner, 
wno has been settling up the affairs ot 
the First National bank at Manasquan. 
this state, displayed such exceptionrl 
ability with figures that she has been 
engaged by John W. Schofield, receiver 
of the Mineral Point bank, to assist 
him She left here today for Mineral 
Point, accompan ied by her m other. 

SOCfAL UPLIFT IS THEME 

OF THE CHURCHMEN. 

Providence, R. 1.. Oct. l.i.— Addresses 
and general discussion of many sub- 
jects relating to church work and so- 
cial uplift marked the Brotherliood of 
St. Andrew convention here today. 

Among the speakers were several of 
the foremost theologians of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal ch irch and prominent 
laymen. ^_^_^__— 

ORIENTAL GOODS MEN 

ARE MADE BANKRUPTS. 



Thursday, shipped goods worth $10,000 
to the Chicago and Pittsburg branches 
and had previously sold off a large part 
of the local stock for a small fraction 
of the value. ^^___^^ 

DEUTH MAN ON 
NATIONAL BOARD 

Building Managers' Conven- 
tion Recognizes Import- 
ance of This City. 

Duluth has received national atten- 
tion as a growing real estate center 
through the appointment of Whitney 
Wall as a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the National Convention of 
Building Managers. 

Mr. Wall received notice of his ap- 
pointment today. At tlie recent con- 
vention of the building managers, Mr. 
Wall impressed the growtii of Duluth 
so impressively upon the members of 
the convention, that the city has been 
given a voice, through the appoint- 
ment of Mr. Wall, in the affairs of the 
convention. , , ,• 

The members of the board of (di- 
rectors are: D. H. Doyle, Detroit, 
chairman; C. A. Paterson, Chicago, .sec- 
retarv: Jolin C. Knight, New York: C. 
B. llfcketts, St. Louis; Whitney Wall, 
Duluth. 

It is the object of the building man- 
agers, as soon as branches of the as- 
sociation are established in every city, 
to organize a national body At the 
present time the liolding of the con- 
vention is about the only activity of 
the organization. .^ , ». 

When this is accomplished, Duluth 
will be given a voice in the control of 
the organization. 

The appointment of Mr. Wall, not 
only is a recognition of liis work in 
the convention, but is also a recogni- 
tion of the growing importance Du- 
luth is assuming in realty circles. 



CLASSY LONG KILTED MODELS IN BLACK, NAVY, GREEN and RAISIN. 



PRINCE OPENS 
DOVER HARBOR 

Big Naval Work Has Cost 

Great Britain About 

$20,000,000. 

Dover, Eng.. Oct. 15. — The naval 
harbor which has been in course of 
construction here for eleven years, and 
has cost about $20;000,000, was for- 
mally opered today by the prince of 
Wales. The warships in the harbor 
were gaily decorated, and a grand mil- 
itary display was made on shore. The 
harbor comprises an area of nearly 
700 acres formerly covered by the sea, 
but to which the biggest dreadnoughts 
now have access at all tides. 

WILL DEDICATI 
THEIR NEW HOME 



The new Elks home will be dedi- 
cated Friday evening Oct. 29. the ex- 
ercises beginning at 7:30 o'clock. Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand Exalted Ruler Mc- 
Phee of Crookston is expected to be 
present as well as prominent Elks 
from Superior, the iron ranges and the 
Twin Cities. 

Following tne dedicatory exercises 
there will be a social session open 
only to Elks. 




IHIS surely was good buying on our part— and those who 

' are lucky enough to share in this purchase will have reason to be glad that we 
were awake to our opportunities! We'll tell the news bnefly-but that does not 
lessen its importance! 




These coats are of broadcloth of fine 
quality— in beautiful, lustrous black 
and In just the right shades of navy, 
green and raisin. Tlic tailorinj; is 
remarkably good! Tlie garments look 
far beyond their price! 





They are made In the most fash- 
ionable 52- inch length, in a handsome 
aioyenage model, with full kilted 
.skirt — and ai-e lined to waist with 
warranted satin! Your friends will 
ne\er guess the price you paid! 





We Also Offer Two Other Great Lines of Stylish Coats! 
One Line at $ 1 5.00 and Another at $25.00. 

"Best values I have seen this year"— that's what a travel- 

L ing man said yesterday when we showed hina the garments that made ot,r cloak room 
1% such a busy place, yesterday! And he sold coats for another ■lo"^^. °° «^ ^'^°"g'" 
the man who made these coats must have wanted our busmess mighty badl> ! 

"And you can't be making any money 
on tliem in selling such c<»ats at tliose 
nricH-.s" was the traveling nuin s hnal 
(omment: Well, uere not tel!ing 
tliai — but you'll realize just what 
matchless values these are if >"" ve 
looked around at all! Hurry here! 
Get first clioice tomorrow! Its quick 
selling we'll be doing! 

v,-r. . ^ ^ _^ _ ^ SUITS TOMORROW 

v^^ ▼ *^ V SEE^Om ©rTHEM IN THE SHOW WINDOW ! 

It's just another of those "Acquaintance Sales''-One of those occ^^^^^^^ 

regular goods from regular stock-and sell them way below our legitimate profit J" ^^ ^""^^^^ir^.'f.T' ' ^^ ^" 
thf permanent customers we'll win among the many new customers who will be attracted by this sale. 

These six prices ! No approvals ! No Lay-Bys ! No Refunds ! 

$15.00 $18.50 

A Special Lot A Special Lot Re- 

Reduced from $25. duced from $27.50. 

Remember all are new— and highly desirable ! 




4. 



• 



•es! No approvals! i\o i^ay-r^yb: inu ivc...xxv.o. 

$27.50 $32.50 $37.50 $47.50 



A Special Lot 
Reduced from $35. 



A Special Lot 
Reduced from $40 
This is just a special offer of dozens of new lines! 



A Special Lot 
Reduced From $45. 



A Special Lot 
Reduced from $55. 



t. 



Tomorrow Last Day of 

the 69c Sale of 

Dress Goods 

Bargain Square 




This sale has set 
the peop'e a-talking 
as no other dress 
goods sale we've 
held in recent years 
— all are goods from 
regular s.ocks — good 
colors — aid desirable 
weaves such as — 



69c 



Black and colorrd checked Voile*. 4150 and $1.25 Undt. 
$1.00 black and colored silk Crepe Poplins. 
$1 and $1.25 checked wool TalTeta* in black and colors. 
$1.25 Eoliennes— striped Serjes— 50-inch Panamas. 
Empress Cloths— 54-in. Meltons— Striped French Seruet 
Checked Panama— Melanje Sultinus— <ancy Mohairs, etc. 



69c 




And 
place 



OBITUARY 



George D. Fowle, an official of the 
Pennsylvania railroad and one of the 
foremost authorities on golf in this 
countrv died suddenly at Philadelphia, 
Oct. 14,' of heart disease. Mr. Fowle 
was born in Ale.xandria, Va., in 1860. 
His family were closely related to that 
of George Washington. He was a 
brother-in-law of Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. 



They're all rare bargains— materials and colorings such as are 
wanted for house dresses— one-piece gowns— waists-girls' dresses and 

'""^^^ Widths range 42 to 54 inches — values range 89c 
to $1.50 — all at one price at only b9c the >ard. 



Saturday is 
Shoe Day 

our Shoe Dep't is the only 
in town where you can get 
\%'oinen'H Belinar Shoea, 
The best of all shoes sold, at 53.00 
the pair. 

Gray Bros.' »5.00 Shoes for »4.00. 
These well-known fine $5.00 bnoes 
for Women are only $4.00 here. 
Hysienic Shoes for Women. 
Tender feet get instant relief in 
these easy shoes, with sweat-proof 
cushion soles. 

Children's "Censlble" Shoes 
For boys and girls — wide lasts — 
good wearers — $1.25 to $:i.50. 

THESE PKICES ON STORM 
ULBBEKS: 
Women's, 65c pair. 
Misses', 50c pair. 
Children's, 40c pair. 



Again! More Beavers 
Handsome Picture 
Shapes ! 



You Will 
Like Them! 



The best makers in the land are 
sending us a constant stream of 
their newest shapes in Beaver Hats 
— but there's not enough to supply 
all who want them! 

This Is to tell those who are 
waltlns .for .them, that a 
new lot Is ready lor tomor- 
row's sellinBl 
We'll sell them untrimmed at rea- 
sonable prices, or we will trim them 
up in excellent taste at prices rang- 
ing from ten dollars up! We'll take 
pains to suit your face and figure! 

NEW BEAVER Tl RBANS, TOOl 
Yon'Il And new shapes — 
large and Hinall — flue quality 
Beavers — Russian, Co.«isaeli, 
as well as smaller shapes to 
suit those desiriuK trig little 
utility Hats! 

HERE ARE HATS THAT HAVE DECIDED STYLE AND TONE! 

Even inexpensive Hats can be stylish — it is not the price you pay, 
but the skill and talent of the maker that counts In Millinery! 
See the handsome tailored Hats offered ~ 

tomorrow at ».'i.00 to »i::.00 — that's 
proof of its bauty and worth 





$5.00 



Former United States Senator Will- 
iam Lindsay died at his home in 
Frankfort. Ky., Oct. 15. Senator Lind- 
say was born in Rockbridge county, 
Va., Sept. 4, 1835, and began to 
practice law at Clinton, Hickman 
county, Kv., in 1858. He entered 
the Confederate ramy as a private and 
rose to the rank of captain before the 
Civil war closed. He was a state sen- 
ator from 1867 to 1870 and for the 
following years was judge in the Ken- 
tucky court of appeals, being chief 
justice for the last two years of that 
time. After retiring from the bench 
he established a law practice in 
Frankfort, and in 1889 was elected 
state senator from that district. He 
was a member of the Columbian 
AVorld's fair commission from its or- 
ganization to 1893. He declined an ap- 
pointment as a member of the inter- 
state commerce commission. In 1893 
he was elected United States senator 
to fill a vacancy caused by the res- 
ignation of John G. Carlisle, and was 
re-elected in 1894. He was a United 
States commissioner for the St. Louis 
exposition. 

CANADIAN PA( IFK'S 

BOAT LITTLE DAMAGED. 

Montreal, Can., Oct. 15. — The steam- 
sliip Empress of Ireland, inbound from 
Liverpool, which was damaged by 
striking an obstruction supposed to be 
a sunken wreck between Cape Chatt- 
and Miitano, yesterday, arrived at Que- 
bec under her own steam today, twelve 
hcurs late. Canadian Pacific railway 
officials say the damage sustained bv 
the ship was slight. She carried l,12u 
pi.ssengers. The accident caused nei- 
ther panic nor alarm on board. It i? 
expected that the vessel will make her 
usual sailing from Quebec for Liver- 
pool next Friday. 




9cthe Yardfor 12V2C 

Zephyr Ginghams 

A well known brand and quality— sell here at 12^c the 
^^ yard, though some stores sell it for more--a -^ 
Or* big assortment of plain colors, checks, plaids ^Q 
^^ and stripes— just what are wanted for women s " ^ 
house dresses, boys' waists, and children's wear— special 
tomorrow, Oc the yard. 

75e COTTON BATTS, eOc. 

Large one-piece Cotton Batts, 
weight three pounds — open out 
in one sheet, size 72x84 inches. 
Just the thing to make com- 
forts — no trouble to use — spe- 
cial tomorrow, 60c. 



10c CRETONNES, 8c. 

The splendid quality Cre- 
tonnes we sell regularly at 
10c suitable for comforts 
and for work bags, laun- 
dry bags, etc., light and 
dark colors: special Sat- 
urday, 8c the yard. 



OUR 



New York Oct. 15. — A receiver was 
appointed today for Solomon Bros., 
dealers in Oriental goods. The firm 
has branches In Pittsburg. Cleveland. 
Cliicago and St. Louis, fhe creditors 
who asked t ohave the Arm bankrupted 
alleged that Solomon Bros.. before 
closing the firm's New York store last 




WARM OUTING FLANNEL GOWNS 
WERE M.4.DB FOR YOU. 

o^ ^onv wnmpn have told us that they couldn't possi- 

^^''°r^n^^ nt nice fleecy outings that wash well, in whit-; 

and made "1 «I.^^f-„^% Jmon kinds, because we have these 
^"adrto'ou¥"nVrrust"arwe thought you would like to 

have them. ^^^.tv*; AT ''nc TO »2..%0 

?HTLmtEVs"«i?TlI.''J GoWnS AT 50c AND ««c 



14c for 18c Manchester Chambrays 

These are extra wide, extra quality S2-lnch Manchester 
Chambrays— they're warranted fast colors, pinks, browns, 
blueT and gray^our regular price 18c— special Saturday, 
14c the yard. 

85c FOR S6-INCH DUPLEX EIDERDOWN. 

The best and warmest Eiderdown— full yard wide — our 
regular dollar quality in light blue, red and gray— special 
tomorrow, S5c the yard. 



50c LA BLACHE FACE POWDER 39c 

29c PYRALIN COMB 21c 

25c DR. GRAVES' TOOTH POWDER 17c 

50c DAGGETT & RAMSDELL CREAM 43c 

15c WHISK BROOM 10c 

10c HOUSEHOLD AMMONIA «« 

18c CARNATION MILK ^^ 



iiinery ; 

$ 1 2.00 

A Copy of an $8 Model Cor- 
set on sale at $2 tomorrow 

Tomorrow, we place on sale at $2.00, a Corset 
fashioned after an $8.00 model. It is a Warner 
Rust Proof Corset, with fashionable, medium low 
bust and very long hip. It is especially adapted 

for the medium figure, to 
wear under the Jersey one- 
piece Moyen-Age dress. If 
interested, ask to see style 
No. 73, which is very similar 
to cut. 

Other new models in 
Warner Rust Proof 
Corsets at $1 to $5. 
A complete line and full 
range of sizes — most fash- 
ionable models for the pre- 
vailing styles in dress, at 
prices ranging from 

$1.00 to $5.00 

The numbers offered at $1 
and $1.50 are unequalled 
values in popular priced 
Corsets. 




THE NEW KID. 



Chicago News: Chester bustled in 
with an air of great importance. Tak- 
ing off his hat he reached up and hung 
It on its hook instead of giving it the 
careless twirl by means of which it 
cu«5tomarily attained that position. 

"Say. Dave," he began, "there's a 
new kid comin' today and we better — ' 

"Well don't I know it?" interrupted 
David. "Think you're tellin' me a 

secret?" 

"Aw, g'wan!" exclaimed Chester. 
"You never knew a thing about it till 
I just told you." ^ ,, TT 

"I did, too," retorted David. He 



added, chuckling: "You kin learn_ a 
lot if you git down early enough. 

"Well anyhow." pursued Chester, 
"it's a good thing for the boss that he 
made up his mind to get in another 
helper. I tell you I wasn't goln' to 
stand for it much longer. it s a 
fricht the way we had to work and 
Se havln' so much responsibility an' 
all Just between me and you l was 
flgiirln- on lookln' for another-- 

Cliester's voice died away as the of- 
fice manager appeared with a rea- 
haired boy in tow. 

"Good morning, boys, said the man- 
aEer "I've brought you an assistant. 
Tills' is—" He turned inquiringly to 

^^^-jlilfn'^FiuieSa. sir." supplied the 



youth, promptly. 

"Well, John, hang up your hat and 
the boys will tell you abcut the work." 

The manager walked away. x„i,,„o. 

"Well. John," began Chester, taking 
possession of the Hoor \v ith an imita- 
tion of the managers manner, I might 
as well begin to put you wise to the 
job. There's a lot to learn in this de- 
nartmeur. We have to copy all the 
letters and index the leUerbooks and 
sort out the mail, and answer the 
switch bo.trd and run, the buzzer calls 
and chase out on errands. I gen lly 
run the switchboard myself, becuz Mr. 
Scldens awful particular 't>out the 

hcne calls, and I guesj; David better 
r.if'st of the indexin' and copyln 



I 



for awhile, and you kiit run the 
rar.ds and answer buzzeis at nrst. 



er 

till 



you get kinder used to the work." 

A whirring at ihe 6witchboard 
drew Chester's attention aside for a 
moment. The new kid thereupon 
winked an impudent green eye at Da- 
vid, who responded by half-closing a 
round blue orb. , ^, , ^ , ^ 

"Well." resumed Chester, turning 
again to the new kid, "let me see — 
oh. yes. They're awful particular 
about bein' respectful to the heads of 
departments 'round here, too, so when 
you speak to me you'd better just call 
me 'sir.' " , _, 

Chester paused reflectively. The 
new kid, leaning against a table, 
crossed his knees, thrust his hands in- 
to his pockets and regarded Chester 
between partly shut eyelids. 

"Aw. lade away, kid," be remarked, 



languidly. "Don't you try to work any 
of your answer-the-buzzer-till-you-get- 
on--to-the-job games on me. I indexed 
more books and copied more letters 
than you ever seen in your life, and I 
kin run any old kind of a switchboard 
that ever was put In." He drew one 
hand from his pocket and leveled a 
forefinger at Chester. "And. look 

here," he said, 'you better not come 
round me with any of your fresh talk 
•bout me callin' you 'sir,' unless you 
want to get pasted one in the lamp. I 
ain't lookin' fer no scrap, but if they's 
goln 'to be one it ain't me they'll be 
carrin' out feet first when It's all 
over. See!" , , 

He straightened up In a leisurely 
manner, strolled over to the switch 
board where Chester sat and 



calmly down upon the enraged, but 
speechless youth. 

"Now," he observed, "If you'r« 
through throwln' bokays at yerself, an 
'one o' you kids'll put me wise to 
where you keep things in this little 
old joint and who belongs to the 
buzzers, I'll get to work. 

KEY WEST APPEAL 

IS SENT TO TAFT. 



Washington. Oct. 15.— Appeal waa 
made today to President Taft by the 
v.i^„- mayor of Key West for aid for the 
gazed hurricane sufferers. 



' 



•^ 



■■ 




T 



t' 



J 



1 
I 

I 




1 

•) 

1 

t 


I 








1 



10 



RAILROADS' 
VASTNEEDS 

Are Not Yet Prepared for 

Handling the Coimtry's 

Business. 



Traffic Already Growing Far 
More Rapidly Than Rail- 
road Facilities. 



New York, Oct. 15. — The Wall Street 
Summary says: Kichard H. Edmonds, 
editor of the Manufacturers' Record of 
Baltimore, while in New York the oiher 
day. In an interview with a reporter of 
the New York News Bureau, said: 

"Though general business throughout 
the country has not yet joined fully in 
the remarkable activity prevailing in 
Iron and steel, railroad-s are already 
becoming congested with trurtic and 
many complaints of scarcity of cars 
are heard in Alabama and West Vir- 
ginia and other iron and coal centers. 

"We are now producing iron at ihe 
rate of nearly 30.000,000 tons a year, 
or over 3,000,000 tons above the record 
output of 1907. If other industries were 
AS active as iron and steel land they 
must inevitably become so), railroads 
would be as much overwlielmed with 
business as they were wlien ilie rail- 
road system of the country practically 
collapsed in the summer and fall of 
1907. Moreover, the really marvelous 
actlvltv in iron and steel is as yet 
without the benefit of heavy railroad 
purchases of materials. When railroad 
buying attains the heavy totals which 
their necessities will force in tlie near 
future, the danger to the country will 
be a scramble tor Iron and steel pro- 
ducts, with the possibility of a run- 
away market. There is possibly as 
much danger in a spei illative iron mai- 
ket as in a wild stock speculation. If 
prices go loo high, consumption is 
checked, but wiiile consumption is ab- 
sorbing such a vast amount of iron as 
at present, the iron trade must of 
necessity be crowded at high pressure. 
<>reat Kxpaudlon in NiKbt. 

••What will liapv>eri when all busi- 
ness revives it is liard to say. but it is 
quite certain that tlie outlook indicates 
a very great expansion in every lead- 
ing industry to keep in touch with the 
remarkable expansion of iron and steel. 
The railroads seem to be at last wak- 
ing up to the situation, but they have 
been so slow in doing tliis that traffic 
Is already growing far more rapidly 
than railroad facilities, and tiie danger 
ahead of us is a collapse in railroads 
from inability to handle freight. Every 
day is simply emphasizing the fact 
that railroad expansion has not kept 
up with the growth of the country, 
and that at least $5,0u0,0i'u.000 to $»>.- 
000,000.000 would be required to push 
railroad building and enlarging of 
railroad operations to a point where 
facilities for handling freight would 
equal the demands of the next two or 
three years. If Jl.ooO.OOO.OOO a year 
for the next ten years could be ex- 
pended upon railroad construction tlio 
facllitfes at that time would not equal 
the certainty of the demand. Any leg- 
islative action that delays the in- 
vestment needed for railroad construc- 
tion simply intensifies tlie situation 
and really makes all present railroads 
a greater monopoly than If railroad 
construction could be broadly pushed 
in all directions. 

Serurlnic Ore Siipi»llc.'». 

"In connection with this marvelous 
expansion in iron and sieel, it is evi- 
dent that the great steel operators are 
endeavoring to safeguard the futur-.- by 
the purchase or cir.trol by lease of 
the sources of ore supplies. The an- 
nouncement that the I?ethlehem Steel 
corporation has secured one of the 
Ipige ore properties of Nortliern New 
York follows very quickly after the 
leport that it has arranged for heavy 
investments in Texus, where, accord- 
ing to reports made by the Santa Fe 
railroad to the state railroad commis- 
sion, contracts have been made for 
opening up ore i)roperties with a view 
to furnishing the Bethleliem people 
1.000,000 tons of Tex.'is ore a year. 

"Similar efforts are being made in 
many directions as to coking coal 
properties, as well as ore properties, 
shi wing that the f.u-seeing men oi to- 
dav are recognizing the tremendous 
future through th<^ ownership of the 
raw materials for iron and steel mak- 
ing. 

Future Iron Production. 

"It is liardly to be expected tliat the 
rate of iron production which lias pre- 
vailed during the last forty years will 
continue for the next ten. but if it did 
so ccmtinue it would, as shown in a 
recent paper by Prof. Porter of the 
University of Cincinnati, carry pig iron 
production in 1920 to 85.000.o00 tons. 
It is. however, entirely within reason 
to estimate that iron production will 
double bv 1920. and give us at tliat 
time between 50,000,000 and 60,000.000 
tons, which would mean a practical 
doubling of the entire iron, coke and 
Bteel industries of the country. As 
other industrial activities in the long 
run keep pace with iron and steel, this 
would mean that the general traffic 
of the country In ten years will be 
flouble. unless so hampered b.v rail- 
road facilities as to make this impos- 
ulble. The problem of the day, there- 
fore, is to make a possibility the find- 
ing of the $10,000,000,000 needed for 
railroad expansion during the next ten 
years." 

Sturm Sash and Doors. 

Any size, made quickly to order. Tele- 
Idione today 112.. Duluth Lumber Co. 
* 

Don't complain about the cost of 
living. Barthe-Martin sell groceries 
fct wholesale. 

HOTEL MAN CALLED. 



W. S. Harris of North Brauch 
Passed Away on \\ edncsdaj. 

Nortli Branch, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — W. S. Harris, 
proprietor of the Sherman house and 
u'ell known among the hotel men of 
this section, died Wednesday. 

Born In Canada in 1842. Mrs. Harris 
had reached the age of 67 .vears. He 
came to Harris, Minn., about twenty 
years ago, where he lived until a year 
ago when he came to North Branch to 
conduct the .Sherman hotel. He is 
Burviwd by his wife, and one son by a 
former marriage. King Harris of Min- 
neapolis and five stepcliildren living 
in this village. 

The funeral will be held Sunday 
morning at 11 o'clock from the Metho- 
dist church. Rev. Ralph officiating. 
The remains will be buried at the cem- 
etery at Sunrise. 



NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW 

BEOINS AT MILWAUKEE. 



Milwaukee, Wis., Oct. 15. — The fourth 

national dairy show which is to hold 
forth at the Auditorium building in 
Milwaukee for the next ten days, had 
Its formal opening last night, when 
President Taft, from the Grand canyon, 
pressed the button whicli gave the 
the signal to start tlie machinery. 

The opening session was presided 
pver b.v Governor James O. Davidson. 
Judge Paul D. Carpenter of Milwaukee 
flellvered the address of welcome, to 
which President Colin C, LlUle re- 
sponded. 

During the season of the show con- 
jrentlons of various dairy bodies will 
>e held. 



— .^mAmI^CBm* 



■^->- '^-^'' -^-^ 



^ 



Save Money on These ! 



100 dozen Windsor Ties, guaranteed — 
25c values — at 



Special Extraordinary. 
300 Little Fellows' Suits, sizes 3 to 16 
Values from $3.50 to $7.50. Choice 





Read These Items 
Carefully, They are 
Big Money Savers. 

Sox for men, boys and girls 
— extra special. 

200 dozen Misses', Children's 
and Boys* Merino and Cotton 
Hose, 23c to 35c val- "1 ^1-^ 
lies, per pair Jl ^2^ 

200 dozen fancy black and tan 
Cotton Sox, 15c val- d%gy 

ues, for OC 

35c fancy Cashmere 1 Or* 
and Lisle Hose, for. ... 1, ^C 

$1.00. 75c and 50c Lisle OQ-^ 

and Silk Hose, for xC 

Fine Cashmere Hose, "l 'Tr* 
25c values, for JL / C 

Heavy wool Sox, slightly 
soiled — 50c values, ^0#% 

for ^3rC 

Medium weight Wool | ^f% 
Sox, 25c values, for...J[^C 

35c heavy Wool I 0#% 

Sox, for M^K/ 

50c extra heavy Wool Sox, in 
perfect condition, ^ 'J ^^ 

lor «J JC 

Shaw-Knit Sox are contracted 
goods and are sold the country 
over for 25c — our ^ ^ /rs 

price 1/C 

200 dozen fast black Hose — 
25c values — - ^ ^^^% 
choice i £^2^ 

Men's and Boys* Gloves and 
Mittens at less than the cost 
of the raw material. 

A large quantity of Canvas 
Gloves and Mittens, legular 
10c values — A 

per pair , bC 

Men's Leather Gloves and Mit- 
tens, lined, regular 25c and 35c 
values — your 1 ^^^ 

choice JL^C 

50c Gloves and Mit- ^ 1 ^^ 
tens ; your choice ^ J[ \j 

75c Gloves and Mit- ^^^^ 
tens; your choice O^C 

$1.25 Horsehide Gloves and 
Mittens — your ^d%^s 

choice / OC 

Horsehide unlined Mittens. — 
75c values — your ^0<* 

choice ^^C 

$1.00 Horsehide Gloves and 
Mittens, slightly soiled A Q^^ 
— your choice TrOC 

The famous Sargent Union- 
made R. R. Gauntlet Gloves — 
sold the country over for 

tf'r^r: 88c 

$1.25 Sargent Union-made 
horsehide Gloves — ^di^m, 
for.. /DC 

Boys' Gauntlets, % di^s 

50c quality J| OC 

Boys' pure wool Gloves, 35c 
and 25c values — 1 ^#% 

for l£fC 

Men's W^ool Yarn Mittens — 
25c values — \ ^ £\ 

for l^C 

Men's extra heavy Wool Mit- 
tens — 50c values — ^^.-^ 
for J^C 

Men's extra heavy wool Mitts, 
slightly .soiled — 50c ^iifs 
values — for ^OC 




Of the Kolliner Bros. & Newman stock of Stillwater, Minn.; The 
Hubbard Bros., Kansas City, Mo., and the Raupp & Young Co. of 
Decatur, 111. stocks; also the L. B. Qisness Co. stock of 2023 West 
Superior Street, and manufacturers' clean=up stocks amounting 
to over $100,000 of high class wearing apparel for men, young 
men and boys will be sold tomorrowand continued until disposed of. 

;¥EB¥ ITEl OMEFULLY 2 -^i 





Men's Fine Dress & Work Pants 

At Less Than Wholesale Cost. 

$5.00 PANTS :. . .'.^ ^2.75 

$4.00 PANTS. .' ^1.98 

$3.00 PANTS r^rrr. $1.59 

$3.00 PANTS— slightly soiled- .^ 98< 

$4.00 EXTRA HEAVY PANTS. ..*/.. ll ^1.99 

$2.50 ALL-WOOL WORK PANTS^^JT $1.39 

$3.50 and $3.00 PANTS .V'.T^.. S1.79 

McMillan high-grade $4.00 pants. . . .^2.79 
McMillan $3.50 high-grade f ajsts. . • . .$2.39 

Suits and Overcoats 

Men's and Young Men's higli-grade this season's up-to- 
date Suits and Overcoats, containing the famous Hirsh- 
Wickvvire, Class A Yiking system, and Friend ■& Marx 
Progressive Suits and Overcoats — ^^values ^ | /| ^ ^ 
up to $27.50 ^ 1 4«/ 3 

500 Suits and Overcoats, cotltaining the above me.ntiened 
famous makes — values up to .ff2;50 — ^\ If f7iS 

300 Up-to-date Suits and Overcoals/would be considered 
cheap at other stores for $15.00— '-^i»WB'^»' ^O ^fg 
here r i-v.-rs3:»?s:r .- . tpO»# 3 

285 Suits and Overcoats— values $12.0()''. ^jT fyg' 
to $15.00— for v «pll«/ 3 

268 Suits and Overcoats— $10.00 to $12.00 i"! fyC 
values — for ^v)«# 3 



Underwear 

Of the best makes in the United States, way below the 
wholesale cost. 

Extra heavy fleece-lined Underwear — a good ^0#* 

50c garment — for ^^C 

A fine Egyptian heavy ribbed Underwear — ^Or* 

75c value — for O^C 

Pure wool-ribbed Underwear, guaranteed — $1.25 QQ#% 
values — during this sale O^C/ 

Fine Wool L^nderwear — $2.25 values — ^t AQ 

for $ 1 ,40 

$1.75 Underwear— for $1.18 

Fine Camel's Hair Underwear — $1.25 values — for.... 79c 

Dunham pure v/ool ribbed Underwear — OQjn 

$1.50 values— for !? OC 

A complete line of high-grade Union Suits too numer- 
ous to describe, will be sold during this sale for less than 
manufacturer's cost. 

To convince yourself, come here Saturday and yon will 
see the greatest bargains ever offered by any solvent in- 
stitution in America. 



Shirts of every Description 

Way Below Wholesale Cost. 

Soft Negligee Shirts, slightly soiled^ 4IOO OOr* 

to $2.50 values — for ,. ^/d/ 

R. R. Blue Shirts— $1.25 values— '-*^ AQ/% 

for ,«♦. ,. U/C 

Fine All-wool Flannel Shirts— $2.50.;v';*^« ■ ^11 -^Q 
values, — for vs. . ►*» . . . S JL a^^ 

A lot of burned Shirts— 50c to 75c V- "'7 ^ 

values — for — eaoh ;•.,,., «3C 

100 dozen White Stiff Bosom Union-made >i fi#% 

Elgin Shirts, regular $1.00 values, for: .^;.. 40Q 

50 dozen Work Shirts^ — values up to^; ^'•'; ^Qgs 

75c — for j.wa* mf^^ 

•■■■ ■.-.i^iL 

500 dozen Elgin, Lion and Cluett- bratid Coat Shirts, 
pleated, with and without attached cuffs — - iiO^^ 
values from $1.00 to $1.50, for DOC 

neckwear. 

300 dozen Men's fine Silk Neckwear, all styles, ^Aj^ 
from 50c to $1.00 JVC 



Shoes for Men and Boys 

The famous Walk-Over Shoes, $3.50 and $1.00 0^ r£% 
grade, all styles and leathers, for q^^aOO 

Bostonian $3.50 Shoes — on sale ^^ HQ 

for $i&.GO 

Ralston Health Shoes, standard price $4.00 — ^^ ^© 
on sale for tpM'* vO 

Stetson $7.00, $6.00 and $5.00 Shoes— ^O ^A 

on sale here for ^^^i^ ■ 

Walk-Over Shoes— $5.00 grade— on sale for $3.24 

$:3.00 and $3.50 Shoes of the Mayer & Weber m <^ -J JJ 
Bros.— for !p^«00 

$3.00 Dress and Work Shoes— on sale for $1.83 

Boys' $2.50 and $2.00 Shoes, all sizes and ^| ^Q 
leathers — on sale for ^ ^ •O^ 

Boys' and Girls' Sandals— $1.25 values— rfiftn 

for •:*.i^^ vO\/ 

SPECIAL EXTRAORDINARY— Children's Oxfords— 
The Pla Mate and Educator brands— $2.00 ^(l/\ 

to $1.25 values, for. JVC 

Misses' and Children's Patent Ties, $1.25 to $2.00 ^O^ 
values — all sizes — for / OC 

Men's Everstick Rubbers, sold everywhere for ilO,#* 
$1.00— here DOC 

Men's fine one-buckle Arctics — $1.25 grade — for 98c 





// for any reason purchases made here prove 
unsatisfactory, money will be gladly refunded. 
Open Saturday till 1 1 p. m. — week days till 6. 




rrr—" 



Read These Items 
Carefully, They are 
Big Money Savers. 

Hats 

The following famous $3 
Hats — Tiger, Hawes, Bell- 
mont, Roswelle and Gor- 
don — special ^ | QQ 

$2.50 Guaran- (I ^O 
teed Hats ^l.HO 

$2.00 Hats for $1.39 

$1.50 Hats for 79^ 

Stetson $5.00 Hats $3.24 
Special 15c Fancy Border 
Hemstitched Hand- figs 
kerchiefs, at .^^ 

Sweater Goats 

For Men, Boys and Ladies 
—$2.00 all-wool Qftp 
Sweater Coats at . . 70C 

$5 Pure Worsted Sweater 
Coats — special ^O ^A 

$4 Pure Worsted Sweater 
Coats — special ^^ SO 

$1.50 Sweater 78r 

Coats at y OC 

Fine Lisle Web Suspend- 
ers, 50c values ^ii^% 
-at VOC 

Extra Special 

$3.50 Canadian wool Stag 
Shirts, slightly 7Qr 

soiled, for ' ^\^ 

$3.50 Canadian W^ool Stag 
Shirts, in perfect condition 
— on sale for ^4 'Ift 
only tP±./y 

Hackinaws 

$5.00 and $6.00 Canadian 
wool Mack- ^O fiO 

inaws at ^0%%3Q 

$4.00 and $4.50 Canadian 
Wool Mack- J2 (SL 
inaws at ^^^DO 

Sheep-lined Coats and 
Mackinaws way below the 
wholesale cost. 

Winter Caps at less than 
wholesale prices. 

Special Extraordinary — 
Fine all-wool kersey, plush 
lined, with rat trimmed 
collar and edges— $22.50 
values, for ^ 1 ^ 7ft 
only tpl*t,/3 

Overalls 

Almost Given Away. 

Shore Brand Union Made 
Overalls, slightly soiled — 
90c grade— ' gA 

75c and 90c Over- A^g^ 
alls at 4/i&C 

50c and 75c Overalls — 
soiled — your ^^f\ 

choice at £0m0\j 




— ■ j^. 



-*^- 



"m-'mmm'm^'—^Hi • 








It 



; 



fr»- 



i 



r »■ 



=f= 



•^f^r^-t^i 



fi^aiSaifSM^mtmmm 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



:UGIN MINUTES 



AN on-time watch 
sets a good ex- 
ample in punc- 
tuality. Nothing could 
more emphasize the 
value of a minute than 
the infinite care put into 
all Elgin Watches to make 
them accurate-to-the* 
minute timekeepers. 
The watchword is 



iJl 



>r 



LUX 



G. M. WHEELER Model 16 Size 

Pendant Winding and Setting. Seventeen 
jewels. Ruby and sapphire balance and center 
jewels. Conipcnfating ba.ancc. Breguct hair- 
spring, with micrometre resulator. Adjusted 
to temperature, isochronisni, throe positions. 
Patent recoiling click and seM-locking setting 
dcvi.e. Dust ring. Plates damaskeened. En- 
graving inlaid with gold. Cased and timed in 
case at factory. Open face and hunting cases. 

In Filled Gold Cases. $2S and up. 

In 5oUd Goid Cases. $45 and up. 

Other Elgin models at other prices according 
to grade ol movement and case. 

All Elgin mwdels are sold by jewelers every- 
where, and are tully guaranteed. 

ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH COMPANY, 

Elgin. Illinou. 



Dl&l shown 

U the new 

No. 7«. 



i^/ 



'9 
.8 



"42 



Jll-Si 



SITUATION 
SO STRONG 

Thai the Price of Structural 
Steel Has Been Ad- 
vanced. 




THE ONLY 



Stout Premium for Quick De- 
liveries Has Also Been 
Orderei 



2: 



4: 



* . u 




: 




♦»It is the Best Tonic Made. Call up 241, 
Duluth Brewing & Malting Co.' 



»» 



VISIT THE SCHOOL THEY 

AHENDEOIN 1866. 



Battle Creek. Mich., Oct. 15.— Facing 
their teatner of Civil war day?, a score 
of el'lerly men ard women answered to 
the same roll call in Austin district 
echool a few days ago that wfi.« read to 
them in 1SS6 try Eliza Morris, their 
teacher. Miss Morris, or Mrs. Kliza 
Morris Osborn. sat behind the old desk 
end read the list. One by one the boy.s 
and girls said "Present," but there 
were some names to which there were 
no responses. 

The "pupils" came when the bell 
rar.^. carrying their frazzled books and 
frlates ui.der their arms. After roll 
tall they recited geography and arith- 
metic, with more errors than the 
teacher would liave allowed in 1S66. 
Tiien they had recess and nearly every 
one ate from a tin dinner pail pre- 
served for two score years. Then tliey 
jlaved sciiool ga.mes. 

Jfany of the for.nier pupils had come 



Irom long distances to greet their old 
teadier. Mrs. Osborn now is an octo- 
genarian. 



BOY FLED FROM HOSPITAL. 

Seven-Year-Cld Feared Operation, 
But Consented to Return. 

Winsted, Corn., Oct. 15.— Jules. 7- 
year-old son of Jule% Bachenet of 
Torrlngion, was taken back to a hos- 
pital In Hartford to undergo an opera- 
tion on his head. He was first taken 
to the institution a week ago, but on 
the eve of the day set for the opera- 
tion he escaped, arriving at home in 
Torrington Saturday. 

"Geo!" raid Jules to his father. "I 
wasn t going to stay there and be all 
lul up and have to lie in bed for a 
whole week." 

When told he might die unless the 
operation ^>as performed, the boy con- 
sented to return to the hospital. 



New York, Oct. 15.— The Iron and 
steel situation has grown so strong 
and hearty that the manufacturers of 
structural steel indulged last week in 
an advance in price of ?2 per ton, and 
are charging a stout premium for 
quick deliveries. The steel rail condi 
lions are now all in favor of the man 
ufacturers, who are said to have orders 
not only for the full amount of pro- 
duction lor 1909, but for several 

months in 1910. 

Take the commercial, the industrial 
and the financial conditions the coun- 
try over and they seem to be in the 
very best sliape, and our people are 
filled with confldfrnce of continueil 
prosperity. As to the view of business 
taken by importers of those affect- 
ed by depression and the last to 
ftel prosperity, I would cite the fact 
that during the month of September 
last tlie value of the diamonds im- 
ported into this country exceeded the 
rtcord of su^h iniporiations in • any 
September in our history. 

The importations amounted to $2,G52,- 
340 in cut precious stones and pearls, 
while the uncut diamonds amounted to 
$666,001. a great total of $3,318,314 in 
tlie one month. 

Confidcaee In Good Time*. 

That these importers bring in such 
enormous valuations in jewels shows 
lull well their confidence In good times 
and in the ability of cur people to pay 
for them. So with oil paintings, an- 
other of the class of articles for which 
there is little or no demand in dull or 
depressed times. 

It is said there are at this present 
writing more than $1,000,000 worth of 
Gil paintings stored In the custon; 
warehouses here, awaiting Instructions 
from Washington as to the application 
of the new tariff schedules. 

The majority of our importations 
from France are luxurious, and no 
country in the world was a greater 
loser in trade in conseyuence of tlie 
depression here succeeding the panic 
of 1907 than was France. In the first 
six days of October the invoices of 
exports from France to us, in the dis- 
trict of that republic supervised by 
Consul General Mason, showed an in- 
crease of nearly $6,000,000 in value 
over the invoice values of the same 
days in 1908. While these Increases 
In cur imports from France are the 
proofs of our own better times, they 
go far to brighten \\p French trade 
and to stimulate both the agricultural 
and industrial interests of that country. 
Kxtrome High Levela. 

It is to be hoped that in the iron and 
steel business prices will not be rushea 
to extreme high levels and consumers 
called upon to pay all they can be 
forced to pay for deliveries. It is far 
better that construction in all th^» 
forms in which iron and steel are used 
be encouraged by reasonable prices for 
n aterial than to have the demand 
check.?d, dwarfed and limited by ex- 



in the city where your money counts triple. SI of your 
money with us will go as far as |3 elsewhere. 



3c 

.6^ 








DEMONSTRATION 



AND 



LECTURE O N MOOR E'S RANGE 

A competent cook and a factory salesman will be here to demon- 
strate and explain the many advantages and laboi 
saving features of Moore's Range 



Moore's Range will be In full operation vi(ithout chimney connection. The gas and 
smoke Is consumed by Moore's Everlasting Firebaclc. 

Moore's Range has a Olass Oven Door 

You can watch the process o? roasting and baking. There Is no lost heat by 

opening oven door unnecessarily 

Moore's Oven Thermometer and Mrs. Borer's Thermometer Guide and Moore's 
Controller Damper make baking easy, and save fuel and your time 

Moore's Hinged Top is handy for broiling meat and toasting bread and Is conven- 
ient for feeding the fire 

The cook will show you how Moore's Anti-Scorch Lid prevents burning of cereals, 

milk or preserves 

Don't fail to see this Wonderful Moore's Range 

EVERYBODY IMVITEO EVEBYBODY WELCOME 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 19, 20 




Fit ^^ ^<«^ • 

Second f venue East and Suparior Street. 




"furniture Spscialists." 



One more lot of Fine Ginghams, worth 10c yard, 
On sale tomorrow at, per yard 

Fine Lawns,' worth 35c yard — go at 

Fine Linings, worth 18c yard, going at 

All-wool Dress Goods, double width, positively 

worth $1.00 yard, on Saturday, per yard 36^ 

Embroideries, worth 10c yard, go now at per yd. .2^ 

Laces, worth 10c yard, go now at, per yard 2^ 

Ladies' Corsets, regular $1.50, go at 49< 

Ladies' Skirts, rcgiUar $6.00, to go Saturday. . .$1.98 

Ladies' Jackets, 150 in the lot, choice 98^ 

Girls' Coats, worth up to $6.00, go at $1.98 

Children's Bearskin Hoods, regular $1.00, go at.. 24^ 

Ladies' Black' Hose, regular 25c, go at 7^ 

Men's Socks, worth 15c, go at 4^ 

Men's 10c Handkerchiefs go at 3^ 

Men's Blue and Red Handkerchiefs, reg. 10c, go at 3^ 

75c Men's Overshirts go at 29^ 

Men's Pants, worth $2.00, now at 69^ 



Men's $10 Suits 





goat 



Boys' $5 Suits 



goat 




$1.98 



Mens $1 Sweat- 
ers go at 

W. L. Douglas' Shoes and 

Oxfords, positively worth | " ^^S- ^-^•^^' ^^ 

$3.50. To close 'out Sat- | Regular $1.50 Men's Wool 

urday at, per ^ J /[Q | Underwear go RQa 



Men's $12.00 
Overcoats at 

Boys' $5.00 
Coats go at . 

Men's Underwear, regular 
50c — Saturday i C^ 

at IOC 

Men's L^nderwear 



43c 



pair 



$ 1 .49 



at 



Ladies' Underwear goes at 12^ 

100 pair Ladies' Shoes and Oxfords, positively AQfk 
worth up to $3.00, go Saturday at ■fwU 



Complete lines of Men's, Women's and Children's 
Men's Winter Fur-lined Caps, regular $1, go at 39^ Shoes and Rubbers go at One-Half. 



When in your life have you been able to buy Men's, Boys,' Ladies' and Chil- 
dren's Clothing, Shoes and Furnishing Goods as low as 33c on the dollar ? 






SUCCESSORS TO NORDBY ^ERO/I^TILE GO. 

1 7 Second Avenue West, Between Superior and First Streets. 

Open Every Evening Until 9 P. M. Saturday Until 11 P. M. 




orbltant prices for the supplies or ex- 
tortionate premlun.s for quick deliv- 

There is a strong feelirg abroad In 
this land that the iron and steel peo- 
ple are making fair and reasonable 
profits at tlie prices which have been 
scheduled for the last few months, and 
there is sure to follow resentment and 
displeasure from the ultimate consum- 
ers If they are made to feel a rise in 
prices at the word of a combine or the 
desire of a monopoly to extort from 
those who use the articles manufac- 
tured. ^ ^, , , 
It is to the interest of the people of 
the Union to have the iron and steel 
business expand, extend and flourish, 
and It would not only be business sui- 
cide, but invoke almost national dis- 
aster If prices of steel ard iron prod- 
ucts be raised to such levels as would 
destroy the demand. 

PlaytnK of Pollolra. 
It is not the time for the playing 
of policies to "get rich quick" at the 
expense of other business interests or 
at the cost of the masses of the 
people. The cotton manufacturers of 
New England are considering the 
question of curtailing Hharply the 
hours of labor of their operatives in 
view of the high price of cotton pre- 
vailing at this time. They are not 
uneasy over the situation as to the 
supply of the staple or the price they 
will have to pay for it In the future. 

The new crop of cottcn Is not as 
large as of some late years; the organ- 
izations looking to the control of the 
new crop were never so well equipped 
to Bucceeed in cornering it as they are 
today; the foreign and tlie home de- 
mand is very good, and that in Itself 
is a factor that renders control easier 
and more desirable to these who seek 
to do with cotton this winter what 
was done with wheat last spring. 

It is to ward off this impending 
evil of a corner that the manufactur- 
ers of New England propose to curtail 
production and thus curtail con- 
sumption of the raw material and 
make it difficult for speculators to 
victimize them on the price of tlie cot- 
ton they need to keep their mills in 
operation. 

Jumped up in Piriee. 
We have in this movement of the 
cotton manufacturers a \*arning as to 
what would undoubtedly happen if 
steel and iron products are jumped up 
in price to high figures. 

Construction would feel the effect 
Immediately; new contracts would 
cease to be offered, and pending nego- 
tiations for work in many lines would 
be summarily closed. Conservatism in 
all branches of our commercial and In- 
dustrial affairs at this time is espe- 
cially desirable, and whil( the reaction 
from the depression in many lines of 
manufacturing may seemingly furnisn 
the opportunity to exploit the public, it 
would prove to be but of short dura- 
tiono and have a disastrous close ii 
such exploiting were attempted. 

Profits in manuacturing in our lead- 
ing staple articles are said to be ample 
to insure good dividends, and it «s lar 
better, safer and saner to l^eep theni 
at a reasonable percentage than invite 
dull times by lessening the Jemand, 

A most interesting test of the Strang 
motor car for railways was made re- 
cently In a run of one of these cars 
from St. Louis to New York. The great 
expense of central power plants, the 
enormous costs of electrifying and 
equipping the leading systems which 
have considered the chang;e from steam 
to electricity, has induced the investi- 
gation of motor cars carrying their 
own Independent power plants. 
Speed and Povrer. 
The Strang company has been work- 
ing at the construction of such cars 
for several years, and 'It las built four 
cars which seem to come up to the 
requirements of speerd ard power, and 
are "aid to be capable of easy opera- 
tion upon a remarkably low cost per 
mile In the test just made the car 
left'st. Louis Sept. 2« and made the 
run to New York, under lis own power, 
without a single failure at any point 
or in any way. < , , j 

On portions of the track, level and 
without sharp curves, i". often made 
fifty-five to sixty-seven miles an hour, 
and when it reached its Eastern des- 
tination it was in as fine condition as 
when it started, and seemed fit for any 
kind of railway woffc. It needed no 
repairs on the trip, and none was re- 



quired when it had finished the jour- 
ney. 

Stops were made at Chicago, Detroit, 
Buffalo and Scranton, and thoroughly 
posted railway men inspected it at the 
several points, and, it is said, were well 
pleased with its operation. It is said 
that for subsidiary and suburban lines 
it will prove a great success. It is, in 
fact, a powerful and capacious rail- 
way automobile, and it certainly ap- 
pears to be applicable to a field of 
transportation where it can be of great 
service to tlie railways and to the pub- 
lic. 



BRIDE GOES WITH $1,300. 

Correspondence Wife Departs One 
Day After Wedding. 

Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 15. — Jospeh Ken- 
ertr, aged 41 years, a widower, em- 
ployed as a coal miner near Erie. Pa., 
had waited In vain for more than 
twenty-four hours for the return of a 
woman whom he had met and macrlcd 
and given $1,300 in Toledo the day pre- 
vious, he decided that he had been de- 
frauded and reported the matter to the 
police. After their wedding the woman 



secured from him the money, v.itli 
which, she said, she would purchii.-^j a 
millinery store in Lorain, Ohio. 

Kenerer said that uiiout two wo?!ts 
ago he advertised for a vifc in a To- 
ledo matrimonial paper. A few d.iys 
after, he said, he received a reply fr«nn 
a woman in Detroit, who gave her 
name as Myrtle Brown, aged 35, and 
after a brief correspondence he went 
to Detroit and met her. While they 
were ai ranging- details of their nii-r- 
riage, he said, the woman met a man 
with wiiom she held a brief private 
conversation. Kenerer i?aid he came to 
Toledo with the woman the next c'.ay 
and was n-arried here by a justice cf 
the peace. 

While waiting for his wife's retu.n 
Kenerer said tie met the man with 
whom his wife had talked in Detroit 
the day before their marriage and Jiat 
the stranger won J200 from him by 
betting on a lock trick. The Lorain 
police were notified, but no trace of 
tlie woman could he found. 



SALVE ON WOIND 



Pottsville, Pa., Oct. 15.— Playing with 
matches. Harry Guers, aged 8 years, 
svstained burns which caused his 



death. The boys palm previously had 

bten pierced by a nail. His mother 
bandaged thii hand, after putting on it 
a salve strongly piegnatcd with tur- 
pentine. Wi.pn the Jlame of one of the 
matches came in contact with the vola' 
tile substance it ignited and the arm 
was burned to a crisp. Blood poison- 
ing and then spinal meningitis devel- 
oped, bringing death. 

SHOT HERSELF AT ADANCE. 



English Woman Commits Suicide at 
BaU in St. Petersburg. 

St. Petersburg. Oct. 15. — A young 
English woman, whose name is stated 
to be Miss Slett, committed suicide 
under tragic circumstances at a ball 
given by Gen. Schlopeloff in this city. 

She da;iced frequently and appeared 
to be in tl e brst spirits. After a dance 
.•:he walked alone to a deserted corner 
of the ballroom, and a moment later 
a shot rang out. The other guests 
rushed to the spot, and were shocked 
to find that siie had shot herself 
through the heart with a small re- 
\olver. , , 

The weapon had been concealed all 
the evening in a silken bag which 
dangled at the girl's wrist. 



A Bad^e 






Is printed on the outer wrapper of every bottle of 

Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription 

and it is the only medicine for woman's peculiar ailments, 
sold by druggists, the makers of which feel fully warranted 
in thus taking the afflicted into their full confidence. 

The more known about the composition of 

Dr. Piercers Favorite Prescription the more 

confidently will invalid women rely upon it 

to cure their peculiar weaknesses and de^ 

ran^ements. There's no secrecy about its 

make=up—no deceptive inducements held out 

to the afflicted. It's simply a ^ood, honest, 

square = deal medicine with no alcohol, or 

injurious, habit'formin^ dru^s in its compO' 

sition. Made wholly from roots. It can do no harm in any 

condition of woman's organism. 

Devised and put up by a physician of vast experience in the treatment of woman's 
maladies. Its ingredients have the indorsement of leading physicians in all 
schools of practice. 

The "Favorite Prescription'' is known everywhere as the standard remedy 
for diseases of women and nas been so regarded for the past 40 years and more. 
Accept no secret nostrum in place of '^Favorite Prescription" — a medicine OF 
KNOWN COMPOSITION, with a record of 40 years of cures behind it. 

It's foolish and often dangerous to experiment with new or but slightly tested 
medicines — sometimes urged upon the afflicted as ''just as good" or better than 
"Favorite Prescription." The dishonest dealer sometimes insists that he knows 
what the proffered substitute is made of, but you don't and it is decidedly for your 
interest that you should know what you are taking into your stomach and system ex- 
pecting it to act as a curative. To him its only a difference of profit. Therefore, 
insist on having Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription. 

Send 31 one-cent stamps to pay cost of mailing only on a free copy of Dr. Pierce's 
Common Sense Medical Adviser, 1008 pages cloth-bound. 

World's Dispensary Medical Association, Proprietors, R. V. Pierce, M. D., 
President. Buffalo. N. Y. 



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12 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD! 



FRIDAY. OCTOBER 



1909. 



THE EVENING HERALD 

AN liNUKPEMJKXT NEWSPAPER. 



Published at Herald nuilding. First St., Duluth. Minn. 

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BY CARRIER, IN THE CITY, TEN CENTS A WEEK 

EVERY KVE.^lMi — DEHVEllED. 

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TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It Is Important when dtslrlng the addross of your paper 
changed, to give both the" old and new addresses. 



A THOU GHT FOR T ODAY. 

.1 proper secrecy is the only viystery of able 
men; mystery is the only secrecy of weak and 

cunniny ones. 

— Lord Chesterfield. 



AS TO PARTISANSHIP NOWADAYS. 

Frank M. Eddy, who says and writes brilliant things 
in which there is sometimes good common sense, said 
something the other day in a speech at Spring Valley, 
Minn., which is neither brilliant nor sensible. Said he: 

I have no sympathy with or admiration for this 
comparatively new political doctrine, which has 
recently sprung up in this country and has been 
so enthusiastically indorsed by near-statesmen and 
imitation editorial writers who have themselves be- 
come enamored with the idea, and who are so 
sedulously endeavoring to infatuate the public mind 
with the theory that party allegiance on the part 
of a citizen is undesirable if not degrading, that 
party organizations are detrimental to good gov- 
ernment, and that the only simon-pure patriots 
are those who have severed their party allegiance, 
broken all party ties and affiliations, and have 
beconv» high-toned political freebooters, wearing a 
nondescript uniform, marching with a conglomer- 
ate-tinted banner, and foraging indiscriminately in 
everybody's camp. 

Now if we didn't know Frank Eddy better, it might 
be charitable to ascribe this to shallowness or ignorance; 
but Eddy knows better, and cannot be sincere in thus 
tilting at a scarecrow of his own manufacture. 

The advocate of political anarchy whom he describes 
and then annihilates has absolutely no existence what- 
ever. 

Party allegiance on the part of a citizen is not "unde- 
sirable" or "degrading" in itself, and nobody says that 
it is. When a party deserves allegiance, it is desirable 
that its members should be loyal to it. and they are 
loyal to it. It is only when long tenure of power has 
led to abuses, when the party organization is controlled 
by selfish and corrupt men. using the party pov.er for 
selfish or corrupt purposes, that party members be- 
come "disloyal;" and then they would be something 
less than good citizens, however good party men they 
might be. if they did not refuse to continue their allegi- 

.4, ance. 

Party organizations are not "detrimental to good 
government" in themselves, and nobody ever said they 
were. But corrupt party organizations, party organiza- 
tions which preach pretty platitudes to get votes and 
then betray the voters and the nation or state by using 
the power gained by false pretences to serve Special 
Privilege and despoil tiie people, are "detrimental to 
good government," and do not deserve respect or sup- 
port. 

Men who abandon all parties and flock by themselves, 
when there are parties with honest convictions, honestly 
carried out in public acts, are not held up by anybody as 
"simon-pure patriots." They would be eccentrics, if 
there were any such; and The Herald knows of few 
such individuals. Prostitution of party organizations 
has gone so far that many are suspicious of all parties, 
and own complete allegiance to none; but that is be- 
cause of the failure of the party organizations. 

Mr. Eddy, for some reason of his own, has delib- 
erately misrepresented the attitude of a great mass of 
honest men and patriots who think more of their country 
than they do of any party; who look upon party organ- 
izations as mere means to a great end — their country's 
good — and not as ends in themselves, to be served with- 
out thought of consequences to people or nation; and 
who, when they see that the end of national glory and 
well-being has been subordinated to the end of party 
success and that that party success is giving hospitality 
to a horde of unprincipled thieves in the temple of 
popular liberties, throw uflf the chains of blind partisan- 
ship, refuse to accept the authority of party bosses, and 
seek to serve their country by whatever means are left 
to them. In this class of citizens lies the hope of the 
nation's future; in the class of citizens who accept 
party authority no matter who wields it and for what 
ends it is wielded, who think much of party success and 
little of the national welfare, who shut their eyes to 
the thieves in the temple and seek only the success of 
thir party no matter how corrupt that party is, lies the 
nation's greatest peril. 



in metal ships. But this country had put a tariff on the 
materials going into the making of such .ships, and that 
tariflF has been increased and maintained until it now 
costs from 25 to 50 per cent more to build a ship in 
this country than it does in Europe; this in a country 
which excels the world in every department of steel- 
making. Tliis disadvantage, which this country deliber- 
ately put upon itself, was too much to be overcome. 
The American merchant marine disappeared from the 
seas; and a few years ago, .when Mark Twain saw a 
Duluth whaleback flying the Americn flag in Yokahama. 
it was so remarkable a sight that he devoted a page in 
his book to it. 

This situation cannot be cured by taxing the people 
to make artificial provision for profits in the shipping 
business. With all due respect to President Taft, who 
advocates this remedy, those who propose it are either 
shallow or greedy. As a remedy, it is absolutely worth- 
less. It might be possible, by giving large enough sub- 
sidies, to make shipping profitable. For that matter, it 
would be possible to make the advocates of ship sub- 
sidies happy by giving them this money out of the 
treasury without obliging them to build and sail ships; 
and the benefit to the country and its people would be 
about the same in either case. 

The problem must be approached through the tariff 
and the navigation laws. American ships must be given 
a fair chance, not by artificial stimulation, but by placing 
them upon an equality with the ships of England, for 
instance, wlicre shipbuilding materials are free. Says 
the Springfield Republican: 

Through the tariff the costs of building ships 
in the United States have been raised 25 per cent 
or more above the costs to England. And our 
extreme tariff policy was Intended to have, and In- 
evitably mu.st have, effect in turning national atten- 
tion from the exterior to the Interior trade, and in 
making tins a leas .idvantageous market to buy 
manufactured co nmodities In than the South Amer- 
ican ct.'Untries can find in Etirope. So Brazil sells 
its coffee liere and expends the proceeds in Europe; 
and so Argentina sends its wool past our high-taxed 
markets to the free European market and expends 
the proceeds there. Will the crratlon of steamship 
lines to those southern countries by subsidy suf- 
fice alone to turn the current of their trade? We 
can vote and pay the subsidies, of course. The 
seacoast audience President Taft was addressing 
will favor this policy, and so will many audiences 
on the Atlantic coast. They will get the benefit; 
but the burden without benefit will fall on the In- 
terior section.s of the country, wl^ere piles up the 
bulk of the tariff-subsidy burden, and the Central 
West is becoming alive to the fact. To pile ship 
subsidies on top of high tariff subsidies Is more 
than the West will patiently stand. 



AN INTERESTING INDUSTRY REVIVEri. 

No doubt many had supposed that the good old gold 
brick game had gone out of fashion, but the diverting 
incident reported in The Herald last night from Minne- 
apolis, wherein it was related how a pair of plausible 
rascals charmed $25,000 out of a couple of North Dakota 

citizens by its use, would seem to indicate that it has not 
yet lost its appeal. It can hardly have lost any of its 
power when it works to that extent with a man who has 
business sense enough to accumulate a million or so and 
with another man, his son, who is an assayer. We don't 
remember ever to have heard of its being worked on an 
assayer before, and one feels an irresistible impulse to be 
joyful that the men that worked it did not choose to go 
into the Wall street game of high finance where their 
victims would have been more numerous and their spoils 
more splendid. 



FROM THE WRONG SIDE. 

The present campaign to restore to the American 
merchant marine its lost supremacy upon the world's 
seas approaches the problem from the wrong side, and 
therefore it must fail. It will fail even if it succeeds 
in its present endeavor — which is to get congress to 
provide ship subsidies; because subsidies will not cure 
a disease so deepseated. It is like trying to cure a 
constitutional human ailment by putting salve on the 
sores which are merely its surface evidences. 

The American merchant marine was supreme in the 
days of wooden ships. This country had plenty of tim- 
ber, and it knew how to make good ships, and it had 
good sailors to man them; so the American flag flapped 
in the breezes in every port of the world, and American 
shipping was one of the chief glories of the nation. 

Then came the Civil war and the protective tariflF 
system in its later expansion. When the war was over, 
and this country looked about it, the day of the wooden 
fliip had gone. The world's commerce was being carried 



THE WINNING FIGHT AGAINST TUBERCULOSIS. 

One of the most significant facts about the spreading 
campaign against consumption is the manner in which 
the fraternal and benefit organizations are entering the 
fight in behalf of their members. Several labor unions 
have also joined, and undoubtedly other labor and 
fraternal organizations will soon enlist their sympathies 
and their work with the splendid cause that is grappling 
with one of the greatest wastes that afflict society. 

Nine fraternal and benefit organizations, with a 
membership of nearly 3,000,000, and three international 
labor unions with a membership of more than 100,000, 
have joined the ranks within the last year, according 
to a statement issued today by the National Associa- 
tion for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis. 

•A. year ago only one fraternal organization, the 
Royal League, and only one labor union, the Typograph- 
ical union, maintained institutions for the treatment of 
their tuberculous members. Since Jan. 1, 1909, the fol- 
lowing organizations have taken up the consideration 
of tuberculosis, and in most instances have decided to 
erect institutions: Brotherhood of American Yeomen, 
Order of Eagles, Improved Order of Red Men, Modem 
Woodmen of America, Knights of Pythias, Royal Arcan- 
um, Workmen's Circle, Knights of Columbus, Foresters 
of America, International Photo-Engravers' Union of 
North .'\merica, International Printing Pressmen's and 
x^ssistants' union, and the International Boot and Shoe 
Workers' union. 

The Modern Woodmen and the Knights of Pythias 
have already opened sanatoria for their members at 
Colorado Springs and East Las Vegas, N. M. The 
Workmen's Circle is about to erect a similar insti- 
tution at Liberty, N. Y. The Royal League has main- 
tained a santaorium at Black Mountain, N. C., for three 
years. The other fraternal organizations mentioned 
have cither appointed commissions to consider the ad- 
visability of erecting sanatoria, or are contemplating 
such action. 

The first sanatorium for the benefit of working men 
was built by the Typographical union in connection 
with its home at Colorado Springs, and the pressmen 
have decided to open a similar institution. The photo- 
engravers' union, while not conducting a sanatorium, 
pays for the treatment of its tuberculous members •■«• 
various institutions. The boot and shoe workers' union 
is recommending to its members that they ally them- 
selves with the various organizations united in the fight 
against tuberculosis. 

The work of these organizations does not end here. 
Perhaps more important still are the campaigns of 
education they are 'carrying on, designed to show their 
members how to avoid tuberculosis. In this way more 
than three million men and women are receiving instruc- 
tion through lectures, through official papers, and by 
literature expressly prepared showing the dangers and 
methods of prevention of tuberculosis. This is a cam- 
paign of prevention which will save these organizations 
millions of dollars in sick and death benefits, besides 
benefiting society at large very greatly. The recent 
National Fraternal Congress estimated that half the 
death losses from tuberculosis could be saved by the 
various fraternal organizations of the country. The 
National Association for the Study and Prevention of 
Tuberculosis has rendered much assistance to these or- 
ganizations, and stands ready to co-operate in this 
work as far as possible with any society that is ready 
to take it up. 



THE OEEH COURT. 



(Roadera of Ttie HcraliJ, are lovltert !o make free 
use of thU column ^'^^fOt^ tl>elr IHeitS nboiit live 
tnplca of gnicral InterM^^JBtton tho(il') n:it exceed 
SOO Hords— the shorti-^ li#, ftaer. They laust he writ- 
ten en cue shlc of t l^ruoiuMonly. an<i :hey must be 
tccmipaiiied In every«wS^by Uie name and address 
of the writer. IhoufiU, .tUcsfiw^ieed not lie publUlied. 
A aieiied letter U aNren'-f^a effectlTe hovreier.) 



GATES ON SxMALL CARS. 



To the Editor of The Heralci: 

I notice that th^ street railway com- 
pany has put ntes on some of the 
Hinali cars on TflSe^ West Third street 
and East Fourfit" utreet line.'. I hope 
that .ill of thc^idall cars will be so 
supplied, and I bvlieve the company 
should be encotn-aged in the policy. 

It is a wondei" to me that more peo- 
ple liave not been injured by getting 
on and off cars in Duluth while the cars 
are in motion. It ts a common occur- 
rence for people, to save a few minutes, 
to jump on or off a moving car in the 
middle of the block or at the side of 
tlie intersection nearest to the building 
to which they want to go. It is a fool- 
hardy trick, and the street railway com- 
pany would not be respon.sil le should 
any one bt injured while dolrg so. but 
society should do its part to^vard pre- 
venting "Its unthinking members from 
killing or injuring themselves by just 
such acts. 

Gates on street cars are wise pro- 
visions for preventing people froni 
taking risks which they will take It 
the opportunity is given them. The 
gates on the small cars mav look a 
little odd at first, but they certainly 
make up for an oddncss of ajipearancf* 
in a utility that is a boon to patrons. 
I hope the company will not content it- 
self with thus supplying a few cars, 
lut will extend the sei-vlce to all of its 
cars. Some may grumble, but ii. i^ for 
just that number that gates 8.re neces- 
sary, and the thinking part of the 
public will appreciate the service. 

R. L.. JONES. 

Duluth. Oct. 14. 



"A SUBSCRIBER" REPLIES. 



To the Editor of The Herald 

Some unknown person who signs 
himself "Collegian" in writing to the 
morning paper in reply to my com- 
munication to The Herald last even- 
ing, takes a gratuitous slap at a cul- 
tured gentleman who is a guiist of the 
city, William Norman Guthrie. 

He wastes a quantity of good ink 
and paper In w»iting about tlie ".sub- 
lime egotism" o^«^he lecturer. Perhaps 
Mr. Guthrie displavs some of the man- 
nerisms of the schoolroom or the col- 
lege lecturer, In making his points 
very clear and plain, and people who 
suffer from thig. same "sublime egot- 
ism" may have~tHeir delicate feelings 
ruffled by the assumption that they 
may have difficulty in gra.sping the 
speaker's point.' Long experience In 
lecturing to mixed Glasses cf college 
students may have given Mi. Guthrie 
the habit of makjng himself very clear, 
but the ordinary man is willing to 
overlook this fault, if it is a I'ault. Un- 
less the hearer is himself troubled with 
an aggravated egO. .he is not likely to 
be worried by this habit or attitude of 
mind on the part of tlie lecturer. A lec- 
turer should not be Judged by his man- 
nerisms or his personality. The mat- 
ter he presents, is to my mind, the im- 
portant fact, ami surely nol ody with 
the open mind fcin question the value 
of Mr. Guthrie's lectures. 

It is easy to poke the flngf r of ridi- 
cule at Culture and Art spelled with 
capital letters, and It generally draws 
a laugh from thoughtless people who 
say they have no time for ".such fool- 
ishness." But some people 'here are. 
who realize that good books, and good 
pictures, and good music, and good 
drama, may offer as much real enjoy- 
ment as noveKs, and Sunday supple- 
ments, and George Cohan's melodies, 
and musical comedy. If thev only learn 
to appreciate them. The attitude of 
"Collegian" is that of the man who re- 
fuses to listen to good music because 
"he may not know what gi.od music 
is, but he knows what he likes." If 
there Is any egotism more nearly "sub- 
lime" than thAt. I would like "Col- 
legian" to show ft to me. 

A SUBSCRIBER. 

Duluth, Oct. tS. 

A BRITISH RE\'OLUTION. 



New York VVorld: In .his speech on 
the budget at Birmingham last month. 
Prime itinister Asquith declared: 
"Amendment by the house of lords is 
out of the question. Rejection by the 
house of lords is equally out of the 
question. • • • xhat way revolu- 
tion lies." 

Replymg a week later to the prime 
minister irom the same platform, Mr. 
Baltour derided "those who fill tlieir 
speeches with constitutional intiquari- 
ani.sm on the subject of the house of 
lords, or, it they he of a different tem- 
perament, l!ll thefr speeclies with the 
bluster of the political bully." 

Replying now to JTr. Balfour at New- 
castle. Mr. Lloyd-ki^orge, the chancellor 
of the excliequer;^ plainly states: "We 
are going to serid that bill up to the 
house of lords and get all tiiu taxes or 
none. • ♦ • Tiie lords may decree 
a revolution, but tlie people will direct 
it if it is begun, and issues will be 
raised that are n6\v little dreamed of, 
Uie answers to which will be charged 
with peril for tne order of things 
wliich the peers x'epresent." 

There need no longer be any doubt 
that In spite of the king's efforts at 
mediation, the L>iberals are determined 
to tolerate no Ititerference with the 
money bills by the lords. Tlit' rejection 
of the budget will bo the signal for a 
revolutionary campaign agiinst the 
house of lords. 

John E. Redmond, the Irish leader, 
has just shown that the full i)Ower of 
tlie Nationalists and their organiza- 
tion will be used in. helping the Lib- 
erals to deprive th« house of lords of 
tlie veto power, fheir amendments to 
the Irish land purcrliase act, "ast week, 
insures the alliance of Nationalists 
with the Liberals. 

It is a fight from which the Liberals 
can no longer siiirk if the lords chal- 
lenge them on the budget. For four 
years tiiey have been thwarted in their 
principal policies by a liereditary 
chamber uf Tories. They should wel- 
come the opportunity to settle the 
issue, for upon the outcome depends 
the future fruitfulness of Liberalism. 



It would be interesting if it should turn out, as it may, 
that Francisco Ferrer, dead as a martyr to the cause of 
liberty and enlightenment, should prove a mightier 
power to shake the foundations of tyranny in Spain than 
Ferrer living. 






m- 



f^iy^^:*>' : 



Hot blscnlfy hot breads, 
cake — ^the tliiestyinost taste- 
ful and healflifiil— made ivith 
Royal, Impossible without It. 

ROYIU. 

BAKING 
POWDER 

Absolutely Pure 



THE ONLY Baking Powder 
made from Royal Grape 
Cream <A Tartar 



THE WEATHER. 



W-r^ 




and 



p— 1 Cloudy weather is 

CLrOVDY what the weather 

' ^ forecaster holds out 

for Duluthians dur- 
ing the next twenty- 
four hours. Clouds, 
dark clouds, have 
been pretty much 
in evidence for tlie 
past few days and 
last night, some of 
tliem leaked a lit- 
tle. A slight leak 
i — :\^_^ — i. -.....-i occurred this morn- 
ing, the result being a cross between 
rain and snow, the odds favoring rain. 
Not much change in temperature is ex- 
pected. 

A year ago today it was fair 
warm. 

Sunrise time this morning was 6:26 
and setting time is indicated at 5:21 
p. m. 

Mr. Richardson says of weather con- 
ditions: 

"The lake region storm has advanced 
Its center to the St. Lawrence valley. 
During the past twenty-four hours 
snow Hurries fell over Manitoba, West- 
ern Ontario and Lake Superior, and 
rain over Atlantic and Southwestern 
states as a result of this disturbance. 
Tiie barometer is high in the far North- 
west, attended by freezing temperature 
in North Dakota. Montana and West- 
ern Canada. Clear skies are the rule 
in Western and Southern states. The 
easterly movement of the St. Law- 
rence valley low pressure and the 
British Columbia high pressure areas 
will cause generally fair weather at 
the Head of the Lakes tonight and Sat- 
urday." 



IdentifyiUK Herself, 

Galveston News: "I'm ver;,' sorry to 
trouble you, madam," said the bank 
teller politely, "but you'll have to be 
identified." He pushed tie check 
across the marble slab toward her as 
lie sDoke. 

"Identified?" repeated the lady; 
"wliat does that mean'/ Isn't the check 
good?" 

The bank man did not smile, for this 
was the thirty-seventh lady wlio had 
asked this question that day. 

"J have no doubt it Is," he said, "but 
I don't know you. Do you know any- 
body in the bank?" 

"Why, I'm Mrs. Weatherley!" ex- 
claimed the lady. "Didn't you see my 
name on the check? See — here It is." 
The teller shook his head wearily. 

"iou must be identified," he insisted. 
■'You niust bring somebody who knows 
you. " The lady drew herself up. 

"riiat check," she said with dignity, 
"was given me by my husband. There's 
his name on it. Do you know him?" 

"I do," said the teller, "bat I don't 
know iou." 

"Then," said the lady, "I'll show you 
who I am. My husband is a. tall man 
with reddish hair. His face is smooth 
shaven. He has .a" mole on one cheek 
and looks somfething like a gorilla, 
some people say, but I don't think so. 
vVlien he talks he twists Iiis mouth to 
one side, and one. of his front teeth is 
missing. He weq.rs a No. ir» collar, a 
No. 6 shoe, aiid won't keep his coat 
buttoned. He's tlie hardest man to get 
money out of you ever saw— it took me 
three days to get thi« check." 

The banker waved his han<i. 

"I guess it's all right," he said; "put 
your name right there — no, on the 
back, not the face." 

Proof. 

Puck: Teacher— r-Your little brother 
was all right when, he left the house 
with you, and yet you say he s sick and 
won't be in .school? 

The Kid — Sure! .Didn't I give him 
the seegar wid ma. own hands? 



Following are the minimum and 
maximum temperatures for the past 
twenty-four hours: 

Mln. Mav. Min. Max. 

Abilene 58 00 Memptils ."iO 78 

Ashevllle 42 61 .Miles City 28 62 

C2 1 JIllvv.iukeo 34 

48 I MlniieJusa 26 

60 jModeiia 34 

52 .Vloiitgomery 60 

56 ! .Moorlieail 28 

5t> I New Orleans 70 



...34 



AUanta 
Ulsiuaivk . 
Boston . . . 

Huffalo 38 

Cairo 44 

Calgary 22 

Charlestoa 66 

Chicago 34 

ClncJimaU 40 

Coiic-orJla 44 

Daveiipurt 34 

Denver .....; 40 

l»etr)it 3X 

Devllg Lake 20 

IHjUge 44 

DULUTH 32 

Kilniontoii 30 

El i'aso 48 

Kscauaba 32 

Oalvcstoii 72 

Uranii Haveu ....42 

Green Bay 32 

Havre 28 

Helena 36 

Houghton 36 

Huron 36 

JacksuuTllIe g6 

KamluoDs 32 

Kansas City 44 

Knoxvllle 46 

La Cro!i.<e 36 



74 


New York 


..50 


52 


Norf)lk 


..52 


56 


North field 


..40 


70 


North Platte 


..32 


52 


Oklahoma 


..48 




Omaha 


■<8 


46 


Phoeiils 


54 


.•ifi 


Pierre 


..40 


76 


PltUburg 


..38 


42 


Port Arthur 


..'28 


54 


PortUnd. Or 


..48 


56 


Prince Albert 


..36 


44 


Qu'Appelle 


..30 



Lander 

Little Uock .. 
Los ."Vtigeles . . 
Marquette . . . 
Medleiue Hat 



..32 
..38 
..56 
..34 
..24 



80 
44 
42 
62 
64 
40 
52 
80 
60 
62 
62 
40 
74 
84 
72 
42 
54 



Rapid City 34 

.St. liouls 40 

.St. Paul 36 

San Antonio 62 

San Francisco 50 

Santa Fe 40 

Sault Ste. Marie ,32 

Shreveport 62 

•Spnkaue 34 

.Swift Current 28 

>^'ashington 46 

Wlclilta 46 

WUUaton 28 

Wliinemuoca 34 

Winnipeg 32 

YelUnrstone 34 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Kerali of This Date, 1 38?. 



•♦•Work on W. W. Spalding's ele- 
gant house on Second street and Fifth 
avenue west is well along and the in- 
side finish is now being put on. The 
house will l)e ready for occupancy by 
December. It will cost $15,000. 



•**Two vessels of the McDougall 
type will be built at the Uice's point 
yard this winter. They will be z84\4 
feet long over all, 36 feet beam and 22 
feet deep. The 103 was launched today 
and will be consort to the steamship 
Sitka. 



"dead." As Is customary in China, a 
banquet will be offered to the dead 
and pathetic speeches delivered. 

♦♦•Everything is now ready for busi- 
ness on the West Duluth incline rail- 
way. A trial trip was made with a 
freiglit car and everytliing worked like 
a cliarm. Passenger cars will be run- 
ning in about two weeks. 



••♦Commander Heyerman has been 
assigned the position of inspector of 
the Eleventh lighthouse district, which 
includes Duluth. 



•••Judge Neff has returned to West 
Duluth from Barnum. where he is 
erecting a large public school build- 
ing. 



•••Sin Get, a Duluth Chinaman, is 
dead. He was poor and his country- 
men will bury him, probably with 
Clirlstian rites. According to the China- 
men, Sin Get "has saluted the age," 
for they never speak of a person as 



1904--ECHOES OF HARMONY--1910 



•••Mr. Collins of the Southwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance association, of 
Marshalltown, Iowa, is in the city try- 
ing to organize a local board of that 
society. 



Madison Independent Press: Har- 
mony! Some rash person has had the 
temerity to suggest that harmony has 
been restored to the llepublican party 

of this state. There is more peace in 
Hades than there Is among the leading 
Jtepublicans of this state. The 
trouble is the G. O. P. bovine hasn't 
teats enough to succor the suckers 
who are fastened upon the party. 



Park Rapids Clipper: We expect 
soon to see a number of late "inde- 
pendent" rtepublicans begiii to talk 
party loyalty again. 



Department of Agriculture, Weather 
Bureau, Duluth, Oct. 15. — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Saturday: Duluth, Superior and vicin- 
ity, including the Mesaba and Vermil- 
ion iron ranges — Partly cloudy weather 
tonight and Saturday; nol much change 
in temperature; moderate westerly 
winds. H. W. RICHARDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



Chicago. Oct. 15. — Forecasts for twen- 
ty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. Satur- 
day: 

Upper Michigan— Snow flurries to- 
night and Saturday; continued cool. 

Wisconsin — Generally fair tonight 
and Saturday; slightly cooler in north- 
west portion tonight. 

Minnesota — Generally fair tonight 
and Saturday; slightly cooler in south- 
east portion tonight. 

Iowa — Fair tonight and Saturday; 
continued cool. 

North Dakota — Fair tonight and Sat- 
urday. 

South Dakota — Fair tonight and Sat- 
urday; slightly cooler tonight. 

Montana — Fair tonight and Saturday; 
slightly cooler in southwest portion 
tonight. 

"AS FIRMLY PLEDGED." 



New York Sun: From a review of 
the results of the first half of the cam- 
paign tour of the United States on 
which President Taft is now engaged, 
this Jllurainating paragraph is taken: 

"The president has acknowledged 
that he accepted a tariff bill that fell 
short in some of its details of the pledges 
of the party. He did this, as he has 
said, for the sake of party solidarity. 
He did it to save the rest of his pro- 
gram of legislation, to which, in his 
opinion, he and tlie Republican party 
are as firmly pledged as they were to 
the downward revision of the tariff." 

The innocent bystander will recall 
the perfervid declarations made by 
numerous members of Mr. Taft's party 
to the effect that the Republican party 
was never for an instant pledged to 
"downward revision" of the tariff. He 
will search the present tariff law in 
vain for any evidence that the customs 
schedules have been generally lowered. 
And then iie will wonder what the out- 
come of future recommendations of 
tlie president will be if he, in days of 
come, accepts on other subjects stat- 
utes as little to his liking and as for- 
eign to his pledges as is the tariff bill 
he approved "for the sake of party 
solidarity." 

» 
Pointed Parasrnpbii. 

Chicago News: If people distrust 
you, pause a moment and ask yourself 
who is to blame. 

If voii want yoiu' wife to do a thing, 
just iell her that you won't permit it. 

Honestly, don't you believe that all 
people who disagree with you are 
wrong? 

Women who don't believe what they 
hear about others are fond of repeat- 
ing it. 

•Even if a woman doesn't get the right 
kind of husband, she thinks it better 
than being left. 

Doesn't it sound silly when you hear 
people talking in a language that you 
do not understand? 

Think three times before you speak, 
and thus give the other fellow a chance 
to make a fool of himself. 

When a girl is interested in a man. 
she tries to stir him up by telling him 
about other men who are interested in 
her. 



•••.\rchitects are busy as they well 
can be and they are figuring on next 
year to be the best building season 
Duluth ever had. 



A MOMENT WITH THE WITS. 



News: "Time is 
remarked the mor- 



Chicago Daily 
money, you know, 
alizer. 

"But I don't know anything of the 
kind." rejoined the demoralizer. 
"There's young Bilkins, who lias plenty 
of time on his hands and not a cent in 
his pockets." 



Puck: Noble Bridegroom ^trium- 
piiant in his fortune-hunting) — Wis ali 
thy vorldly goodts I me endow. 



Minnesota Mascot: Harold Knutson. 
editor of the Foley Independent, is a 
pretty hard hitter and the following 
from his l«?n in the last issue of the 
Independent lias a ring to it that 
sounds good to us poor cusses who 
have been fighting 'er straight during 
the last three campaigns: 

"It would simplify matters consid- 
erably if the aspirants for the Repub- 
lican gubernatorial nomination, who 
have not loyally supported the ticket 
in tlie past three campaigns, would 
peacefully betake tiiemselves to the 
regions of oblivion and thereby restore 
liarmony in the party ranks. The In- 
dependent, while Republican, will not 
under any circumstances, support any 
gentleiTian wliom it knows has been 
unloyal or lukewarm in any of the 
three campaigns, as we believe there 
are several who would receive consid- 
erable benefit from a generous dose of 
their own medicine. It would be 
equally consistant to place a bust of 
the late Benedict Arnold in the hall of 
fame as It would be to choose one of 
these gentlemen to carry the standard 
next year." 

St. Peter Free Press: Both Collins 
and Dunn can afford to keep in the 
background and the Republican party 
certainly is in need of rest from 
furtlier entanglements. It would be a 
great mistake to assume that the 
Democratic party in this state is now 
a negative proposition. On the con- 
trary it has several men in its ranks 
of sufficient standing with the people 
to make it exceedingly interesting for 
the other side, should the latter be 
foolish enough to reopen the old 
factioned -strife. In a measure it will 
depend upon Governor Eberhart how 
this shall be effected. If he steers 
clear of the infiuence that brought 
disaster to the party six years ago he 
may succeed himself at the next elec- 
tion, otherwise it will be some other 
Republican, or it may be a Democrat. 

Ortonville Herald Star: The new 
kitchen cabinet is said to number 
Dar Reese and Edward Smith among 
its leading members. This is probably 
a mistake as these boys are always 
found in the pantry. 

Cannon Falls Beacon: Governor 
Eberhart is under no obligations to the 
Democratic party; neither should he be 
bound to retain any member of the 
"kitchen cabinet" who has lent his 
efforts to the building up of the 
Democratic machine and the disorgan- 
ization of the Republican forces. — 
Mankata Free Press. 

The Beacon agrees entirely with the 
Free Press in that Governor Eber- 
hart is under no obligation to retain 
Democrats in office; but it is unfair to 
blame the Democrats with the disor- 
ganization of the Republican party. A 
half dozen Republican self appointed 
dictators were responsible for all the 
trouble we have had during the past 
five years; and it looks as though 
some of them were getting ready to 
make more trouble. 

Sauk Center Herald: Events since 
the death of John A. Johnson Indicate 
that there are three big factions in 
Minnesota Republicanism, namely, the 
Ramsey county — Dar Reese faction, 
the Edward Smith — Hennepin county 
faction, and the Bob Dunn faction, 
with Eberhart trying to play a lone 
liand against them all. while Billy 
Hamm quietly smiles and gets ready 
to tie up to the one that's best able 
to "deliver the goods." No wonder 
Frank Day and Dick O'Connor lie low 
and laugh in their sleeves. 

Northfleld News: It is enough to 
bring the blush of shame to the cheek 
of every honest Republican when it is 
seriously proposed to permit the polit- 
ical procurers of the Twin Cities, who 
pander to the lust of corporations, to 
dictate the policy of the Grand Old 
Party, organize Its forces, write its 
platform and select its nominees. 
■ ■ 

philanthropy. 

Chicago Daily Socialist: Here -s the 
story of a small boy, a mother and a 
barrel of apples, and a moral which 
does not have to be told in words: 

The windows of an orphan asylum 
overlooked the bapk yard of the house 
where the boy, the barrel of apples and 
the boy's mother lived. Now, the apples 
that weie in the barrel disappeared at 
a famous rate, and the mother, being 
a knowing woman as a matter of 
course, made inquiry of her son. Yes, 
he had eaten the apples; but. "mam- 
ma." he said. "I have to; the orphans 
want so many cores." 



Detroit Free Press: "She asked me 
what 'Igloo' meant." 

"Well?" 

"And I couldn't tell her. I'm not up 
on baby talk." 



Philadelphia Record: Nell — I tell 
you. she is on to the latest wrinkle. 

Belle — She ouglit to be; she's a com- 
plexion specialist. 



Punch: Servant (who has been sent 
to chastise a stray cat for stalking 
chickens) — I couldn't — catch 'iin — mum 
— for the nearer I — got to 'im — the fur- 
ther 'e got ^way. 

"^l. 

Louisville Courier-Journal: "What 
will we do if food keeps getting high- 
er?" 

"Resort to condemnation proceed- 
ings, 1 s'pose." 



Washington Star: "Why is there so 
much discontent in the midst of plen- 
ty?" asked the demagogue. 

"I don't know," answered the sub- 
stantial citizen, "unless it's because a 
lot of people would rather stand 
around, the same as you've been doing, 
and talk about their troubles instead 
of going to work." 



Baltimore American: "Don'c you find 
Judge Blank tiresome as a speaker?" 

"No. indeed. What makes you think 
he is so?" 

"Because he is such a severe judge." 

"What has that got to do with him 
as a speaker?" 

"Well, it makes him inclined to long 
sentences." 



Life: Mr.s. Post — Do you think you'll 
smoke when you're older, .lohnnie? 
They say it makes one awfully sick at 
first. 

Johnnie (aged 10) — I don't expect 
any further bother over it. moUier. It 
wasn't the sliglitest effort for me to 
'.earn to swear. 



Aftrr Oliver. 

Afy sense of sight is very keen. 

My sense of hearing weak. 
One time 1 saw a mountain pass. 

But could not iiear its peak. 

— Oliver Herford. 

Why. Ollie. that you failed In this 

Is not so very queer. 
To hear Its peak you should, you know. 

Have had a mountaineer. 

Boston Transcript. 

But if I saw a mountain pass. 

My eye I'd never drop; 
I'd keep it turned upon the height. 

And see the mountains top. 

— Philadelphia Public Ledger. 

I didn't see the mountain pass. 

Nor hear its speak, by George! 
But when it comes to storing stuff, 

I saw the mountain gorge! 

— Exchange. 

The mountain, peaked at this. 

Frowned dark while Ollie guyed; 
A cloud c'erspread its lofty brow. 

And then the mountain side. 

— Boston Trascrlpt. 



RefiootiouM vf a Bachelor. 

New York Press: Preceptors teach 
long before they learn. 

Money makes a man wish he had the 
brains to make it. 

A girl keeps in practice for loving by 
never stopping flirting. 

The reason the average man's brain 
never gets lame the way his arms and 
legs do Is he hardly ever uses it. 

When a man really knows how to 
manage a woman, it's a sign he has too 
much sense ever to try. 
» 
Tfa« Idiotd. 

Harper's Weekly: "Just think of It — 
a full table d'hote dinner for 30 cents: 
oysters, soup, fish, roast duck, salad, 
ice cream, fruit, demi-tasse!" 

"Where? ! ! !" 

"1 don't know — but just think of it!** 



AMUSEMENTS. 



LIU cum I TONIGHT. 



Qm. M. Coiiaa't OmtMt «« All Mutieal Tri«aipti( 

45 MINUTES 
FROM BROADWAY 

—50 PEOPLE— 
"A Whirlwlad of Girt*. Mutlc Fop wU SMt*." 



Week Cemm«aciR( Sunday. 0«t. 17. MatiiiM 
Oaiiy^Slgnor Lutgi D'URBANO ant! Hit Faaioua 

Band. Scats «n Sale. Matiiiee — Children, I5c; 
Adultt. 2Sc: Ni«ht*. 2Sc to Sftc. 




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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



IS 



< I < »i— 




NOBBY FALL TROUSERS 
$2.00_to_$8.00 

Store Open Saturday Night Till 10:30. 



WILLIAMSON 91, MENDENI-IALL. 



Mr. f. 




FALL AND 
WINTER 

SUITS 

$ 1 0.00 

TO 

$35.00 




FALL AND 
WINTER 



OVERCOATS 



$10.00 

TO 

$40.00 




NATIONAL 
WISH TREE 



An Old Chestnut Tree Is 

Supposed to Possess 

Unusual Powers. 

Is Scion of the Famous 

Wishing Tree of Hyde 

Park. 




The Big Duluth Has the Suit or Overcoat You Want at the Price You Want to Pay. 




Cold Weather 
Furnishings 

So easy to "drop in" to our Furnishings de- 
partment and find just what you want. 

2-picce Underwear 50^ to $7.50 

Union Suits at $l-00 to $5.00 

Bradley Coat Sweaters $1.00 to $6.00 

Silk-lined Kid and Mocha Gloves $1 to $3.75 
Snappy styles in Pajamas, suit. ..$1 to $2.50 
Outing Flannel Night Shirts. .. .50^ to $1.30 
Wool Gloves Heavy Gloves and Mit- 
tens at 23^ to $1.50 

Negligee Shirts, Neckwear, Nobby Jewelry, 
Suit Cases and Bags. 



The Real Economy 
of Clothing the Boy 

Is the lesson this great boys' store has been teach- 
mg Duluth mothers for years, and you'll find it 
true economy buying your boys' clothing here. 

Young Men's Overcoats $4.95 to $35 

Boys' Overcoats $3.95 to $18 

Boys' Reefers $2.45 to $10 

Auto Collar Overcoats $6.45 to $15 

Young Men's Suits $4.95 to $35 

Boys' Suits $2.45 to $15 

Children's Russian Suits $2,45 to $10 

Boys' Mackinaw Suits, just the thing for 

school and outdoor play $5.45 

Boys' Mackinaw Coats $3.45 



't^r^K^ 




* , 



RESTORES LAND 
ONCE WITHDRAWN 

Interior Department Reopens 

173,440 Acres Held for 

Reclamation Work. 

Washington. Oct. 15. — The interior 
department has restored. subject to 
eettlement and entry next February, 
173 440 acres of public land which 
formerlv was withdrawn for certain 
reclania'tion projects in Washington, 
California and Arizona. The lands af- 
fected are. 158.400 acres in tl»e 
Phoenix Ariz., district; 9.440 acres in 
the Los Angeles, Cal.. district; and 
B.600 acres in tlie AValla \\ alia, Wash., 
district. 

WILL TIE CANS TO 

ALL BOOZING COPS. 

Chicago Oct. 15.— Short shrift will 
be given hereafter to any Chicago po- 
liceman who drinks" intoxicants while 



on duty or who is seen under the In- 
tluence af liquor. This ultimatum, 
voiced bv Chief Steward in the words, 
"Its a case of every man on the water 
wagon and exit the booze flgliters. I 
liave no time for drunkards," came in 
a general order directing members of 
tlie police force to become abstainers 
under penalty of losing their positions 
As an earnest that the new chief 
meant what he said, six policemen 
found guiltv of intoxication were 
dropped from the rolls when the order 
to quit drinking w as issued. 

OHIO'S LABOR 
CHARTER REVOKED 

Seceding Organization Is Rec- 

cognized— Appeal to Go 

to Toronto. 

Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 15. — As a result of 
the split in the Ohio Federation of 
Labor over the seating of delegates 
under the ban of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, the charter of the 



original federation has been revoked 
and the bolting faction was recognized 
by a telephone message to National 
Organized Grant Hamilion from Frank 
Morrison, general secretary of the na- 
tional council. 

The old organization adopted a 
resolution to appeal to the convention 
of the American I'ederation of labor at 
Toronto next month. , , , 

The bolters elected as president John 
A Voll of Zanesville, international 
vice president of the glass bottle blow- 
ers. ^ 

DISCUSS THE ORIENT. 

Foreign Religious Work Discussed 
at Minneapolis Meeting. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Oct. 15.— Chinese 
and Japanese missions were the chief 
topic of address on the second day of 
the one hundredth convention of the 
American board of commissioners of 
foreign missions, yesterday morning 
at the Plymouth Congregational church 

litre* 

"China— Awakening— To What?" was 
the general subject discussed by mis- 
sionaries returned from that field. 

The missionaries to the Japanese 
who addressed the convention were 
Rev Henry J. Bennett, Rev. Dr. J. H. 
Pettee and Rev. Dr. Otis Cary. 

Rev. R. F. Black of Davao. mission- 
ary to the Philippine islands, gave an 
address on "Conditions Among the 



Philippine Natives." "India — The Dark 
and the Light in Struggle" was the 
topic of addresses by William Hazen. 
Miss Anna L. Millard and Jlev. A. H. 
Clark of the Maratlii mission. Rev. J. 
li. Dickson spoke on the Ceylon mis- 
sions, told of the work, conditions and 
needs of their field. 

Last night a grfat union meeting of 
the American boar4 and the Congre- 
gational brotherhood wsis held at the 
.Auditorium. 

URGES AGITATIOnToR 

MERCHANT MARINE. 



YOUR 



New York, Oct. 15. — The special com- 
mittee appointed by the chamber of 
commerce to inquire irto the causes of 
the decline in American shipping en- 
gaged in International commerce has 
reported favoring goneral agitation 
among commercial bodies throughout 
tlie country in behalf of a govern- 
mental policy that wculd bring about 
a revival of the merchant marine of the 
United St ates. 

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 

MEET NEXT IN TOPEKA. 



Pittsburg. Pa., Oct. 15.— Topeka, 
Kan., was chosen by Ihe delegates at- 
tending the annual convention of the 
Disciples of Christ (Christian church) 
as the place where' the 1910 convention 
will be held. Des Moines, Iowa, and 
Boston made a strong fight for the 

Mrs'. Decima Camptell Barclay, the 
only surviving daughter of Alexander 
Campbell, founder of the Disciples ot 
Christ church, who Is 69 years old, ar- 
rived here vesterday to attend the 
meeting.". Mrs. Barclay lives in the old 
Campbell homestead at Bethany, W. 
Va. 



Get Ready For The New Season 



A BRAND new outfit awaits you at this big 
Credit Store. Every style, every quality, 
every garment is the best that can be had— and 
our guarantee insures you against all risk. 

You can't save anything by paying cash. You 
can't get better styles or qualities by paying cash. 
Why, then, should you inconvenience yourself? 

Our $1.00 a week plan does it all. It clothes 
you in fine garments and makes the paying part 
so easy that you never miss the money. 



ho 



Gu aranteed Clothing for 
Men , Women and Children 

Complete Outfits, $12 to $30 



ASKIN SMARlNiM 



28 and 30 E. Superior Street 



2nd Floor, over 
Public Market 



Store open Monday and Saturday 
Evenin^ifS till 10 o'clock 



Orrinc Docs Cure 

DRUNKENNESS 

This is a positive fact known to tens 
of thousands of wives, and^rnothers of 
this land. Thew know Orrine is a 
reliable remedy for the cure of drun- 
kenness, because it has restored their 
loved ones to lives of sobriety and 
usefulness. Every one of these women 
bouglit Orrine with full confidence that 
it would effect a cure or their money 
would be refunded to them if it failed. 
This guarantee is in each box. -No 
other remedy for the .nire of drunken- 
ness is sold with this liberal guaran- 
tee but Orrine has been so unilormly 
successful that tlie makers want the 
buyers to know that they have full 
protection if it should fail in any in- 
stance. We never iniblish letters of 
patients but recently this letter came 
to us from Dr. Nolt-?, 8th and Race 
Sts., Phoiladclphla. Pa. Read it and 
you will readily api>reciate why Orrine 
is so well thought cf: 

"I have had a remarkable case of 
inebriacv under my personal observa- 
tion. The patient drank heavily tor 
fifteen years and reached a degraded 
condition, which caused tiie breaking 
up of his family and separation from 
his wife. Every hope was given up for 
ever saving the man from his strong 
desire for drink, and only a mother s 
interest finally persuaded him to vol- 
untarily take treatment for his dis- 
eased condition. It was my pleasure 
to recommend Orrine, your liquor habit 
cure and the treatment was taken 
faithfully. This was two years ag'o 
and the patient is now in a healths 
condition and still aostains from the 
use of stimulants. I have sold Orrine 
for a number of years and have al- 
wavs found It to be satisfactory. I 
believe you have an exceptionally good 
treatment for this disease.' 

Orrine is prepared in two forms. No 
1 a powder, absolut<?ly tasteless and 
odorless, given secr^etly In food or 
drink. Orrine No. 2, in piH form, is 
for those who wish to cure themselves. 
Orrine costs only $1 a box The guar- 
antee is in each box. Write for Free 
Orrine Booklet (mailtd In plain sealed 
envelope) to Orrine Co., 457 Orrine 
Building. Washington, D. C pr'"^"^ 
is for sale in this city by ^. A. Ab- 
bott, 129 West Superior .street: 932 
East Second street, and 101 West 
Fourth street. ,. ,, , 

He knows Orrine is a reliable and 
efficacious remedy for drunkenness and 
he will not offer you a substitute. 



Washington, Oct. 15. — Have you ever 
sat under the benign shade of Wash- 
ington's wishing tree? 

It has been one of the unique at- 
tractions of Lafayette park, for, lo, 
these many years. It is not described 
in the official guide books, but it is 
there just the same, and has been ever 
since the sQuare was laid out — in the 
'40s. The tree itself is a dwarf chest- 
nut, although it has grown out of it.^ 
dwarfness to a great extent. It is the 
scion of the tamous wishing tree in 
Hyde park, London. It is located im- 
mediately west of the Jackson statue 
about twenty-five feet, and is in full 
sight of all the windows on the north 
side of the White House. 

The wishing tree, as its name indi- 
cates, possesses rare powers, or at 
least it is supposed to, in that every 
wish that is made under its branches 
come true some time or other. Gen- 
erally it is other, but that does not 
.seriously Interfere with the reputa- 
tion of the tree. 

"There is no particular form of wish- 
ing," said an ••oldest Inhabitant" re- 
cently in discussing the tree, "though 
the park attendant told me many year.^ 
ago that most of the wishers went up 
close enough to the tree to put their 
liands upon its lower limbs. The wl.-h 
must not be spoken, and must not be 
divulged. 

"About forty years ago I was di- 
rected by the editor of the Daily 
Clironicle of Washington, on which 
paper I was then a young reporter, to 
explode the stories about the tree; t;> 
show that they were the rankest kind 
of superstition, &nd that wishes under 
an iron lamp pose or anywhere else 
were just as likely to come true. 

•'I proceeded to do the exploding, 
and was perfectly satisfied that there 
was a perfect explosion. And so was 
the editor. Col. Robert Ingersoll, wi.o 
for many years lived in a house whicii 
faced the wishing tree. He became 
interested in it, and In his many lec- 
tures on •Superstition' he did a great 
deal more exploding. 

Many Koyal VlHKorH. 
"My first personal experience with 
the tree was when James Buchanan 
was president. The prince of Wales — 
the king of England now — was the 
roval visitor. Miss Harriet Lane, a 
niece of the president, walked through 
the park with tlie prince one evening, 
on their way to the residence of Lord 
Lvnn, then the English minister at 
Washington, only a couple of blocks 
distant from the White House. 

"On their way they passed under 
the wisrhing tree, and Miss Lane told 
the prince its story, and that it was 
of Hyde park and English stock. He 
became enthusiastic and. on her chal- 
lenge, went under the tree, grasped 
one of its branches firmly and devout- 
ly made a wish. 

I have seen other royal visitors un- 
der the tree, notably the Grand Duke 
Alejiis of Russia, who recently passed 
away; King Kalakaua of the Sandwich 
islands during Gen. Grant's admin- 
i.«^tration. and during the Cleveland ad- 
ministration Queen Emsons of almost 
equal rank in tlie royal way. 

Lincolu I'sfd Leaves for Tea. 
"This tree is also known to somt> 
of the habitues of the park as the 
nurses' tree, for the nurses gather 
around it in preference to any of the 
other trees. Tea made of its leaves 
cures many disorders, and is said to be 
especially useful in warding off at- 
tacks of whooping cougn. 

'•I have been told that Abraham Lin- 
coln, when president of the United 
States, went personally to the tree one 
night for some of its leaves, with 
which to make a draught for his third 
son, William Wallace Lincoln, the lit- 
tle fellow who died in the White House 
only a short time prior to tlie assassi- 
nation of the president. 

'•In those days there was a high iroii 
rail fence around the park, the pattern 
of the present fence around the Wiiite 
House. The -iates being locked and ni 
one knowing where the keys w^ere 
kept, Mr. Lincoln personally helpej 
his coachman as he climbed the fence 
to get the leaves. 

••This tree figured in another way in 
President Lincoln'.? life, for it was evi- 
dence durir.g the assassination trial 
that Atzerodt, Payne and Dave Har- 
rold spent most of the afternoon pre- 
ceding the tragedy in the seat under 
the tree. From this seat the best view- 
is obtained of what is taking place on 
the outside of the White House. 

"Singularly enough, it was in evi- 
dence during the trial of that crazy 
vagabond, Charles J. Guiteau, as also 
in his confessions and admissions, that 
he, too, had spent a great deal of his 
time during the five days that he de- 
clared he was under an inspiration to 
ki'i President Jarfielu in that identical 
seat. He used the scat, he said as 
others had. for the same rc^ason that 
actuated the Lincoln conspirators: it 
afforded the best view of the White 
Ilouse. He also said that he liad 
found that particular seat more restful 
tlian anv other seat in the park, and 
iliat it was while he was sitting in it 
that he received the incentive to com- 
mit ills terrible crime." 




America's Greatest Clothing S pecialists. 
OVARANTBED PViti: WOOLr 

SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 






Don't buy your Fall clothes until you have seen these wonder- 
ful suits and overcoats. We have just received 300 suits and over- 
coats from our New York headquarters, and we want you to come 
here tomorrow and let us show you that you are losing money if 
you don't buy your clothes at the 3 Winners. The High Rent 
stores ask $22.50, and in many instances $25, for goods like these, 
and we guarantee you that every garment is 100 per cent pure wool 
and strictly hand tailored throughout. No matter what color or 
material you have in mind we can please you, and wre guarantee to 
fit you perfectly with the understanding that we will refund the 
money if everything is not entirely satisfactory and just as repre- 
sented. Come tomorrow and let us prove these facts to you. 




CLOTHING GOIHPANYy Inc., 

115 East Superior Street^ 

Betv«reen First and Second Avenues East. 




liver an address, the subject of which 
will be announced later. 

JEWS EXCEL 'l\ learning. 

Russian Government Now Sees a 
Menace to the Nation. 

St. Petersburg, Oct. 15. — The re- 
opening of the academic year has 
brought forward the vextd question of 
the proportion of Jews admissable to 
universities and high schools in Rus- 
sia. 

Taking the relative numbers of the 
Hebrew aand Gentile inhabitants of 
the empire as a basis, the government 
long ago fi.xed a ratio of 3 per cent 
for the former. By nature more am- 
bitious, and by predilection of circum- 
stances cliiefiy town dwellers, the 
Jews insistently besieged the abodes 
of learning, and continual lapses from 
the above rule were made and toler- 
ated. ,. , , 

University diplomas, medical degrees, 
and more especially graduation from 
the various technical colleges enabled 
the Jews to obtain coveted posts and 
to evade the restrictions upon resi- 
dence outside tlie pale. A paternal 
government, rightly or wrongly, re- 
awoke to tiie fact that therein lay a 
menace to the Russian nation. 

changeIn the zeppellns. 

Most Important Will Be Third 
Motor of High Horse Power. 

Berlin. Oct. 15. — As a result of the 
liberal experience of the past summer 
a number of changes are to be intro- 
duced into future airships of the Zep- 
pelin type. The most important of 
these will be tiie provision of a third 
motor, bringing up the total horse- 



power from 230 to 315. To carry the 
additional weight a corresponding In- 
crease of gas capacity is necessary. 
Wliile the 13,000 cubic meters of Zep- 
pelin I. was raised to 3 5,000 in its two 
successors, this latter figure will be 
further augmented to 20,000 in the 
next vessel of flie tjpe. 

Tlie experiments with wireless tele- 
graphy which have already been made 
from Zeppelin III. are to be continued 
in a most syf^teniatic manner. 

A well kn.>wn German writer and 
sportsman, Herr Karl Vollmoeller, 
publishes in the October issue of the 
.Suddeutsche Monatsliefte an article 
entitled Aviatica, in which he depre- 
cates future construction of airships 
of tlie Zeppelin type. Herr Voll- 
moeller believes that aeroplanes, and 
not monster airships, liave the greater 
future, and advises Germans to pay 
more attention to the construction of 
the former. 



ADDRESSES BY 
RAILROAD MEN 

To Be Delivered at the 
Fourth Dry Farm- 
ing Congress. 

Billlings, -Mont.. Oct. 15. — Among the 
prominent speakers on the program of 
the fourth Dry Farming congress, 
which will meet at Billings, Oct. 26-28, 
are three of the leading railroad men 
of the country. James J. Hill, cliair- 
man of the board of directors of tlie 
Great Northern railway, whose utter- 
ances regarding the agricultural de- 
velopment of the West and the neces- 
sity for hastening the increase in the 
production of wheat in the United 
States have attracted national atten- 
tion and resulted in wide discussion 
of tlie problems of agriculture, has as- 
sured Governor Norris, president of 
the Dry Farming congress, that he 
will be present at the Billings meet- 
ing if it is at all possible. Mr. Hill 
has not announced the subject of his 
address before the congress, but it is 
expected that he will discuss the 
broader phases of national develop- 
ment as affected by the upbuilding of 
the agricultural states of the North- 
west. . ,. ., .u 

Thomas Cooper, assistant to the 
president of the Northern Pacific rail- 
way, will address the congress, his 
subject being announced as The 
Great Northwest." ., ^ 

George W. Holdrege. vice president 
and general manager of the Burling- 
ton railway, representing one of the 
first railroads along whose lines dry 
farming experiments were established 
with scientific effectiveness, will de- 



STEAM PIPE EXPLODES. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Engineer J. D. 
Henrv. in cliarge of the power plant 
at tiie state university, was seriously 
injured Wediitsday when the big 'T" 
nil.*' exploded. Henry was standing 
directly under the pipe at the time 
and was severely scalded about the 
head and sliouldeis. 

• i 

\Vh a Top Xotfh lloer. 

Great deeds compel regard. The worlj 
crowns its doers. That's why the Amer- 
ican people have crowned Dr. King s 
New Discovery the King of Throat and 
Lung lemtdits. Every atom is a healtli 
force. It kills germs, and colds and la, 
grippe vanish. It heals cough-racked 
membranes and coughing stops. Sore, 
inflamed bronchial tubes and lungs are 
cured and liemorrhagts cease. Dr. Geo. 
More. Black Jack, N. C. writes "It 
cured me of lung trouble, pronounced 
hopeless by all d^.ctors." 50c, $1.00 
Trial bottle free. Guaranteed by all 
druggists. 





mn 



18 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



SATURDAY SELUNG OF 

MILLINERY. 



EXQUISITE 



Hundreds of beautifully Trimmed Hats at Popular Prices. 
Every one trimmed in our own workrooms by first-class trim- 
mers, and no two alike— Velvets, Silks, P.enp^alines, Felts, Silk 
Plushes and Beavers— all the very late;?^ shai)es. We invite 
your inspection and would call your attention to the Hats we 
are showing at — 

$3.50, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00 

We believe you will find the above extra values. 

We do not confine ourselves to the above prices, but show 
the very latest creations at prices ranging from $12.50 and 
^15.00 up to $50.00. 

In Ladies' Furnishings we are showing many of the latest 
in Neck Dressings, Coat Sets, New Waists, Jewelry Ornaments! 



and Bags 



We Invite You to Call. 
No Trouble to Show Goods. 















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14 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD 








TY SALE 





MDWAOT! 



$25,000 STOCK 



Of Hart Schaffner & Marx, Kohn Bros., Kuppenheimer and Friend Bros.' Clothing, Tiger and Gordon Hats and Caps, Gordon & Ferguson Plush-lined and Fur Overcoats. Wilson Bros.' Furnishing 
Goods, Pilgrim, Dayton, Selz, Sharood, M. D. Wells, Foot-Schultz, Racine and Gotzian Shoes, recently owned by the Palace Clothing Co., St. Joseph, Mo., which was slightly damaged by water; also a 
big lot of manufacturers' samples of Sweater Coats, Socks, Underwear, Hats, and Caps, Gloves and Mittens, Boys', Children's and Ladies' Shoes, will be sacrificed. By 



THE GRE 





SALVAGE CO. 



No. 6. Lake Avenue Souths Corner Superior Street (Next Door to Olympic Fruit Go.) 

We were fortunate enough to secure this stock for almost nothing and now it is up to the public of Duluth and vicinity to take advantage of this great opportunity. Never before, never again will 
you get such standard merchandise, with the maker's name as a guarantee, at such low prices. A golden money-saving event that comes but once in a lifetime is right here before you now. You can 
not afford to let it go by. Think of it— a stock of high-grade merchandise, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing and Furnishings, a big line of Dry Goods, Men's, Ladies' and Children's Shoes 
and Rubbers to be disposed of at ridiculously low prices. 



I- 



Mf:\'S AXI> BOYS' CL<:)THIN'«. 

Men's high-grade union-made Suits, 
made by Cohn Bros., nonr- of them 
worth less han $15 to 

J 18 — will go for 

]\[en's union-made suits, made by 
the "L," System, every garment 
bears the union label, sold for $20 
ana $-5.00 — go 

for 

Friend Bros.' Clothing. in blue 
serges and black, unfinished worst- 
ed and black clay worsted — $20.00 
and $25.00 grades, will 

go for 

We have a big lot of odd suits, 
made by Kuppenheimer, and other 
high-grade manufacturers, only one 
or two of a kind, formerly sold for 
$18.00 to $20.00 — 

go at 

Hart Schaffner & Mar.x $20.00 and 
$25.00 suits go 
at 

Hart Schaffner & Marx $35.00, $40 
and $45.00 Suits go 
at 

'"Sweet Orr" Overalls, 
worth $1.00, go at . . 

Men's E.xtra Heavy Wool Soiks 
regular 50c and 60c 
values at 

Mens All Wool Socks, 
35c values at 



$4.95 

s. made by 
y garment 
sold for $20 

$9.95 

in blue 
shed worst - 
jted — $20.00 

$7.75 

odd suits. 
•, and other 
rs, only one 
rly sold for 

$4.95 

$20.00 and 

$9.95 

- $35.00, $40 

$13.95 
69c 

SoL'ks; 

36c 
19c 



MK>S .\.M> liOYS' CLOnilXG. 

A lot of single coats and vests of 
very fine material — 

will go for 

400 pairs Melton and Kersey 
Pants, worth up to $5 ^O ^C 
— will go for $1.45 and. .^CtmHQ 
Boys' Suits worth up 

to $5.00 — go at 

Young Men's Suits up to i^ize 20 — 
all wool patterns — 
your choice, full .suit 

Children's Sample Suit.'^, worth as 
high as $8 and $10 — 
will go at 

Assortment of Men's Silk Hose, 

35c and 50 values, 

at 

Men's Silk Ties. 35c and 
5 Oc values, at 

MEN'S SHOES. 

Gotzian, Sherood and Foot-Schultz 

Shoes, in hea\T velour calf and 

gun metal, regular 

price $5.00 — to sell 

Working Shoes, made 

Co.. Chicago, regular 

$3.00 values — 

per pair 

SPECIAL XOnCE. 
A lot of shoes, all makes, in calf, 
kid and patent leather, worth up 
to $5.00 — small sizes — 
all to go at 



$2.98 

d Kersey 

(2.45 
$1.69 

) iiize 20 — 

$2.98 

■!, worth as 

$2.95 

Hose, 

29c 
19c 



$2.85 

y Selz & 
2.50 and 

$1.19 



KOHN BROS. AND ROSENWALD 

& WIEL OVERCOATS. 

These overcoats need no descrip- 
tion as to their value, as the name 
tells all to those acquainted witl 
high-grade clothes. Regular $40 
overcoats, full length, fancy cuff 
and lapels, black, blue and brown 
and gray mixtures 
— to be sold -t . . 



$16.95 



Regular $25 Overcoats, latest styles 
and shades — all wool, nothing bet- 
ter, to be disposed 
of at 



$12.95 



98c 



150 Fancy Overcoats in light grays, 
tans, green and olive shades, fancy 
collars, cuffs and pockets, regular 

price $15.00 — 

now for 

Plush-lined coats, with fur collar, 
made b> Gordon & Ferguson, worth 
up to $35.00 — 
to go at 

Boys' Overcoats, worth $3.00 to 
$5.00 — now on sale 

at 

Young Men's Overcoats, worth 

to $9.00 — now 

on sale at 



I, I c-g Uldl 

$8.5 

jr collar, 
an, worth 

$17.98 

1 $3.00 to 

$1.98 

worth up 

$3.98 



EXTRA SPECIAL. 

15 Fur Coats, made by Gordon 
Ferguson, worth up 
to $45, to go at 



& 



$16.98 



HATS AND CAPS. 

300 dozen of Men's, Boys' and Chil- 
dren's Hats and Caps, made by the 
best maker.s, such as Gordon & 
Ferguson, and Blake & Waite — 
values up to $2.00, will QCtf% 
go at 14c, 19c, 46c and 09C 

Men's $2.00 and $2.50 QCa 

Derby Hats at WwC 

Men's and Boys' Winter I Cm 
Caps, worth 50c, at .... IwC 

Fedoras and Soft Hats in all the 
latest stylos at greatly reduced 
prices. 

Tiger Hats, sold aJl f •! "f Q 

over at $3.00 — go at ... * la I %| 

PANTS. 

4 00 high-grade, all wool Avorsted 
pants, made by the Reading Mills 
at Reading, Pa., regu- 05^ Al% 
lar price $3.50, go at..0fiianrW 
250 all-wool panta, black and blue 
.serges and heavy Scotch mi.xtures, 
worth $2.50 — to be a-i ^i- 



BOY'S' KN'EE PANTS. 



50 all-wool 
knee pants, 
$1.00, now 

A lot of 



heavy weight Boys' 
regular price OQm 

boys' knee pants, regu- 



$1.75 



sold for 

A lot of extra panta, heavy winter 
weights, worth from $2.50 ts $3.50 
— to be slaughtered 
at 



$1.39 



Extra high-grade all worsted pants, 
made by Rosen wald & Wiel, regu- 
lar price $3.50 to $ 
While they last, at . 



$3-95 



23c 

.^ patterns 

$3.95 

nd brown 
:ed for less 

$2.45 



lar 50c values — to 

go at 

BOY'S' SUITS 

125 Suits, all wool, fancy patterns 

and latest .styles, 

worth $7 — to go at . 

50 fancy light gray and brown 

suits, cannot be duplicated for less 

than $5.00 — to be sold 

for 

A lot of regular $4.00 values, fancy 
mixtures, to ro during «• 4 M Q 
this sale at « la^D 

MI:N'S SHIRTS AND UNDER- 
WEAR. 

Wilson Bros.' Silver and Gold 
Brand Shirts, worth $1.00 
— to go at 

Men's Black Sateen 

Shirts to go at 

Men's Heavy Ribbed Woolen Un- 
derwear, that sells for $1 
a garment, to go at 



39c 
33c 

len Un- 

59c 



1.000 yards Ginghams, 

and 12c; on sale 

at 



worth 10c 



4c 

(One piece to each customer.) 



MEN'S UNDERWEAR. 

300 dozen high-grade assorted 
ribbed and fleece lined underwear, 
best make in the country 
— to go at 

Men's plush back wool underwear 
that sells for $1.25 — will 
be sold for . . . . ; 

MENS SA\'EATER COATS. 

All wool heavy ribbed, all colors, 
best quality, worth from $4.00 to 
$5.00 — will be dis- 
posed of for 

Our $3.00 line of all-wot. Sweater 
Coats will be disposed tfj | QC 
of for ipi.^d 

Our heavy Working Sweater Coats 
that retail at $1.50 to 

$2.00, will go at 

OVERALLS. 
Our 50c and 750 line of QQa 

Overalls will go at vV 

MACKINAWS AND SHEEP- 
LINED COATS. 
Maloon & Foston made Macki- 
naws and Sheep-lined Coats, all 
lengths, both canv." and corduroy, 
Mittens and Glove- and Gold Seal 
Rubbers and Overshoes to be sold 
at prices that will surprise you. 
Men's Pure Silk Sleeve Holders, 
regular 25c values, 
at 

$3.00 to $3.50, on sale 
at 



29c 

erwear 

69c 

TS. 

colors, 
. .,1.00 to 

$2.75 

iweater 

1.95 

■ Coats 

79c 



12c 
$2.00 



Store Open Evenings 



GREAT E 




LADIES' SHOES. 

100 pairs Misses' Vici Kid, Box 
Calf and Kangaroo Kid Shoes, in 
button and lace, regular $1.50 and 
$2.00 values — go on sale 
at per pair 



69c 



•* 



(Made by Gotzian Shoe Co.) 
250 pairs Women's Genuine Good- 
year Welt Shoes, all blucher cut 
and all the fancy styles, wide toes, 
swing toes, which have been the 
best $4.00 seller — 01 | fkC 

go on sale at |^ A ■ v V 

(Made by Mayer Shoe Co.) 

The Selz Royal Blue, high-grade 
union-made shoes, vici kids and 
calf, regular $3.50 
values, to be sold for. . . 

F. Meyer's Milwaukee Shoes, in 
velour calfs, kids and patent leather 
— military and walk-over heels — 
worth $2.50 — to be 
sold for 



• r— H 



«tr- 



$1.95 



$1.48 



Tiin '«fM-fT< 



400 pairs Child's Vici Kid, Box Calf, 
blucher, heavy .soles and turn soles, 
all the latest in fancy tops, such 
as white kid top, patent vamps, 
cloth tops. This ic some- 
thing for almost nothing. . 

300 pair Children's Shoes, in but- 
ton and lace — not a pair in this lot 
worth less than $1.50 — 
to go for 



69c 

n but- 
;his lot 

65c 



*•• 




Store Open Evenings 



OFFICIAL NOTIOII : Money will be cheerfully refun(ded if purchase is not exactly as represented. 



Remember the Number and Look for the Red Sign. | 

B No. 6 Lake Avenue South 

^^^ We have no connection with any other sale in the city. 



^EW AHACK ON "SYSTEM' 



(Continued from page 1.) 



ernor Hariley of Mis.souri to send some 
strong resoiuliuns to the two United 
States senators from Missouri at Wash- 
ington, asking them to lay the reso- 
tlons before the senate and have that 
body instruct the interstate commerce 
commission to investigate the records 
made ty tiie railways, and that if their 
big profits were made on inter.«tate 
traffic, then the national board should 
cause the Interstate railroad rates to be 
reduced, so they would only receive a 
reasonable profit. 

La Follette in part says: 

"Did that resolution get by Aldrich- 
Hale- fcllkins management? It did not. 
This ii what happened to it; quoted 
from the Congressional Record: 

'Mr. Hale: I ask that the resolu- 
tion be referred, or, if necessary, I 
•will move that it will be referred to 
the committee on interstate commerce. 

■'Mr. Warner: If the senator from 
Maine will pardon me a moment, mv 
colleague has asked that it may lie on 
the table for the present. 

Kcsardrd An a Vent. 

"Mr. Hale: It will never he in anv 
better condition, but will Cf)me up to 
pester us whenevei- it is reached. J 
think I must move that it be referred 
to the committee on interstate com- 
merce 

"Mr. Klkins: I quite agree with the 
senator from Maine. I take it that 
the r?.solution Is clearly against the 
order of the senate. It ought to go 
directly to the committee, and it ought 
rot be reappearing here. It was up on 
Friday, and it is up again today. 
Otherwise a number of u.^ on that com- 
mittee would feel that we ought to be 
here all the time in the morning hour 
to look after the resolution. I tliink 
It is quite out of order, and it ought 
to go to the committee on Interstate 
commerce. 

"Mr. Hale: I make that motion. 

"The president pro tempore: The 



senator from Maine moves that the 
resolution be referred to the commit- 
tee on interstate commerce. 

"Mr. Warner: The senator says that 
it ought to be placed where it will not 
be continually reappearing. I appre- 
hend when it gets to the committee 
on interstate commerce tliere will be 
no danger of its reappearing. 

"Mr. Hale: It undoubtedly will not 
appear at this session. 

"Mr. Elklns: That is precisely what 
I mean. It ought not to be reappear- 
ing here during the session, unless we 
ciiange tlie order of the senate. 
What Brc&iue of It. 

"The president pro tempore: The 
senator from Maine moves the refer- 
ring of the resolution to the commit- 
tee on interstate commerce." 

Tiie motion was agreed to. 

In that way the "system" was able to 
put Missouri's reso^tions .asking the 
interstate commerce commission to in- 
vestigate the railroads' big profits un- 
der the table of the United States sen- 
ate. 



UNCLE SAM HAS POWED TO 
MAKE DLLITH GO "DRY" 



(Continued from page 1.) 



treaty of Sept. 30, 1854, prohibits the 
sale or manufacture of liquor in Du- 
luth and the other territory named. 
The next move, tliey say, is up to the 
federal authorities. What tlie govern- 
ment will do, the Civic league officers 
say, they are unable to ioreca.st. 

Judge Morris' decision In federal 
court yesterday, holding that federal 
officers had a right to close saloons in 
municipalities in the territory covered 
by the Indian treaties without inter- 
ference on the part of state or munic- 
ipal officers, is important in support 
of the contention that the sale of liq- 
uor can be prohibited in Duluth and 
saloons abolished. 

Article 7 of the treaty of Sept. 30. 
1S54, in which Duluth is interested, 
reads as follows: "No spirituous liquors 




A Few Pointers 



There is no portion of 
that needs more attentio 



your wearing apparel 
n than your Footwear. 



Dressing your feet correctly is the greatest in- 
dividuality one can have. 




shall be made, sold or used on any of 
the lands herein set apart for the resi- 
dence of the Indian.*', and the sale of 
the same siiall be prohibited in the 
territory hereby ceded, until other- 
wise ordered by the president." 

The correspondent between Bert N. 
Wlieeler, president of the Civic league, 
and Chief Clerk C. T. Hanke of the 
bureau of Indian affairs of tlie depart- 
ment of the interior, has developed the 
fact that the president of tlie United 
States has never modified tlie pro- 
hibitory provisions of the treaty. 
Treaty of 1S54. 

The treaty of Sept. 30, 18.54. was 
drawn up and signed at La Pointe, 
Wis., and under it the Chippewa In- 
dians of I.iake Superior ceded to the 
United States all of their land lying 
east of tlie following line: Begin- 
ning at the point of intersection of the 
east branch of the Snake river with 
the southern boundary line of the 
Chippewa country, thence north in a 
straight line to the mouth of the Kast 
i'avannrJi river, thence on up the St. 
Louis river to the mouth of the East 
Swan river, thence up the East Swan 
river to its source, thence in a north- 
westerly straight line to the fartliest 
westerly bend of the Vermilion river, 
and thence down to the mouth of the 
Vermilion river. 

The east branch of the Snake river 
intersects what was the southern 
lioundary of the Chippewa country in 
Kanabec or Mille Lacs county, and the 
f nd of the line is at the mouth of the 
Vermilion river on the north shore, so 
that all of the territory east of thai 
line will take In the western part of 
St. Louis pounty. Cook and Lake coun- 
ties and large portions of Northern 
Wisconsin and Northern Minnesota. 
Reservations were made for tlie L'Anse, 
Odanah and Fond du Lac Indians. 

The treaty of 18.'.5 took in all of the 
territory of the line In the Chippewa 
country, and it is under that treaty 
that the federal officers have been pro- 
ceeding in the western part of the 
state. The only difference in the pro- 
hibitive provisions of the two treaties 
is that in the treaty of 1854 the presi- 
(ient is given the power to modify 
the provision, while in the treaty of 
1855 it can only be modified by act of 
congress. The provisions have never 
been modified in eitlier treaty. 

The whole thing is now up to the 
federal authorities and what action 
tliey will take, if any, is problemati- 
cal. If they should start the enforce- 
ment of the prohibitive provisions of 
the treaty of 1854. the liquor interests 
could only save their business by a 
successful appeal to the president, as 
tlie municipal and state authorities 
would have no power. The temperance 
advocates are lining up tlieir forces to 
prevent any modifications of the pro- 
visions of the treaty if an appeal is 
made to the president, and further 
developments will be awaited with in- 
terest by both sides. 

DULUTH PEOPLE THEIR 

POOREST CUSTOMERS 




(Continued from page 1.) 



are mild and asefribe the conditions to 
thoughtlessnes.s, but the feeling is the 
same, that they are not receiving tiio 
lo^alty of the city in which they have 
Invested their money. Some even ex- 
claim that Duluth people prefer to go 
out of town to buy materials which 
could be Durchased here for the s^ne 
or a better price. 

A Convrnipnee Only. 

The manufacturers say tliat the re- 
tailers seem prejudiced against Duluth- 
made products for some reason which 
tlffey are at a loss to explain. They re- 
port tlifficulty in getting orders of any 
size from them. The best that is done 
for the home manufacture:- by the re- 
tailer is to use him to lielp him out of a 
tight place. If he runs sliort of some- 
thing the manufacturer carries, he runs 
down for the smallest order he can get. 
enough to tide him over until he can 
get a shipment of the same goods from 
an outside manufacturer or jobber. 

"We don't know what's the matter," 
said ojie of them today. "We Just can- 
not seem to get a foothold here." 

Hut eacli expresses a great and 
abiding faith in the Zenith City. Their 
respective industries are prospering on 



orders received Irom Jorher cilies. and 
they are hoping that Dulutli will soon 
wake up to a realization of :he true 
situation. 

If Duluth people supported'^liome in- 
dustries thte manufacturers an* others 
agree that Dulutli would double lier 
population in a year or two. The rea:son 
assigned for a comparatively slow 
growth is that too much money is go- 
ing to other cities to aid In t!ieir up- 
l>uilding Instead of staying here to be 
turned back into local char nels of 
trade. 

Some Fuuernlii Needed. 

"There's got to be a few funerals be- 
fore Duluth will truly come into her 
(.>wn." was the startling manner in 
which Jamts F. Dacey, president of the 
Gogebic Boiler works, expressed him- 
self when asked his opinion ol the lo- 
cal situation. "When some of these 
old fogies have passed out of tlie way, 
and younger, more energetic and more 
patriotic men take the managemnt of 
aftalrs, you will Fee a revolution in 
Duluth. Tlie way she will jump 
k!i« ad will not be slow. 

"If Dulutli supijorted home indus- 
tries she would now be boastmg a 
population of 150,000 to 200.000. Peo- 
ple say that it's only a little thing, 
hut its the little tilings that count. 
Allien 1 build a house I specif/ in tin, 
contracts that everj tiling that can pos- 
sibly be secured h>ire shall be bought 
liere. I see that my rig.ars are made in 
Duluth. and I supply my table from 
produce grown in or about the city. 
That's wliat every man in the city 
ought to do." 

Mr. U)acey was not handling anybody 
with glovea while talking on the sub- 
ject. He said that he had had a great 
deal of experience with Duluth people, 
and had found them lacking. 

"Par example," he said, "tak? the Y. 
M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. Tliey are 
institutions built in Duluth witli money 
raised in Duluth by popular s ibscrip- 
tion. Yet they didn't buy all the ma- 
terial that went into them in tils city. 
I know, of my own knowledge, that 
they didn't get" tlieir boilers he e. Foi' 
a small difference in price they sent 
to another city in Illinois. In at least 
one of these cases we offered to make 
good the difference in the price, about 
$13. but without success. And there 
are dozens of cases of the same kind 
that I miglit cite." 

H. L. Caldwell. Jr., of the Aroma 

Coffee company. Second avenue east 
and Michigan streets, says that the lo- 
tiil dealers do not handle coffee roast- 
ed in Duluth. "We don't seem ai;Ie 
to touch the Duluth g^■ocers, with one 
or two exceptions," he said, "although 
we more than hold our own In other 
states, where the competition is keen 
and hard." 

Local Support I>ackluK. 

Hans Christensen, president of the 
CI ristensen-Mendenhall-Graham com- 
n.anuy, manufacturers of woolen gar- 
ments, says tliat IJuluth people are not 
buying nearly thj quantity of Duluth- 
niade goods that they should. He de- 
clares that support is distinctly lack- 
ing. 

C. 'e. De Witt of the De Witt-Seitz 

company stated that his company 
would not have outgrown swaddling 
clothes if tliey had had to dei^end upon 
Duluth sales to produce an Income. 
But the company lias attained large 
proportion, and is already building a 
big addition to its new home en Lake 
avenue south. 

The campaign for the support of 
home industries is finding mucti favor 
among business men, and the public 
is boginning to recognize that Duluth 
would be a bigger Duluth if goods 
made in Duluth found a bigger sale 
here. When the matter is laid before 
them, Duluthians roy that tiiey know 
Duluth would sliow more prosperity 
and a great Increase in population if 
everybody insisted upon getting: home- 
made goods whenever possible. 

No question has been raised as to 
the merit of Duluth goods. The 
goods stand for themselves, and are 
more than holding their own in other 
fields, where the biggest houses of the 
East and Middle West are leaving no 
stone unturned to get all the business 
in sight. 



CARRIED UP BY KITES. 



Boy Sails Away for 50 Yards Far 
Above Earth. 

Worcester, Mass., Oct. 15. — Ralph A, 
Cooper of Boston, who has been ex- 
perimenting in kite-flying at the home 
of his uncle In Rockdale, took a sail 
skyward Saturday at the end of a 
group of box kites he had tied together 
for experimental purposes. 

He fastened three kites together, and 
wlien they pulled strong he borrowed 
three more and fastened them in the 
form of a maltese cross. They mea- 
sured about nine feet in width and 



height. Late in the afternoon the kites 
were sent up, and it required two boys 
to hold them. When at a heiglit of 300 
feet Cooper relieved his companions 
and thought he was able to handle 
them himself. 

When a strong breeze blew up the 
boy was lifted from the ground. He 
called for help and hung to the rope 
attached to the kites. He was raised 
to a height of twenty feet and was 
carried ' with the wind flftv yards 
toward Greenville Pond. He was 
screaming and several boys rushed to 
assist him. They followed the path of 
the kites, and a short distance from the 
pond the wind subsided and the kites 
dropped a few feet until they were pro- 
tected under a hill from tlie wind and 



gradually came down. 

When ten feet from the ground 
young Cooper dropped and was badly 
bruised. The kites sailed away and the 
boy was taken to the home of his uncle, 
bruised and frightened by his experi- 
ence. 



TRAIN KILLS LOGfiER. 

Brainerd, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Con O'Neill, a log- 
ger, is dead at a loc;U hrtSpltal of 
injuries received In me local rail- 
road yards Wednesday, when he 
was struck by :v freight train and 
his back broken. His widow and five 
children, in destitute circumstances, 
survive liim. 




225-2^7 



Seventh i 983987 



y P3)^neAve.(i TowerAve 



son 




CLOTHING OF QUAUTY 



f|W|E OFFER to the good people 
of Duluth thebest Men's Cloth- 



Don't comjiiain about tlie cost of 
living. Barthe-Martin sell groceries 
at wholesale. 



mm 



ing that money and brains can buy. 

We buy big for five stores and 
this enables us to offer these clothes 
at prices that actually mean a saving 
of from 15% to 25% to you. 

Do Your Shopping Here. 

Suits and Overcoats . . . $15,00 to $35,00 
Underwear, Sweater Coats $1,00 to $5.00 
Wilson Bros> Siiirts ^t^^ $L00 to $2,50 

J. B. Stetson and The Gordon Bats $3.00 to $5.00 



Famous and G. & F. Gloves 



$1.00 to $2.50 



Just Wrigiit and J. A. Banister Shoes $4.00 & $5.00 








■iJbi-MiaM 



J • . - ■ r- 







uM ig~ mr nt rm~r7a »« r 



H " ^ o" 



»i. f i ■!'»» 



It 

I f 

s: 



-~~i~"'~ 



INDIGESTION IS 
ENDED FOREVER 

No Heartburn, Gas, Dys= 

pepsia or Headache Five 

Minutes Later. 



t 



-&A 



■ tm'S^t 



Nothing will remain undigested or 
Bour on your stomach if you will take 
a little Diiipepsin occasionally. This 
powerful digestive antacid, though 
as harmless and pleasant as caady, 
will digest and prepare for assimila- 
tion into the blood all the food you 
can eat. 

Eat what your stomach craves, 
without the slightest fear of Indi- 
gestion or that you will be bothered 
with sour risings. Belching, Gas on 
Stomach, Heartburn, Headaches from 
stomach. Nausea, Bad Breath. Water 
Brash or a feeling like you had swal- 
lowed a lump of lead, or other dis- 
agreeable miseries. Should you be 
suffering now from any stomach dis- 
order you can get relief within five 
minutes. 

If you will get from your phar- 
macist a 50-cent case of Pape's Dia- 
pepsin vou could always go to the 
table with a hearty appetite, and your 
meals would taste good, because you 
would know there would be no !»">- 
gestion or SleepU-ss nights or Head- 
ache or Stomach misery all the next 
day; and. besides, you would no need 
laxatives or liver pills to keep your 
stomach and bowels clean and fresh 

Pape's i>iapepsin can be obtamed 
from vour druggist, and contains more 
than sufficient to thoroughly cure the 
worst case of Indigestion or Dyspep- 
sia. There is nothing better for Gas 
on the Stomach or sour odors from 
the stomach or to cure a Stomach 
Headache. 

You couldn't keep a handier or 
more useful article in the house. 



UNaE SAM 

IS SUPREME 

Federal Authorities Cannot 

Be Interfered With in 

Indian Territory. 

And Mahnomen County Is 

Still Indian Territory, 

Says Court 



BnUders' Hardware. Me- 
chanics' Tools. Fine CuUery 

QUAYLE-LARSON CO. 



Ic Second Avenue West. 



ffealth 

ACTUALLY, POSITIVELY, IN- 
VARIABLY RESTORES GRAY 
HAIR TO THE COLOR AND 
VIGOR OF YOUTH. 

You can't look young if your haii is gray, faded, 
dull and iifeiess. Hay's Hair Health will bring 
back the natural color, just as it was when you 
were young. Stops dandruff and failing out. 
Makes the hair bright, silky and full of life and 
beauty — nOt H dye— won't color or soil yoiu 
skin. 

SI AND 50c. BOTTLES. AT DRUGGISTSw 
Bay's Harflna S»o«p cures Kczema, red, 

roui,'ii and chapped hands, and all ^kia diseases. 

Keeps skin fine and snit, 25c. druppists. Send 

Zc. tor fre*; bonks, "The Car© of the Slan," "The 

Care of the Hair." 
Plailo Hay Spec Co^ Newark. N. J. 



FALL JEWELRY 

Now on Displaj- — Beautiful Xoveltlea 

J. GRUESEN, 

Jeweler and \*'atchu»aker. 

125 West Superior Street. 

Upstairs over the Big Duluth Store, 



For an enjoyable time g^o to 

TEMPLE 
ROLLER RINK 

Second Avenue East. 



Accordinir to the decision handed 
down yesterday afternoon by Judge 
Page Morris of the federal court, In- 
dian territory or territory set aside for 
the Indians Is always considered Indian 
territory until an act of congress de- 
crees otherwise. Federal officers do- 
ing their duty in accord with the laws 
of the United States are not subject to 
state officials. 

The decision was made In the case 
of William E. Johnson, a special 
TTnited States officer, granting his peti- 
tion and those of nine deputies for 
writs of habeas corpus. 

The special officer and his deputies 
had been lmprl.«ioned by state officials 
for tlie destruction of a quantity of 
liquor in a saloon at Mahnomen. The 
saloon keeper wanted tliem punished 
for the malicious destruction of prop- 
erty. They claimed tliat the liquor 
was found in Indian territory and It 
as therefore their duty to destroy it in 
accordance with the laws of the United 
States. 

C. C. Cooper, acting county attor- 
ney of Mahomen county. Andrew Enge- 
set of the village of Mahnomen, and 
Senator F. H. I'eteraon of Moorhead 
represented the county, and C. C. 
Haupt and hi.s assistant, E. S. Oakley, 
represented tlie petitioners. 

1m Indian Territory. 
The government attorneys explained 
in opening the case that the land i=5 
unque.stionably Indian territory, as the 
result of treaties made with the Indians 
in 1855 and 1863. It was also declared 
Indian territory by an act of congress, 
and only an act of congress could make 
it otherwl.se. They claimed that as the 
land was Indian territory, the federal 
officers were doing no more than their 
duty in destroying the liquor found. 

Mr. Cooper, for the county, claimed 
that all the land in the county had long 
been lived upon and owned by white 
people; also, that the people of that 
section should iiave all the rights and 
privileges of people who resided in 
othor sections of the state. He said 
that the Indian.s had all been made 
citizens: that the elections were all held 
in accordance with the state law; and 
that it was under tlie direct supervision 
of state officials. These things being 
true. Mr. Cooper thought that the state 
officials were able to look after liquor 
violations, and that the federal officers 
were, therefore, acting beyond their 
power. . 

In his decision, Judge Morris said: 
•The White Earth reservation is Ii-- 
dian tcrritorv. With the Red Lake. 
Leech Lake and Cass Lake tracts it 
has been mi-rked out as a special area 
for the Indian. Tnis wis the into-ntion 
oi' congress in the act establishing the 
reservation. I think the government 
lad for it.s purpose to make the In 
dian c--mpetent and self-supporting. 
This is the object of the statute, f^lear- 
Iv And if congress wished to release 
thf country from the liquor laws In- 
tended lor the protection of tiie In- 
dians, it would have said so. But un- 
til It does, such meaning will not be 
r^ad into the law by this court. The 
rights of the state of Minnesota are 
not infringed upon in the enactment. 
Tlie people have the right to form 
their towns and villages under slate 
liiws. But when state officials attempt 
to nullify the laws of congress which 
hi-ve for their purpose tlie furthering 
of the independence of the Indian in 
removing from him the curse of drink 
by directlv subjecting him to its in- 
fluenceii, they are out of the bounds ot 
thei' jurisdiction. This court, at least, 
until it can be shown that the White 
Ear'h leservation is not within the 
pale of the act of congress, will not 
aMcw a municipal court to override 
thn laws of the United States." 

HIGH PRICE IS 
PAID FOR PINE 



Every Woman 

l3 Interested ar.d should kno» 

abuut the wonderrr.l 

MARVEL >Khirling Spray 

e tnjT Taflail fiTrlBK*. Jnjec- 
ti'^n and .Suction, lleat— Saf- 
e»t— Mo»t Conrenlent. 
ItClMaaes UiUnUj 




_l j«sr drarriM for lU 

' hr cannot supply th« 
..lARVKI.. accept do 
other, hut send tUinp for 
tUiutrated book— ^«i»d It airea 
full nartlculars and •Itrpi'tions In 
valuable to la.i!ea. M.*RVBI- CO., 
«« m. 9841 BT.. NBW ««»Rtk. 



M. E. KIRSCH'8 FlXERAi. 

Crookston. Minn., Oct. 15. — ^Special 
to The Herald. )— The funeral of the ex- 
county commissioner and former post- 
master, M. E. Kirsch was held from 
the home No. 419 North Elm street, at 

9 45 a m. today and from St. Annes 
church where the services began at 

10 o'clock The Knights of Columbus 
of which deceased was a member had 
charge of the funera!. The church was 
crowded during the services. 

M1NNE80TANS TO START 

BANK AT MISSOULA, MONT. 

Mi.ssoula, Mont.. Oct. 15. — Senator 
Andrew Stephens of Crookston. Jolin 
P Heldberry. L. M. Olson. Jol'.n Dahl- 
gren and C. Wittenson. all Minne- 
BOians. and E. O. Olberg of Hamilton 
Mont., formerly of i^pooner. Minn., will 
open the Scandinavian-American bank, 
the fourth banking institution in Mis- 
soula, early in December, with a capi- 
tal stock of $50,000. 



Colvin-Robb Company Gives 

$15.10 for Standing 

Timber. 

St. Paul. Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Standing pine sold at 
$15.10 a 1.000 feet, yesterday in the 
timber sale conducted by Samuel G. 
Iverson. state auditor, and this marks 
the record price obtained for green 
timber in the forest. This figure was 
reached after spirited bidding between 
William T. Bailey and the Colvln- 
Fiobb Lumber company of Blwabik, 
which drove the mark up from the ap- 
praisement of $8 a 1,000 by the state 
cruisers. 

The best previous record was about 
$14 60. The high priced timber ob- 
tained by the Colvin-Robb company is 
on section 16. township 56. range 13 
west, and there is about 2,350,000 feet 
in the lot. ^ ,, , a 

About seventy lumbermen attended 
the sale, which was conducted in the 
senate chamber. 

Edward W. Backus and Will F. 
Brooks, representing the Backus- 
Brooks interests; George W. Eddy of 
Minneapolis, representing the fc>hev- 
iin interests; J. H. Nolan. St. Paul; Z. 
D Scott of the Scott-Graflf company, 
Duluth- J M. Wilson of the Johnson- 
Wentwortii company. Cloquet; John 
McAlpine of Duluth; V,\ D. U W in ton. 
Thief itlver Falls, and S. J. Cusson of 
the Virginia & Rainy River Lumber 
company, were present. 

Some of the largest stands were not 
bougiit. The second offering yesterday 
was 4 250,000 feet of pine, spruce and 
tamarack in Cook county, but none of 
the buyers would take it at the ap- 

raised price of $6 a 1.000 feet. 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1909 





THE HONEST 
PROPRIETARY MEDICINE 

fills a national need in the land and 
It will take more than the cry of 
"fraud" and "fake" from the avari- 
cious, over-reaching physician to over- 
throw an honest, reliable and standard 
preparation like Lydia E. Pinkham's 
Vegetable Compound, which is made 
from roots and herbs of the field, and 
has cured more women of female ills 
than any other rem<dy we know of. 



pi 



Winter is Witli Us Again 

And it will be necessary to wrap up 
warmly from now on. We want 
you to come and inspect our splen- 
did lines of Winter Wearables — you 
can surely find what you want ! 



^i>£^ 



The^ West Em 



John d Moe ScSonsCo 

(fbrmerhf Johnson JcMoe) 

21^ Ave Wi A Superior St,, Duluth, 



Pi^ 



merit Store 



K 



A Word About Special Prices 

We are able to give you advantages 
that no other store can, because we 
are wholesalers as well as retailers. 
It pays to buy here and get the 
wholesale price ! 



fWarm Winter Wearables! 



Catchy Coats for Cold Weatlier 

Our store is overflowing with the best and catchiest 
of the new Coat Creations. May we have the pleasure 
of showing them to you? We can mention but a few 
items below, the stock must be seen to be appreciated. 

Satin Lined Coats, $15, $18 up to $25 

Ladies' Broadcloths, Kerseys and Mannish Worst- 
eds, semi and tight-fitting, neatly trimmed with braid 
and buttons, in all the most popular shades. Lined 
throughout with a superior quality of satin — 
OUR PRICES, $15, $18 UP TO $25. 

Plusli and Fur Lined Coats $12.50 to $50 

Made in broadcloth, lined with plush and fur, high 
fur collar— OUR PRICES, $12.50 to $50. 

Three Quarter Lengtli Caracul Coats $10 

A big special ! Three-quarter length Caracul Coats, 
neatly trimmed with imitation astrakhan cuffs and collar, 

OUR PRICE, $10. 

Ladies' 50-inch Caracul Coats, lined throughout and 
trimmed with imitation astrakhan, fur collars, big val- 
ues, at — ^^^ ^^ 
OUR PRICES, $12.50 TO $22.50. 

Nobby Coats tor Misses 

Made in semi and tight-fitting styles, of the nobbiest 
fabrics, elegantly trimmed with braid and buttons, m all 
the wanted colors— OUR PRICES FROM $7.50 TO $15. 

Cosy Coats tor the Children 

We cany the most complete and economical line of 
Coats for the children that you will find anywhere, in all 
the newest fabrics and in the staple Broadcloths. Ker- 
seys, Mannish Worsteds and Velours, all neatly trimmed. 
' OUR PRICES RANGE FROM $3.98 TO $12.50. 

Swell Sweater Coats 

The new Long Sweater Coats are the very latest— 
we have them in gray and white at from $4.50 TO $10. 




New Suits Witli Snap and Style 

Our Latest Arrival 

EMPIRE DRESSES— the very newest creation, a 
semi-fitted dress, made of the finest broadcloths, serges 
and worsteds, trimmed with silk. Mohair braid and jet 
buttons. In all the popular and wanted plain and fancy 
colors, an especial bargain at — 

OUR PRICES, $12.50 AND $15.00. 

$37.50 ••Empire" Suits $25.00 

The best, most stylish and most serviceable of all 
Tailored Suits. In broadcloths, fancy worsteds and 
serges, with long, satin-lined coats and plain or pleated 
skirts. Good value at $37.50, unmatchable at— 
OUR PRICE $25.00 

A Special Lot of Suits at $20.00 

A selection of the newest fall styles taken from our 
$25 and $28 stocks, and priced down specially— 42 to 46- 
inch Coats, Pleated Skirts, in plain broadcloth and fancy 
worsteds, cut in the newest styles. Take your choice at— 
OUR SPECIAL. $20.00 

Snappy Suits tor $15.00 

Exceptionallv good values at this price! Suits with 
snap and swing, 'in all the newest styles, plain and fancy 
colors. You cannot afford to overlook them at— 
OUR PRICE $15.00 

These are our three BIG SPECIAL PRICES-$25 
$20 and $15, take your choice according to your taste and 
means, but be sure that we will save you from $o to $8 
on your purchase. 

Fine Furs 

Have you inspected the new Furs yet? You should 
do so right away! We have all the new styles in scarfs, 
neck-pieces and muffs, all the best of their kind. Come 
and see what we have, note our exceptionally low prices 
and the exceptional quality of our goods, prices range 

from— 98c to $20. qq . (to 7p; 

FUR HATS — in very latest styles, from Sec to ^^./o. 



^Soft, Warm Underw'r for Men, 

Women and Children 



^(y 




These snappy mornings mak.a one feel the need of warmer 
Underclothing— supply your wants economically at our 
Underwear department! 
Ladies' Fleece Ribbed Underwear, a snow white 

garment, etxra good value, at 

Ladies' Silver and White Ribbed non-Shrinkable Wool 
Underwear; an exceptionally good garment 

at 

Ladies' Camel Hair Underwear, the kind 

that wears the best at 

LADIES' NIGHT-ROBES. 
Ladies' Flannel Night Robes in bright new patterns, neat 
ly trimmed, cut in full and large sizes, from 

$1.75 down to ' 

CHILDREN'S UNDERAVEAR. 
Children's Silver Fleeced Underwear, superior 
quality, in all sizes — your choice 

Children's Camel Hair Underwear: the underwear 
of quality and durability, at 35c to 

(Priced according to size.) 
Natural Wool Worsted Underwear; "the kind 
that mother wears," at 43c to 

(Priced according to size.) 

NIGHT ROBES. 

Child^^^TFlI^nel Night Robes in fancy patterns, neatly trimmed at 48c to 7."Sc. 

Men s Wool Underwear In good, staple colors- brown, white and tan-exceptionally good 

values at $1.00, $1.25 and $1.50. 
Men's Wool Sox, In white, blue and gray, good values at 25c and 60c. 
Men's Wool Mitts, warm and cheap, 25c. 



50c 

J Wool 

98c 
$1.00 

IS, neat- 

75c 

25c 
80c 

85c 



Modish Millinery 

The New Styles 







We have some very "Classy" styles in 

Hats at $5.00— artistically trimmed to 

suit the refined tastes of fastidious 

people. We will save you from $2.00 

to $3.00 on your new fall hat, if you 

will let us show you these models. 

These hats are neatly trimmed — not overloaded. They come in 

colors to match the new suits— Old Rose, Navy, Black, Jg AA 

Brown and new Green, and in Gray, at tpt/.W 

Come and see this big offer ! 

Every day we add new creations to our already fine 
assortment— prices range from $4.50 to 



$8.98 



The New Shapes 

New shapes are arriving every day. We are offering JQ gA 
the very latest creations at from $2.00 to W# 

Children's Tarns and College Hats, from 50^ to 98^ 



* r- . f Sma 



I • 



i^rs- 



i 



-«j 




party. He said no president could 
properly preside over the country until 
e\cry part of it participated in the 
government. 

Mr. Nagil deprecated a situation 
which made any state in the Union, 
Ncrth or South, surely Democratic or 
Republican merely because of Party. 

•The Republican party's biggest dan- 
oer" declared Mr. Nagel. "is that it 



there is 



as 



Boy a Year's Glove Supply 

You can easily afEord to do that at 
the tremendous glove sale tomorrow. 
$2 00 Ladi''-' New Kid Gloves at Jl.OO 



— and 



$1 



new k;d gloves 
for 89c. Sat- 
urday only at 




26 West Superior Street. 



'TORGET PARH" 
IS NAGEL'S PLEA 

Secretary of Commerce and 

Labor Addresses Voters 

in Virginia. 

Norfolk. Va.. Oct. 15.— "We are all 
patches on the same quilt, and we 
can't get away from it," argued Sec- 
retary Nagel of the department of 
commerce and labor, here last night, 
emphasizing the "national idea' and 
urging a Virginia audience, composed 
of both Democratic and Republlcar. 
voters, to br^-ak away from traditions 
and to stand lor the principles tliey 
1 believe to be right, irresyectivo ol 



A FAT WOMAN 
HATES SOCIETY 

Fat people have to get into clothes 
that are designed for people of normal 
physique. The men wear dress suits 
and look like comic pictures. The 
women wear low-necked dresses to 
their evident humiliation. This Is why 
It is often said that a fat woman 
hates society. Fat is as much the mis- 
Lake of poor health as anything else. 
The things that make fat should be 
making good blood, bone and nerves. 
The secret is that the digestive ma- 
chinery is out of gear. The juices 
make lat in too large quantities. Tim 
fat impedes circulation, cramps the 
heart, suppresses the liver, crowds the 
rungs and interferes with the stomach 
Marmola Tablets are l>ar"iless 'Tliey 
are taken after each meal. They help 
diKei<t that meal as nature intended It 
should be digested. They remove tlie 
fat already made at the rate of from 
twelve to fifteen ounces a day. ana 
they leave no flabby skin or wrinkles. 
Thev are sold wherever drugs are sold, 
or in the same category with harmful 
patent fat-reducers. They contain 
Marmola. Cascara Aromatic and Pep- 
permint water. If you do not care to 
call upon your druggist, send < 5 cents 
to The Marmola Company, Dept. 491, 
Detroit, Mich., and they will send you a 
large full-size case by return mall in 
plain package postage paid. 



may become careless because 
no one to scare it." 

RapH at Br>-an. 

He ref^?rred to the Democrats 
fcimlng the "negative" party. 

"And when I say Democratic party 
I don't mean Bryan." he added. "He 
Is for everything positive and every- 
thing negative, hoping that he will hit 
it right some time." 

Mr. Nagel's speech her«i was the last 
of two he came to Virginia to deliver 
to assist the Republicans in the gu- 
bernatorial c ampaign. 

WU TING FANG HAS 

ABANDONED SPIRITS. 

■^Vashington, Oct. 1&. — As far as the 
spirit world is concerned, it will have 
to worry along hereafter without rec- 
ognition or assistance of Dr. Wu Ting 
I'ang, Chinese minister to the United 

S tat^s 

The diplomat was discouraged by the 
publicity given his recent Investigation 
of the occult and the detailed account 
c.f his conference with a medium on 
Wednesday nig'lit. when the alleged 
v-pirits of his mother and President 
WMl am McKinley talked to him. He 
d<'c Ined to discuss his experience, but 
it was given out flatly la.st night at the 
''hliiese legation that Dr. Wu had dis- 
conllnuid his inquiries Into spiritual- 
isn^ to which he had been led, it was 
if nmated by the inleretit shown in it 
by such men as William T. Stead, pres- 
ident of William James, and the Italian 
ciimlnolo gist. Lombroso'. 

ONE YEAR FOR AUTOIST 

WHO KILLED WOMAN. 

Bridgeport. Conn.. Oct. 15. — Theodore 
C. Goetz of Stamford, an automobilist 
convicted by a jury of Involuntary 
manslaughter, was sentenced to jail 
for one year. The court said that the 
evidence showed that Goetz had taken 
a human life because jf gross care- 



lessness. 
Howe. 



His victim was Mrs. Sarah 



dry 

?ist- 
has 



DYING OF AN INGROWN NAIL. 

Gangrene Sets in, Then Old Man's 
Leg Is Cut Off. 

Hanover, Pa.. Oct. 15. — An ingrown 
toe nail will probably cost the life of 
Reuben Young, a wealthy octogenarian 
and vice president of the Hanover Sav- 
ing Fund society. Some time ago he 
had a chiropodist remove the nail, and 
gangrene developed. 

In the hope of saving his life the left 
leg was amputated above the knee by 
three Philadelphia siurgeons. 

CALLS WIFE FAITHLESS; 
TRIPLE TRAGEDY FOLLOWS. 

Cleveland. Ohio.. Oct. 15. — First kill- 
ing his wife and fatally wounding her 
sister, John Sherry, ,a painter, yester- 
day turned his revolver on himself and 
Is dvlng from a wound beneath his 
heart. The tragedy followed a quarrel 
in which he accused his wife of infi- 
delity and her sister as companion -in 
her adventures. 

■ 

LawMlte \o ReKisn. 

Washington. Oct. 15.— Discouraged 



in his search for health in t 
climate of the Southwest. Third Assist- 
ant Postmaster General Laws^ 
announced to the heads of the bureaus 
in his division that he intends to resign 
from the postoffice department. 

Don't complain aliout the cost of 
living. Barthe-Martin sell g-roceries 
at wholesale. 



WARE-KRAMER COMPANY 

PUT INTO BANKRUPTCY. 

Richmond, Va.. Oct. 15.— Judge Ed- 
mund Waddill, Jr., in the United States 
circuit court here, has placed the 
Ware-Kramer Tobacco company of 
Norfolk, Va.. in voluntary bankruptcy. 
The concern, which conducted an inde- 
pendent cigarette business, recently 
sued the American Tobacco company 
and the Wells- Whitehead Tobacco com- 
pany of Raleigh. N. C, daljn*"^ P""'" 
tive damages in the amount of 51.000,- 
000 for alleged acts damaging to the 
plaintiff company in violation of the 
federal anti-trust law. 



alliance already has $30,000 on hand 
for this project. It is not known where 
the college will be located, but it is 
conceded tliat it will be In Pennsyl- 
vania. 

An assessment of 1 cent a month on 
each member of the Polish National 
alliance was ordered to create a work- 
ing fund for use by the Polish com- 
mission on immigration. 

Detroi:, St. Louis. Niagara Falls. 
Boston and Hazleton, Pa., are working 
for the next rhnvention. 



•^ 



A 



CASTOR! A 

For XnfEincs and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 



Bears the 
Signature ot 



FOR POLISH COLLEGE. 

National Allianee in Session in Mil 
waukee Plans Undertaking. 

Milwaukee. WMs., Oct. 15.— Provi.<=lon 
for a home for aged Poles has been 
made by the convention of the National 
alliance. The organization voted an 
assessment of 1 cent a month on each 
of its 75,000 members to accumulate 
a fund for the construction and main- 
tenance of a suitable building. No 
action will be taken at this convention 
in regard to the site. 

The convention also levied an assess- 
ment of 2 cents a month on each mem- 
ber to establish a sufficient fund to 
erect and maintain a college for Polish 
students, with the number of courses 
offered by American institutions. The 



Don't compiain about the cost of 
living. Barthe-Martin sell groceries 
at wholesale. 

CAR COMPANIES (liMBINE. 

Amherst. N. S.. Oct. 15. — Rhodes. Cur- 
ry & Co. of Amherst, the Canada Car 
companv and Dominion Car Foundry 
comp.iny, both of Montreal, car manu- 
fa tunrs, have combined with a capital 
of $5.SOO.OOO. 

The Canadian Car company was con- 
trolled by the American Palace Car 
company and the Dominion Car Foun- 
dry company by Kelly & Co. of Chi- 
cago. 



^r » r-M-." 



. » ' * i» ' 



30 ft. Bowels— 

Biggest organ of the body — the 
bowels — and the mos t " importan t— 
It's got to be looked after— neglect 
means suffering and years of 
misery. CASCARETS help 
nature keep every part of your 
bowels clean and strong — then 
they act right — means health to 
your whole body. wi 

CA9CARET9 loc • txw for a week't t^e*^ 
Dieul All druRgist*. Biggt*. seller la 
tkc world — AUiUoB boxea a dumUo. 



. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




■•«— -^ ■ « - «■ ■ jr; 



j 







J 



16 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: .FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909 



AN ITCHING PALM 



No Cure or It. Other F'orms of Itch- 
ing l*rcl'erabk\ 

There is no cure for an itching palm 
— the money kind. Even poslam, the 
new skin (Ijscovery, cannot help it. 
But when it comes to eczema, the 
most annoying of Itching skin troubles, 
poslam will stop the itching at once 
and cure the worst cases in a few 
days. So with hives, rash, scabies, 
split toes, piles, and scaly scalp, all 
of which are different forms of ec- 
zema, accompanied by severe itching 
and caused by imperfect digestion and 
careless diet. 

Poslam comes in two-dollar jars, 
but fifty cents' worth will answer in 
curing any of the diseases mentioned. 
It can be had of any druggist. The 
Lyceum pharmacy and W. A. Abbett's 
In Duluth and the A. E. Holmberg 
Drug company in Superior make a 
specialty of it. 

That results are immediate will be 
amply demonstrated overnight by the 
use of the erperimental sample which 
the Emergency Laboratories, 32 West 
Twenty-fifth street, New York City, 
will send free by mail, in plain wrap- 
per, to any one who will write for it. 



"Tbe Tailor Shop of Dnlnlli for Ilea" 

First=Class 
Tailoring 

You cannot get better clothes 
— better styles or better fabrics 
— than our custom shop can fur- 
nish— 

Our many vears of reputa- 
tion as leailers in all matters 
pertaining to making clotlies is 
behind this statement — 

The garments we make are 
individual creations — Clothes of 
character — 

If you are one of the "hard 
to please' kind, and especially 
if you are biased by skepticl.«ni 
regarding our ability lo make 
vour clothes a» you want them 
iinndc, \OV are most urgently in- 
vited to put our statements of 
our abilities to the test. 

PRICES n.\><;E FROM »:io I I* 




4^6 HEST FIRST STREET . 



IMTKD STATES STEEL 
AND THE INTERESTS 
IX GREAT BRITAIN 



(Continued from page 1.) 



burg, for which they were charging 
Americans $30. That was four years 
ago. Now, when I go to the Steel cor- 
poration at Pittsburg for billets, they 
charge me |33 a ton. New York. We 
can buv them from British manufac- 
turers "for $J3 long ton, laid down in 
Glasgow." , . ., 

As it is quite well known that the 
Steel trust is out for business now as 
alwavs, it is reasonable to suppose, as is 
supposed here, that there is an agree- 
ment with the Steel association here 
not to undersell them any longer. 
Easland*N Steel Trust. 

There is no steel trust here in exact- 
ly the same sense as in America; 
there is no combination existing and 
operating in flagrant violation of the 
law, and with the apparent approval of 
the government: ther* are no anti- 
trust laws in Britain. There is an as- 
sociation of steel manufacturers, which 
Is of such authority and potency as to 
be able to enter into such an agree- 
ment with the American trust. 

I learn from a former engineer in 
the works of the United Slates Steel 
corporation that to produce the steel 
billets it costs from $14 to $15 a ton. 
This engineer is now connected with 
a British concern. So, even at $20 a 
ton there is a pretty good net profit to 
the Steel trust. The British steel work- 
ers found it difficult to compete with 
them here on llielr own ground. 

Considerable mystery seems to sur- 
round the c|uestion of making steel. 
The exact cost of production is one of 
those safely guarded secrets of Messrs. 
Frick Scliwab & Co. These live in 
constant dread that old man Andy 
Carnegie will give it away. 

I heard •Charlie" Schwab say to the 
ways and means committee last fall 
that the only difference in the cost of 
producing a "ton of steel in America 
and abroad was the difference in the 
wages. As a matter of fact nearly all 
the labor engaged in the making of 
steel billets is unskilled, and the 
average daily wage for tliis in the 
Pennsylvania steel works seems to be 
from about $1.25 to $1.60. In similar 
works in different parts of England 
and .Scotland it is from 90 cents to 
$1.25 f.)r the same work. Ordinary day 
laborers in Birmingham, Eng., for in- 
stance, average $6.S1 a week of fifty- 
three hours. From recent revelations 
in certain Pennsylvania works day 
laborers sometimes get considerably 
less than that In .America. 



The many uses of 

Gold Dost 

If you were to use foi 
each kind of washing, 
cleaning, scouring and 
scrubbing, one of the so- 
called special prepara- 
tions which are made, 
you would have an im- 
posing and expensive 
array of chemicals, wash- 
ing compounds, cleaning 
pastes, etc. 

There is one cleaner 
that can take the place 
of them all, and without 
the need of borax, am- 
m o n i a^ 
kerosene 
or naph- 



tha, and 
that is 
Gold Dust. 




m lUE mm nm 




VIRGINIA ^Ll HAVE 
$50,00d OPERA HOUSE 




SALOON MAN 
BADIJ SHOT 

Joseph Fortune of Ely, For- 
merly of Duluth, Wounded 
in Back. 



Harry Eddy, Switchman, Is 

Under Arrest for Firing 

the Shot. 



Ely, Minn.. Oct. 15.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — Joseph Fortune, a local 
saloon keeper, is in serious condition at 
a local hospital as the result of being 
shot early this morning. Harry Eddy 
an Iron Range switchman, is under ar- 
rest charged with doing the shooting. 

Eddy Is said to have been consider- 
ably the worse for liquor at the time 
but the exact cause for the shooting 
docs not appear to be known. The 
shooting took place in Billy Mack's 
i r was the weapon used. The 
restaurant, about 2 a. m. A 32-callber 
bullet struck Fortune in the back 
where It lodged. He was rushed to 
the old Shlpman hospital and about 
11 o'clock today the surgeons suc- 
ceeded In removing the bullet but the 
outcome of the case If problematical. 

Fortune is 34 years of age and 
single. He formerly resided in Du- 
luth. where he has relatives, and 
worked on the ore docks in West Du- 
luth and other places. 

Eddy is also a single man. 

HIRE ENGINEER 
TO MAKE REPORT 



Question of Eveleth Electric 

Lighting Rates Will Be 

Investigated. 

Eveleth, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a special meeting of 
the Eveleth Commercial club last even- 
ing, the following sub.iects were thor- 
oughly discussed: Grand avenue pav- 
ing, reduction of electric lights, and an 

independent scliool district. 

Many motions and amendments were 
made by the members of the club in 
regard to the form of material that 
the city council should be instructed 
to pave Grand avenue with next spring, 
but all were tabled. The first motion 
was that the city council pave the 
street with crushed rock and tar 
macadam binder, but this was amended, 
and then both motion and amendment 
were tabled, on motion of 1'. E. Dowl- 
ing. 

The next subject ^discussed was elec- 
tric light rates and conditions exist- 
ing at the local plant. After much 
discussion the motion of H. I. Irwin of 
the electric company, that an electric 
englneer.be secured to investigate con- 
•dilions at the local plant and report to 
the club I'.is findings, the expenses to 
be paid by the Home Heating & Elec- 
tric company, was adopted. A com- 
mitte of three, consisting of Albert 
Davy. John Gleason and li. M. Corn- 
wall, was appointed to secure the en- 
gineer. This committee will also In- 
vestigate conditions at other plants 
run by city governments on the range, 
and reptrrt its findings at the next 
regular meeting of tlie club. 

From present indications, as present- 
ed by tlie electric company's officials, 
the local electric rate will be reduced 
to 10 cents If the new heating arrange- 
ment proves successful. 

The changing from a common school 
district to an independent district was 
thoroughly discussed, and tiie prin- 
cipal objecton raised to the present 
form of scliool government here was 
that it was illegal, board of directors 
too small, and election hours inoefinite. 
The opinion of the meeting was for 
an independent district of schools. 

NASHWAUK MAN 
IS BADLY HURT 



Caught Under Steel Range 

That Sfid From His 

Wagon. 

Nashwauk, ^linn., Oct. 15. — (.Special 
to The Heiald.) — Paul Sheff. employed 
as barn boss at the Hawkins mine, was 
seriously injured Wednesday afternoon. 

Mr. Sheff was engaged -n hauling a 
heavy steel range, which began slid- 
ing to the rear end of the wagon, when 
he junii'ed off and tried to push it back 
on. In doing this he slipped and fell, 
the stove fulling upon his back. He 
was taken to his home and medical 
aid given him, and it is expected tliat 
lie will recover, although his back was 
badly bruised. 

Itev. and Mrs. Henry Holme returned 
Wednesday, after an extended visit 
with relatives in Western Minnesota, 
and Rev. Mr. Holme also attended the 
quarterly conference, which was held 
in Duiuth. 

Sheriff T. T. Riley of Grand Rapids 
was a village caller Tlnirsday. 

MARBLE PAYS TRIBUTE 

TO RETIRING PASTOR. 



Marble, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Wednesday evening tlie 
members and friends of Rev. John W, 
Schenck's congregation gathered at the 
home of A. Dockery and united in a 
farewell reception to the pastor. Mr. 
Schenck has been st,ationed liere since 
June 1, and in that time has made 
many warm friends, who regret his 
going away. He has been especially 
zealous In his work, not alone in tiie 
interest of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, but in the spreading of the 
gospel of Jesus Christ, and the prayers 
and good will of l;ls entire congrega- 
tion will go with him to his new field 
at Aurora. Minn. 

The pastor and his family were sub- 
stantially remembered by the members 
of the ladies' aid society, and after re- 
freshments were served the pleasant 
gathering broke up. 

A very plea.^ant feature of the occa- 
sion was the fact that it was also the 
61st birthday of A. Dockery. He was 
the recipient of many congratulations 
and a splendid rocking chair, the chair 
having been presented by tlie members 
of his family. 

Cotton NotCH. 

Cotton, Minn., Oct. l.S. — (Special to 
The Herald,) — Charlie Hoglund was in 



Cotton for a visit Sunday and returned 
to Gilbert Tuesday. 

Theodore Pearson has several inches 
of snow covering his potatoes. 

Fred Nygren and Ed Staner are dig- 
ging rootabagas under three feet of 
snow drifts. 

OLD FISHERMAN 
TO HIS REWARD 



Hans Isaacson, One of Two 

Harbors' Pioneers, 

Is Dead. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Hans Isaacson, 
'he veteran fisherman, who lived for 
years on a point of land near the lo- 
cal lighthouse, following the calling of 
ffshlng, died yesterday afternoon, after 
an illness of about fourteen days of 
lirighfs disease. 

He was a fisherman in Norway, his 
r.ative laiid. and when he came here, 
ui ring the early days of Two Harbors, 
he followed the same calling, with va- 
ried success. 

He was known to about everybody 
here, and there is general regret over 
his death. 

Mr. Isaacson was born at Aliens 
Fjord. Norway, Jan. 6, 1832, and came 
to this country in the year 1881. locat- 
ing In Duluth, and In 1886 moved to 
Two Harbors with his family, where 
he has resided ever since, being one 
of the first settlers in this community. 

Mr. Isaacson is survived by S\x chil- 
dren, all of whom are living, as fol- 
lows: Mrs. Fred D. W. Thlas, Mrs. 
Peter Johnson, Mrs. S. M. Jensen, Mrs. 
John H. Olson, Jacob Isaacson and O. 
H. Isaacson, all residents of this cit.v. 
All of his children were at the bed- 
side at the time of his death. The 
funeral will be held Sunday afternoon 
at 2 o'clock from the Norwegian Lu- 
theran church. Rev. K. P. Carlson of- 
ficiating. Interment will be in the 
family lot in Two Harbors cemetery. 

Y. M. C. A. COMMITTEES. 




Those Who Will Conduct Boys' De- 
partment ill Two Harbors Chosen. 



Oct. 15. — (Spe- 

-The following 

appointed for 

of the local 

association: 

George Mc- 
Harry Daniels, 

.Strand, Albin 



Two Harbors, ISIinn., 
cial to Tlie Herald.) — 
committees have been 
the boys' department 

Young Men's Christian 

Religious — Leo Kain. 
Leod. Howard Mcllray, 
Norman Cleveland. 

Gymnasium — Edwin 
Walstrom, William Hannan. William 
Dwan. Charles Bunham, Elmer Cogley. 

Bible study — Carl Clark, Bert Boy- 
den, Edward Smith, Aster Anderson. 

Camp and outings — John Woodward, 
Ted Sullivan, Leo Brennan, George 
Coleman; C. Bergstrom. 

Music — Archie Pegelow, Louis Cat- 
lin, Allen Clark. Robert Hastings, Matt 
McCurdy. 

Membership — Roy Haugste^n, Russell 
Rose, Clifford Finn, Mllford Brown, 
Richard Erickson. 

Social and entertainment — Donald 
Smith, Ivor Strand, Lester Thompson, 
Archie Grant. Newman Miller. Charles 
Irwin, Georj,"' Hauestein. 



VIRGINIA CONCERT IS 

VOTED BIG SUCCESS. 

Virginia, Minn., Oct. IS. — (.Special to 
The Herald.) — The concert given by 
Mrs. Teckla Form McKinnie and Burt 
McKinnie. assisted by Mrs. A. C. Os- 
born and Mrs. Ruth Trimble King, at 
the Fay opera house, was a decided 



Painful Dyspepsia 

A Form of ludiiirestion CaiL^ed by Gas- 
tric Irritation From I'iMligcsted 
Footl in tlie Stomach. 

No kind of dyspepsia is better 
marked than that known as "painful 
indigestion," and it is also a very com- 
mon affection. Pain, generally of a 
dull character, is felt after meals, and 
along with the pain, .soreness at the 
pit of the stomach often exists, and 
in some cases the soreness is perma- 
nent. The tenderness is commonly 
restricted to a spot in the middle line 
of the body, immediately below the 
breast-bone. 

It often extends upward under the 
bone, which consequently feels sore on 
pressure, or the tendernes.s is felt to- 
ward either side. This tenderness is 
commonly associated with an unpleas- 
ant feeling of heat — "a burning sen- 
sation " — as it is termed by some per- 
sons. There is also a "'gnawing" and 
"dragging," as well as various other 
anomalous sensations complained of 
after taking food, and generally with- 
in an hour after eating. 

As might be supposed the intensity 
of the symptom is proportionate to 
the quantity and quality of the meal. 
When the stomach is empty, a sensa- 
tion of craving or emptiness gives 
most trouble. This often causes a 
false appetite, which, by inducing the 
person to eat heartily aggravates the 
suffering.-:. Thirst generally causes 
much annoyance; heartburn, water- 
brash, acidity, nausea, and headache 
are not infrequent attendant.s. The 
tongue is usually coated and from a 
mere inspection of this organ the con- 
dition of the stomach can often bo 
correctly told. 

. It is a common error with person-^ 
v,'ho suffer from stomach pain caused 
by indigestion and gastric irritation, 
to use such drugs as chlorodyne, Hoff- 
man's Anodyne, and other "pain kill- 
ers" for its relief. Such treatment 
is a great mistake. While these 
drugs afford temporal y relief to the 
dyspeptic pain, thty have no effect 
whatever in removing the cause. 

STTfART'S DYSPEPSIA TABLETS 
remove the cause. By completely 
digesting all the food in the stomach, 
there is no further possibility of the 
occurrence of this disagreeable form 
of dyspepsia with its painful manifes- 
tations, and other concurrent symp- 
toms. All of the irritation of the 
stomach-lining and stomach-nerves 
as the result of the i:ndigested food 
lying in that organ and undergoing 
fermentation and decomposition, is 
quickly done away with. 

But not only is the form of dys- 
pepsia which is accompanied by pain 
cured through the use of these diges- 
tive tablets, but also every other form 
of indigestion, as there are many kinds 
in which stomach pain does not oc- 
cur, but where there are many symp- 
toms equally disagreeable, discomfort- 
ing, disconcerting and discouraging. 

Stuart's >.Dyspepsia Tablets contain, 
in- a highly concentrated form, power- 
ful anti-dyspeptic ingredients, which 
digest rapidly and thoroughly food of 
every kind, including proteids, ni- 
trates, carbo-hydrates, etc. A single 
grain will disintegrate and digest 3,000 
grains of food. 

Purchase a box from your druggist 
at once (prior 50 cents), and get lid 
of the pain, discomfort and other dis- 
agreeable symptoms of dyspep.sia. 
Also send us your name and "address 
for free sample package. Address 
F. A. Stuart Co., 150 Marshall Bldg., 
Marshal], Mich. 



JOHN A. KENNEDY. 

Virginia. Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Supt. John A. Kennedy 
of the Virginia Light & Water com- 
pany Is one of the moving s'Dirlts in the 
proposed opera house to be erected on 
Chestnut street, just west of the Fay 
hotel at a cost of about $5(,000. O. H 
Griggs, manager of the Virginia Llglit 
& Water company, and TliDmas Flan- 
nigan, superintendent of the Onondago 
mine, are working with Mr. Kennedy 
for the success of the enterprise. 



success in every particular. A ca- 
pacity house greeted the participants, 
and every number was thoroughly en- 
joyed. Both Mr. and Mrs. McKinnie 
were in fine voice, and the little drama 
presented by Mrs. Osborn and Mri. 
King was very amusing. 

MUCH LUMBER IS 
BEING SHIPPED 



Total Shipments From Two 

Harbors About 33,000,- 

000 Feet. 

Two Harbors, Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The limiber ship- 
ments from this port up to the present 
time are about 23,2.^0,000 feet, and will 
probably reach about 33.300,000 feet 
before the close of navigation. 

This will be about 50 per cent of the 
best previous record. 

SHORTAGE IS 

GETTING HUGE 

St. Paul Advised That Krem- 

er May Be $50,000 

Behind. 

St. Paul, Minn., Oct. 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The alleged .shortage 
in the accounts of A. A. Krcmer, treas- 
urer of Itasca county, may-^each $50,- 
000 or more. 

A message received by Public Exam- 
iner Anton Schaefer from ?.I. F. Kain. 

at Grand Rapids, the examiner in 
ciiarge, and transmitted to Attorney 
General G. T. Simpson, stated that a 
shortage of nearly $40,000 had been 
located and that the total was still 
climbing. Experts are now at work on 
the books. 

The information received at the 
state capitol Is that Kremer's specu- 
lations are spread over a number of 
years and an examinatR)n of the books, 
it is said, shows that he so altered the 
records that detection for the time was 
almost impossible. 

Instead of disposing of the money In 
riotous living and unwise speculation, 
Kremer is said to have irvested the 
major portion of It wisely In securi- 
ties, and mucli of It can be recovered. 

To date nearly $10,000 of the amount 
alleged to have been stolen has been 
located. 

Kremer, it is reported, placed a lot 
of the money in copper stocks and in- 
vested the balance In farm lands and 
mortgages. It is rumored that other 
persons are involved and they may be 
placed under arrest soon. 

Kremer is out on bail furnished by 
his brothers, but he may be rearrested 
and the amount of his bondfi increased. 
Tlie ball bond demanded was for $10,- 
000. 



SNOWFALL UNUSUALLY 

HEAVY AT VIRGINIA. 



Virginia, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — vSnow again fell here 

last night and the thermometer 

dropped several degrees. During the 

day yesterday It thawed considerably 
and a break for warmer weatlier was 
looked for. About six inches of snow 
now covers the ground and many 
sleighs are being used about, town. 

Samrel Whittier, foremjm of the 
Virginia & Itainy Lake company's new 
mill, is spending a two weeks' vaca- 
tion in Minneapolis. 

Joe Kelly of Minneapolis has been 
secured to "sing the illustrated songs at 
the Orpheum theater. 

J. D. Lament of the Cole & McDon- 
ald Exploration company, has gone to 
Battle Creek, Mich., to take a course 
of treatment at that famous health re- 
sort. 

A temperance lecture will be given 
at the Swedish M. E. church next Sun- 
day evening. Subject, "Gain or Loss." 

Miss Lenora Vail, daughter of Sen- 
ator and Miss P. B- Vail. 1 as entered 
Graham liall at Minneapolis. 

W. A. Reeves, local manager for 
Macbeth & Gardner, has retarned from 
a business trip to Duluth. 



BUCK OCTOBER SNOW. 



Inusiial Conditions Prevail on the 
Iron Range Road. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald. The unusual oc- 
currence of sending their danger out 
so early in the winter occurred this 
week, the Duluth & Iron Range flanger 
being sent to Biwablk to clear the 
tracks, the snow being much worse at 
range points. About fourteen inches Is 
reported having' fallen at K\y, and with 
the heavy wln^ large drifts were 
formed, causing some dela> to trains. 

OLD CONDUCTOR RESIGNS. 



Veteran Employe of Iron Range to 
Look After Mining Business. 

Two Harbors. Minn., Oct. 16. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — J. C. M. Greevy, 
the oldest conductor of the Duluth & 
Iron Range road and for the past sev- 
eral years running the passenger train 
out of Duluth, has resigned to have 
more time to look after hln extensive 
mir.ing interests. 

His resignation will promote Con- 





Buy the Range 
That Pays lor Itself ! 



IT'S 
THE 






IKelStay Satlsf&ctory''8aa«^ 

Built Atr Tight With Rivets— Not 
Fastened Together With Stove 
Bolts and Plastered Up With 
Stove Putty 



If ranges aren't 
supposed to be air- 
tight, why are the 
seams and joints of 
the common steel range plastered up with 
stove putty? Ask this of the man who tries 
to sell you a gray iron and steel range. 

Everyone who has ever used this kind of 
range knows how these puttied seams open 
up, how the range requires more and more 
fuel every month it is burned, and the worst 
of it is, the more fuel it uses, the harder it is 



to get good results. What a contrast to the 
Monarch — built permanently air-tight by hand 
riveting its heavy steel plates to the Malleable 
Iron frames. 

It does its work just as promptly, with just 
as little fuel after many years as when new. 
As stove dealers of long experience we know 
that the Monarch saves the fuel that is wasted 
by other ranges. Give us a chance to con- 
vince YOU that — 

THE MONARCH RANGE ACTUALLY 
PAYS FOR ITSELF. 




20SMMMmQ§:^^ 




Terms 

Sl.OO 

Per Week 



I- 



ductor Frank Fulton to one of the 
passenger runs. 

Virginia. Bridge Club. 

Virginia, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Htrald.) — A bridge club has been 
organized by a number of the young 
ladles of this city and will meet 
throughout the winter at their differ- 
ent homes. The members are the 
Misses Eaton, Pratt, Thompson, De- 
vany. Hicks, Garlock and Helen and 
Fanny Houk. 



Buy KIIIh She Wolf. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Hans Pederson 
brought In a she wolf Thursday, which 
was killed by his son with a shotgun 
on his farm near Silver creek. He re- 
ceived J15 bounty for it. Wolves are 
reported plentiful again this year. 
m 

Library Cuntraot Let. 

Coleraine, Minn., Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The library board has 
awarded the contract for the Carnegie 
library to be built here to A. C^ 
Thomas of Blooming Prairie, who was 
the lowest of eight bidders. Work will 
commence immediately. The building 
will be built of stone and brick, with 
terra cotta trimmings and will cost 
about ri5,000 completed. 

FEAR MOB AT THE VATICAN 



" JOHN ALBERT JOHNSON M EMORIAL FUND 

John Albert Johnson Memorial Fund, Care of The Herald, Duluth: 

Enclosed herewith plea.se find (not to exceed SI), ns a 

c'ontribution to the fund to he used for the erection at the state capitol 
of a monument to John Albert Johnson, late eovernor of Minnesota. 



* (Signed) 



J^-* 



"^ 



PASSES THE $900 MARK 



(Continued from page 1.) 



(Continued from page 1.) 



police and military measures to safe- 
guard the Vatican and save the pope 
from a.ssault. Cardinal Merry del Val 
today personally Imparted imperative 
instructions to the gendarmes and the 
Swiss (juards to watch all entrances to 
the Vatioan, and also the boundaries of 
the Vatican jrardens. 

CorteM Memberw Afrahl. 

Madrid, Oct. 15. — The cortes re- 
opened today despite some opposition 
among; the members of both the sen- 
ate and congress to a sitting at this 
time. 

The Heraldo today, declaring that 
the present government has caused the 
world to point the finger of shame at 
Spain, exhorts Liberals of all shades 
and opinion to rise "against a govern- 
ment which treats as anarchists those 
who do not kneel before the clerical 
specter." 

RcNtorea Money Inilcmnlty. 

The Official Gazette publLshes a de- 
cree restoring the old system which 
permits a payment of money indemnity 
in lieu of military service. 

The Universo Catholic says that it 
is not surprised at the Fe/rer mani- 
festations, which It considers an in- 
dication that "the anarchistic and 
Masonic forces are inspiring a re- 
bellion against all idea of government 
and justice." 

The paper denounces certain Spanish 
newspapers which. It says, are trying 
to provoke disorders by printing ac- 
counts of what has happened abroad. 
Stop Churcb Service. 

Toulon. France, Oct. 15. — During a 
Ferrer demonstration last night the 
rioters invaded the cathedral and 
broke up the evening service. Tlie 
police later drove the disturbers from 
the church and arrested many of them. 
Attack SpaniMli RrabasNy. 

Lisbon, Oct. 15. — Tlie police today 
frustrated an attack upon the Span- 
ish embassy by Ferrer sympathizers. 
The officers charged upon the rioters 
and revolver shots were exchanged, 
though without serious Injury to any- 
one. 

The Spanish consuls throughout 
Portugal are being guarded. The 
headquarters of Republican clubs are 
displaying flags at half mast. 



For Your Hair 

Here Are Facts We Want 
You to Prove at Our Risk. 

Marvelous as It may seem, Rexall 
"93" Hair Tonic has grown hair on 
heads that were once bald. Of course 
it is understood that in none of these 
cases were the hair roots dead nor 
had the scalp taken on a glazed, shiny 
appearance. 

When the roots of the hair are en- 
tirely dead and the pores of the scalp 
are glazed over, we do not believe 
that anything can restore hair growth. 

When Rexall "93" Hair Tonic will 
do as above stated, it Is not strange 
that .we liave such great faith In it 
and that we claim It will prevent bald- 
ness when used In time. It acts scien- 
tifically, destroying the germs which 
are usually responsible for baldness. 
It penetrates to the roots of the hair, 
stimulating and nourishing them. It is 
a most pleasant toilet necessity, is 
delicately perfumed and will not gum 
nor permanently stain the hair. 

We want you to get a bottle of 
Rexall "93" Hair Tonic and use It as 
directed. If it does not relieve scalp 
irritation, remove dandruff, prevent 
the hair from falling out and promote 
an increased growth of hair and In 
every way give entire satisfaction. 
.«imply come back and tell us and 
without question or formality we will 
hand back to you every penny you 
paid us for it. 

We lend our endorsement to Rexall 
"93" Hair Tonic and sell it on this 
guarantee, because we believe it Is the 
best hair tonic ever discovered. It 
comes In two sizes, prices 50 cents and 
$1.00. Remember you can obtain it 
only at our store. — The Rej^all Store. 
E. iM. Tredway. 



and there is one today from a former 
Duluthlan now residing in the Canad- 
ian Northwest. 

W. C. Smith of Schroeder, Cook 
county, lias sent In $5, representing 
himself and four other contributors. 

R. \j. :Myrick of Davidson, Sask., 
sends %\ and writes as follows: 

"I have been up here in the North- 
west for three or four years and had 
the pleasure of voting for Governor 
Johnson only once. I am sorry to say 
that I heard him speak only once, but 
we have taken Tlie Herald ever since 
we left Duluth, and. of course, have 
read a great deal regarding him." 

R. Lagerstron, a musical director at 
St. Peter, Minn., writes: "In honor of 
our beloved governor, John A. Johnson, 
I liave in my liumble way tried to give 
liim a tribute in a musical composi- 
tion entitled 'In Memoriam.' It is a 
true picture of his last days, death and 
funeral. I also introduced In the .same 
his favorite songs 'Nearer. My God, to 
Thee,' and 'Lead, Kindly Light." " 

The family of George H. Crosbv is 
represented in today's list by a contri- 
bution of $1 from each. This plan will 
probably be followed by many more 
families in Duluth who desire to show 
the esteem In which they held the late 
governor. 

The Herald would impress upon all 
who desire to contribute to the me- 
morial fund the necessity of carrying 
out their Intentions without further 
delay. The state commission is 
anxious to close the fund on or about 
Nov. 1 and to be assured of at least 
$25,000, in order to provide an appro- 
priate memorial. This leaves but a 
short time in which to complete the 
fund. Only a few Duluth lodges and 
societies havfe yet been heard from. No 
doubt many intend to make contribu- 
tions to the fund and they should 
take action at once. The only limit 
on contributions by these societies is 
that the total amount each gives 
shall not exceed $1 for each member 
of the society. 

Ll8t of ContrlbutorH. 
Following Is the list of contributions 
to the fund received by The Herald up 
to date: 

Previously acknowledged % 862.60 

August Anderson $1.00 H. W. ChcaJlc $1.00 

It. L. Myrick, UavUl- K. L. Cross, B.ir- 

son, Sask 1.00; uum, Minn 1.00 

P. K. UigUniark 1.00 L. Hannctt, Bc- 

1.00 i mldji, Minn 

l.fiO Henrj' Jolinscn. 
1.00 Kli.od»ood. Minn. 
1.00 Knima J. Johnsmi, 

1». M. Morrison 1.00 1 Floodwood, Minn. 

K. F. Iltllir 1.00 .4ntcn Gri.nscth 

A. Uuackeubush 1.00 John Olson 1.00 

C. v. Hansen 1.00 CaniiUe Polrier 1.00 

C. J. Engstrom 1.00 George H. Crusby 1.00 

K. Hedenbtrg 1.00 Mrs. Geo. H. Oroiby l.OO 

C. L. Gjodell 1.00 Howard Crosby 1.00 

William Prowse. Margaret Crosby 1.00 

Aurora. Minn 1.00 W. C. Smith, 

Henry Tomfohr, Chls- | Schroeder, Minn.. 1.00 

holm, Minn 1.00 ,0. A. Smith, 

Henry Tomfohr, ChJs- i Sclirocder, Minn.. 1.00 

holm. Minn 1.00 'Emli Johnson, 

n. G. Borland 1.00' Si-hrocdcr, Minn.. 1.00 

Mary .K. Jlorland... 1.00 Ban Prudham. 

Kuth G. Borland 1.00! .Si hroeder. Minn.. 1.00 

Vlitor Nordstrom, Peter Strand, 

Virginia, Minn 1.00 Sthroeder. Minn.. 1.00 

» 

WILL RETURN BALANCE 

TO THE CONTRIBUTORS 



dividuals; $1,234.95 for furniture and 
household goods and $3,007.40 for sup- 
plies for the winter. The headquarters 
expense was $530. 

These totals will be given out In de- 
tail later. Mayor Haven is preparing, 
an itemized account, which will be In 
shape within a few days. 

The members of the committee pres- 
ent at the meeting last night were 
Mayor Haven, chairman; H. M. Pey- 
ton, treasurer: A. L. Ordean and Judge 
Martin Hughes, the range representa- 
tive. 



THIRTY KILLED IN STORM 
IN THE CENTRAL SOLTK 



(Continued from page 1.) 



George Highmark. . 
T. L. Higlimark... 
John Peterson .... 
G. A. Gustafsin.. 



1.00 

1.00 

1.00 
1.00 



fire following the passage of the storm,, 
continuing the work oi destruction. 

The last dispatches from Denmark 
told of the fire gradually burning it- 
self out. 

At Whiteville a factory and church- 
building were wrecked. 

At Buford station the Louis/ille & 
Nashville depot and freight buildings 
V. ere dertroyed and several othei struc- 
tures badly damaged. 

Near Mulberry the dwelling and farm 
houses .on the plantation of Robert. 
Mattow were demolished. 

At Wartrace, a negro settlement, 
the town was le.'eled. 

Gibson, Stanton, Dvi rsburg and Mer- 
cer are other towns »n Tennessee re- 
ported damaged. 



i 



■} 



Hail Riu UN OranscH. 

Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 15. — At Riverdale, 
sixteen miles south of Atlanta one 
woman was killed and nineteen other 
persons were injured In last night's 
storm. The path of the storm was 
one-fourth of a mile wide. 

Reports from Rome, Ga., indicate that 
the storm damage there will reach for 
into the thousands. Hail stones the 
i-ize of oranges are reported. The crops 
liiroughout that section are said to he 
almost totally destroved. 



liivcMtock liluivn Away. 

Cartersville, Ga.. Oct. K..— One dead 
and a property loss estimated at $50,000 
is the result of the tornado-iike storm 
which swept this section last night. 
Much - livestock is reported blown 
away.' 



*^- ^) ili ** :^ tfJ l fit*t***t**tt**tt* 



(Continued from page 1.) 



shore sufferers got $6,628.51 and an 
Isolated farmer on the Seville road was 
given $50. 

The matter has been hanging fire for 
several months. Mayor Haven, chair- 
nan of the relief committee, has en- 
deavored several times to get a final 
report from the Chisholm committee, 
and was unable to take any definite 
action until he received word that no 
further funds will be needed there. 

The mayor has not had the handling 
of any of the funds, but has kept track 
of the expenditures. Last night when 
he and Treasurer H. M. Peyton com- 
pared notes it was found that onl.v a 
difference of 30 cents existed between 
their respective totals. 

At Chisholm $2,791.87 was spent for 
emergency relief; $216.80 for prepar- 
ing records; $278.86 for health meas- 
ures; $17,108.03 for building eighty- 
seven houses; $3,679.91 for material to 
individuals; $14,176.17 for furniture 
and household goods; $2,435 for cash 
awards; $239.73 for relief to Individ- 
uals and $391.32 for relief over the 
winter. 

The expense of the Duluth headquar- 
ters was $233.49 and the expenses of 
the chairman, allowed last night, 
amounted to $143.50. 

On the north shore $55.88 was spent 
for emergency relief; $1,396.17 for 
nine houses; J404.41 for lumber to in- 



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Restorative 

Treatment for 
Nervous Men 

Coming from a source of un- 
questioned authority on the ail- 
ments of men it is presumed to 
be infallible, while the profession 
generally endorse the inKredl- 
ents and prescribe them In many 
different forms of various dis- 
eases. The following formula is 
highly efficient in quickly re- 
storing in nervous exhaustion, 
melancholia, anxiety, timidity in 
venturing dizziness, heart palpi- 
tation, trembling limbs, insom- 
nia, thinness, cold extremities, 
tired-allin feeling and general 
inability to do those natural and 
rational acts upon which de- 
pends a man's success and hau- 
piness in social and every-day 
life. 

The instructions for mixing 
at home secretly so that no em- 
barrassment may be felt, are as 
follows: First get three ounces 
of syrup sarsaparlUa compound 
and one ounce comr>ound fluid 
balmwort; mix and let stand two 
hours. Then add one ounce com- 
pound essence cardiol and one 
ounce tincture cadomene com- 
pound (not cardamom), and 
mix all together. The directions 
are to take one teaspoonful after 
each meal and one when retir- 
ing, until bounding health and 
full strength are restored. Even 
a few weeks will witness most 
wonderful results. 

Astonishing nervous force and 
equilibrium follow the treat- 
ment, no matter how serious the 
case. 

This contains no opiates what- 
ever and may also be used by 
women who suffer with their 
nerves with absolute certainty of 
prompt and lasting benefits. 



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■ >- ■ ,ii « . ' 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY,_ OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



MANY AID IN SEARCH FOR B( 
OF VICTIMS OF OVERLOADEl 



r9' 



GET INTO 
PROSPERITY'S 

WAGON 



Dress well, look happy and 
prosperous,forget all about hard 
times, and- -BOOST ! 
You can aford to this 
season. It is really 
your duty to do so, be- 
cause the indiyiduars 
attitude toward pros- 
'perity is the most im- 
portant (actor in bring- 
ing it about. 

We're doing it. Buy- 
ing more goods, better 
goods, greater varieties 
than ever. Opening up 
\UM/ M/i more and more new 

'l^( vWhl'xi^ stores. Giving all the ad- 
vantages of liberal credit to 
more and more people every 
day that we live, h pays us, and it will pay 
you. Think it over, and get into action. 

MENTER & oOM 
HOSENBl'^CO. 

122 E. Superior Street 

Open Saturday Evenings Until 10:30 



*m 




mm 



'^^»0j 



— Plvut b by McKciiiie. 

DRAGGING THE NORTHERN PACIFIC SLIP. 



WANT BALM 
FOR jNJURIES 

Two Personal Injury Suits 

Resulting From Alleged 

Assaults. 

Political Quarrel Grew Heated 

Eveleth Hotel Man 

Is Sued. 



Peterson, but claims that Peterson 
broke in the door of a room occupied 
bv a woman and frightened her. He 
said when Peterson refused to get out 
of the house, lie dragged him out of 
bed and hit him. 

The suit of Thomas Purcell against 
the Wisconsin Central Hallway com- 
pany for $10,000 for personal injuries, 
which was on trial before Judge 
Hughes, was adjourned this morning 
until next Wednesday afternoon at 2 
o'clock. The mother of W. G. Starkey. 
one of the jurors, died last night and 
Mr. Starkey was not able to be pres- 
ent. The attorneys decided to ask 
an adjournment until after the 
funeral. 



FIELD AGENT fSiE^o^i iEw 



IN DEirni NOW READY 




If a few more table guests would 
make it profitable for you to keep 
boarders, then you have business for 
a Herald want ad. 



Representative of National 
Society of Associated Chari- 
ties Visits City. 

Will Investigate the Condi- 
tions Here and Make 
a Report. 

















r 


J 


















, 




1 











Two personal injury cases growing 
out of alleged assaults are on trial in 
district court today. Before Judge 
Dibell. the suit of A. J. Meagher 
against M. N. Triplett for $5,000 dam- 
ages. Is being heard, and before Judge 
Cant. Per Peterson's suit against Mar- 
shall Johnson for $1,000 damages is 
on trial. _ ..... .. 

Meagher and Triplett both live at 
Floodwoo<1 and the assault, out of 
which the suit arises, is alleged to 
have been the result nf p..litioai dli- 
ferences. Meagher claims that Trip- 
lett hit him on the head with an ax. 
Triplett claims he only hit Meagher 
with the handle of the ax and that 
Meagher was the aggressor in the 

fighL , ,, 

Per Peterson, who is a farmer liv- 
ing at Zim. is suing Marshall Johnson, 
proprietor of an Evel.vth hotel, for an 
assault he claims Johnson committed 
on him on the night of Nov. 24, 1908. 
while he was a guest at the hotel. He 
claims that Johnson entered his room, 
dragged him from bed, and beat him 
without an explanation or cause. 
Johnson admits that he assaulted 



Stewart Heaters 

Will Save Fuel 

They have made good 
right here in Duluth. 

Don't buy a No-Name 
heater — one that the maker 
is ashamed of, when you can 
buy a 

STEWART FOR $25.00. 
TERMS, $1.00 PER WEEK 




The Greatest of All Glove Sales 

Occurs tomorrow. Ladie.s' new $2.i10 

Glace MousQuetaire Kid Gloves for 

$1. and Ladies" new $1.25 White Kid 

Gluve.-- for 89c ^%p 

Saturday only T^TT . ..» A 

at 




<.UOVE:'r 



26 West S^uperlor Street. 



HEARS FROM THE 
DEPARTMENTS 

Christian Church Will Have 

Big Day of Meeting 

Saturday. 

Pittsburg. Oct. 15. — The work of the 

international centennial and convention 

of tlie L)isctj>les of Christ (Cliristian 

cliurch^ today centered about tlie 

American temperance board, the board 
of ministerial relief, churcli extension, 
the Ministerial association, the Na- 
tional Benevolent association and the 
Christian Endeavor. 

Se.ssions were held in the Carnegie 
institut'^ and at the Duquesne gard- 
ens. 

National Secretary C. Muckley of 
Kan.sas City made the report for the 
board of church extension. The total 
receipts lur the last year were |197,- 
252. There was a gain in new re- 
ceipts oi 120,162, and a gain of 121 
ceii-riouling churches. 

Addres.ses were ii ade by delegates 
from all parts of the world, congratulat- 
ing th©' various deparlment.s of the 
church for the good work being accom- 
plished. Tomorrow the special centen- 
nial program wlU be carried out. and 
it is expected to be the red letter day 
of the convention. 

CONVICT SUYER 
OF BLACK HANDER 

Antonio Bova Principal in SL 

Paul KiDing Gets Off 

Easy. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Oct. 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Antonio Bova. who 
killed Vincenzea MegYia on East Sev- 
enth street on a Sunday afternoon last 
April, was found guilty of manslaugh- 
ter in the first degree in the liamsey 
county district court here today. 

There was some mystery connected 
v/ith the killing. One of the important 
witnesses disappeared after he had 
once voluntarily appeared for the state. 
and reports of Black Hand infiuence 
were brought into the case on this ac- 
count. 

Bova's defense was that Megna tried 
to levy on him, and that Megna 
claimed to be a member of the Black 
Hand. 



Francis H. McLean, field agent of 
the National Society of • Associated 
Charities, reached the city today and 
at once began an investigation of the 
conditions in older that he may be in- 
formed of the local situation when he 
meets with the board of directors of 
the Duluth society Monday. 

Mr. McLean was not prepared to 
talk of Duluth matters yet, but had 
several suggestions and ideas which 
have been found valuable in many 
other cities throughout the country. 
He said that Duluth is growing at 
a rapid rate and that now is the time 
to begin regulating charities and 
starting tne work characteristic of 
most of the associated charities' or- 
ganizations. He asserted that the 
work is not only to take care of the 
poor sysiematically. but to look Into 
social and moral conditions. In some 
places he says that the associated 
charitie.s keeps as close track of 
civic matters as the commercial clubs. 
He thought that one of the first 
steps should be to secure ordinances 
making it possible for the society to 
maintain sanitary conditions In all 
sections of the city, particularly 
overcrowding Is liable to result. He 
explained that the older a city be- 
comes the greater is the tendency for 
more families to pack into smaller 
space The bullding.s become foul, the, 
ventilation i.s poor and the field for 
the spread of disease Is fertilized ac- 
corilinglv. He thinks that such mat- 
ters can" best be remedied by the as- 
sociated charities aided by necessary 
legislation from the city council. 

H" thought it would be wise If dele- 
gates <'rom the different charitable so- 
cieties in the city met with the of- 
ficers or active agents of the asso- 
ciated charities at lease once a month 
to discuss the work that is being done. 
His idea is that such delegates should 
be entirely separate from the board of 
directors, upon whom will fall the 
chief burden of supplying the 
finances. 

Mr McLean was emphatic in the 
statement that a trained man should 
he employed by the society If efficient 
results are to be obtained. He said 
that experience has proved that where 
men. who have not been previously 
engaged in the work are put at the 
helm, results are lacking. He stated 
that these societies generally stay at 
about the same place they started, 
making little or no headway. 



FORTRAINS 

Depot Only Part of the Soo 
Terminals Yet Un- 
finished. 

Tunnel Completed-Trains 

May Run to Duluth 

By Jan. 1. 



C. N. Kalk, chief engineer of the 
Chicago division of the Soo railroad, 
was here yesterday inspecting the last 
few details in connectior. with the 
completion of the subway entrance to 
the depot. 

The tunnel was finished yesterday, 
with the exception to a £ev^ minor de- 
tails of the outside finishing:. The track 
Is laid through the subwE.y, and the 
ballasting was completed yesterday. 
The inside concrete work is also com- 
pleted, and the inspection of Mr. Kalk 
yesterday completes the responsibility 
of the engineers with the »?uilding of 
the underground entrance to tlie city. 

With the completion of the subway, 
work was started the day before yes- 
terday on the roundhoufie between 
Twentieth and Twenty-first avenues 
west. It Is the idea to back the trains 
out of the subway and have the engine 
turned at the turntable in the coach 
yards. Grading has been started in the 
coach yards, in the vlcinltj of Garfield 
avenue, and track-laying will begin 
there some time this fall. 

The only obstacle that prevents 
trains being run into the train yards 
here is the completion of the passen- 
ger depot and the laying of tracks In 
the depot yard. Grading for the track- 
laving has been started in the depot 
yards, and track-laying Is due to begin 
within a couple of weeks. 

The contract on the dei^ot calls for 
its completion some time next month. 
With the early completion of the 
track-laying both in the coach yard, 
near Garfield avenue, and the depot 
vard, between Sixth and Seventh ave- 
nues west, it is believed that trains 
will be operated into the Duluth depot 
before the first of the yetir. 

J. C. MeGi'eevy Resigns. 

.1. C. McGreevy, for ever twenty 
vears a passenger conductor on the 
Duluth, Missabe & Northern railway, 
has resigned to enter the mining busi- 
ness Mr. McGreevy will become the 
manager of the Roy Development com- 
panv, holding a tract of iron lands In 
the 'vicinity of Tower. 





If Palpitation, 

Stuffy Breathing 

or other signs show, its 
risky to keep on with 
coffee. 

POSTUM 

10 days makes tilings dear. 

"There's a Reason" 



MAY RECOVER. 




FROM INJURIES 



Edith Olson, the 6-year-old daughter 
of Olaf Olson, 1824 Water, street, who 
was struck by a Duluth 8: Iron Range 
train Saturday night at the Sixteenth 
avenue east crossing, will probably re- 
cover. The authorities £tt St. Luke's 
hospital say that she is doing well. 
She was waiting on the crossing to 
catch a glimpse of her father, a brake- 
man, when hit by the engine. For a 
time It was feared that she would not 
recover. 



D. E. H.. O.t I?. W.9- 




Clolh*n| Os 






Knapp-Felt Hats, 

Barker 2 for 25c 
Collars 

Waterhouse Ties, 

Reynier Gloves, 

Ware Canes, 

Manhattan Shirts 

Kneipp Linen 

Underwear, 

Hanan Shoes, 




/ 



— H 



Bi.^ 



Three Good Ones— 
Colutnbia $3 Hats. 
Columbia $1 Shirts. 
Colutnbia $3.50 Shoes. 



Sampeck 
Clothes for 
Boys and 
Young Men. 



We have no difficulty disposing of our higher priced 

clothes. The men who buv $25, $30 or $35 Suits or $40 Overcoats of us know 
what they are about. The/ve had their appointments and disappomtments with 
tailors— With real ones as well as with the ones who are tailors m name only 
They know what the Stein-Bloch and Sincerity labels in Columbia Clothes stand 

for. 

But how few of those who can afford only a 

$ 1 5 Suit and Coat 

are wise to the game. How few escape the pitfall set by the house-to-house can- 
vasser bv the wily advertisements of the bankruptcer or by the ten-per-cent-ott- 
becaus'e-you-are-it merchant ? Why is a $15 Suit ? Often, because it is not. 

Clothes-buying, Hke that of jewelry, is largely a matter of confidence in your 
dealers honesty. At a One-Price Store with the unsullied Columbia reputation 
you are likely to get the best for vour fifteen dollars. Take a look at $lo Suits and 
Ovrcoats in every store on Superior street— then examine ours. We can show you. 
Most all of our $15 Suits are the reliable Sincerity Make. 



■ ^ ■ fc ^a^j* 



The 

Columbia 
Corner. 



THE COLUMBIA 



At Third Avenue West 



I The 
j Columbia 
1 Corner 















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J I M y i W 1 1 t If t i j| i ) II' f y ■ I ■! >«■ 



I 



Saturday 

Evening 

Special! 





Value 
25c 

stands 7 lo 
9 in. Tall. 



These water or milk Jugs are 
fashioned in a good grade earthen- 
ware, glazed and decorated in daisy and tulip designs. Sold usually 
I at about 25c, not often for any less. On sale in our basement Satur- 
I day evening, beginning at 7:30, for only 7 cents each. One to a cus- 
■ tonier. No 'phone orders. 



^■if 



1^ 



Cornet Base Burners 

$33.00 




$39.00 
$44.00 

In Medium Sizes. 

You don't need to pay a small 
fortune for a heater if you don't 
want to. 

Of course, we strongly advise 
a Moore or a Radiant Estate for 
beauty and lasting qualities. But 
for those who want a good, 
serviceable heater at about the 
above figures, we can deliver 
the goods. 

NFOR WOOD AND COAL. 

we have the popular "round 
oak" stoves at easy prices. 
Drop in and look them over. 
Easy payments, too. 





.iecna Avenue ii,a»» and :»iipcri r Mreei 





BODY DRIFTED 

EIGHT MILES 



The body of Thomas Hueston. 55 
years old, who was drowned nearly 
two weeks ago in Alden lake, while 
on a drive for the CloQuei Tie 8t Post 
company, was found yesterday after- 
noon In Island lake, about eight miles 
from the place he lost his life. 

The two lakes are connected by a 
river, and the body was washed from 
one into the other. Hueston's com- 
panions made a heroic effort to rescue 
him as he shot thruuph the dam, ato/? 
which they were working. One of them 
walked thirty miles into the city to 
notify the authorities of his death. 

Durkan & Crawford have sent a 
man after the body, which will prob- 
ably reach the city some time this 
evening. The funeral will take place 



tomorrow, and interment will be in 
Rorest Hill cemetery. 

Hueston's folks are living in C.^riada, 
witii the exception of one son, who is 
in Bemidji. He hos been around this 
part of the countiv for many years. 

AHACKED BY TURTLE. 



Woman Has Skirt and Sleeve of 
Waist Tom Off. 

Philadelphia. Oct. 15.— When Mrs. 
Anna Dumond of Front and Federal 
streets heard a strange shuffling noise 
In her back shed, she Investigated and 
was attacted by a big .350-pound sea 
turtle that her husband had been given 
and had brought home without telling 
her. The turtle caught her skirt in 
its jaws and tore it off, and when Mrs. 
Dumond tried to regain it the turtle 
tore a sleeve out of her waist. Her 
husband then went to her aid with a 
piece of four-inch plank, which the 
turtle bit in two before It was sub- 
dued. 



NEW YOR K STYL ES 
iTDULUTH! 



Why go or send orders to New York for Shoes? 
We carry the leading Eastern styles in our store, and 
give you the advantage of seeing Shoes and having them 
fitted. Fastidious dressers wear the GARSIDE 
SHOES. We also carry the Lattman, Griffin & White, 
and famous Pinkus Shoes. 

Courteous salesmen always willing to show our 
Shoes. We extend a cr dial invitation to our Boot Shop. 

W. & L SHOE STORE, 

218 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



ANXIETY FELT CONCERNING 
MANY OVERDUE VESSEI5 



Fifty Freighters Anchored at 
Shelter Behind White- 
fish Point. 



Since Leaving Duluth Pere 

Marquette Has Not Been 

Heard From. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Oct. 15. — 
(b'pecial to The Herald.)— With the 
.sl.\tli day of the gale which has swept 
over the upper lakes with unabated 
lit rceness comes Increased anxiety con- 
cerning a large number of vessels 
\vl ich are reported several days over- 
due. 

This morning there were over fifty 
freighters anchored in shelter behind 
Wliitefi.sh point. The only one to ven- 
ture out was the Juniata. A Jleet of 
about fortv got away into Lake Huron 
tl is morning from Detour. 

With vessels lying in shelter at 
'very available neck, it is practically 
impossible to give an entire list of 
tliose overdue. The big Wolvin is 
ab )Ut four d.i\b overdue, and the own- 
ers are e-xtremely anxious. 

Fear for the safety of the C. S. He- 
bard was relieved last night, when she 
passed down. The W. E. Corey is 
overdue, but she was reported at an- 
chor, witii a dozen ethers, in Thunder 
bav last Tuesday. 

The Pere Marquette No. 5 left Du- 
luth twenty-four hours ahead ot the 
('onomaugh, which pa( sed down yes- 
t( rday. She is not yet reported. 

The barge Martha and her steamer 
are overdue. A number are believed 
to be anchored along the north shore 
of Lake Superior. They head along 
tlie shore from Duluth until it is nec- 
essary to head southeast across the 
lake. The wheel of the C. R. Crowe 
became entangled in a body chain off 
Iriich point last night. She drifted 
and was finally picked up by the tug 
C. D. Tho.mpson. She was brought to 
the Soo. 



INCOMING BOATS 
ARE DEUYED 



Sheltering Points Hold Ves- 
sels and Arrivals Are 
Very Few. 

As a result of the fierce gale that 
raged over Lake Superior during three 
days of the past week, incoming boats 
are greatly delayed and it is expected 
that a blockade will result at the Head 
of the Lakes. 

Many of the boats have sheltered at 
various points on the lake and are now 
bound for the port of Duluth. The 
Lily pond has slieltered a number of 
tlie boats as has the harbor at Wliite- 
fish point. 

The arrivals have been very few dur- 
ing tlie past three or four days and the 
boats that have come in have been 
quickly loaded and ser.t on tlieir way. 



Cure Yourseif With 
2c Turkish Bath 



RiMiiarknitle Kenults of Ilobiuson 
"Thfrmnr' for Rheuinatlsni, Ner- 
vous Breakdown, Kiduey 
Trouble, «<kiu and Otber 
. DiMeaNi'H. 



DoeM What No Drug on Earth Can Do. 





The results produced by a Robinson 
"Thermal" Bath inside of 30 minutes 
are almost beyond belief. Pliysicians 
everywhere are changing from drugs 
to thermal baths in the treatment of 
many diseases 

It has been found for instance, in 
the case of rheumatism, that uric acid 
in the blood can be extracted from the 
system completely in a few days' time. 

Eczema can be completely cured 
within a week. 

After one or two thermal baths, ner- 
vous wrecks find the change to 
strength apd vigor hard to realize. 

Similar results are obtained in 
cases of kidney trouble, neuralgia, 
pimples, all skin diseases, throat and 
lung trouble, insomnia, constipation, 
lumbago and bad colds. 

It is now possible for any man or 
woman to have Robinson Thermal 
batbs at home with hardlv anv tf..i' '« 
at all, and at a cost of only a few cenxs 

^Vllatever your (li.«euse ur aihuo ■!, 
get a Robinson Thermal Bath Cabinet, 
and you will not only cure yourself 
quickly, but realize as you never did 
before, what real vigor and health are. 

The Robinson Thermal Bath Cabinets 
are on exhibition and for sale in Du- 
luth at A. E. Swedberg, White Swan 
Drug Co.. L. P. Mattlx (2 stores), W. A. 
.Abbett (3 stores), A. C. Le Richieux c3 
stores), A. J. Lindgren, West Dululh, 
and In Superior, Wis., at the Holmberg 
Drug Co.. H. J. Cameron, and Red 
Cross Pharmacy. ^ 

Go and examine them. Ask the dealer r.lso for 
the book of the rentury. "The Phllosopliy of Health 
and Beauty," price two dollars, but given away fr*e 
fir a limJtetl time. If you caun.jt go and 8ee these 
wonderful lahlnets send your name and address to 
t!ie IJoblnson Mfg. Co.. Suite 16, Rnowflake UUig., 
Toledo, Oliio. for full illustrated InformaUun, free. 



The docks are hcfw laying Idle and very 
few boats are under the fipouts at the 
grain elevators. 

This morning the delayed boats that 
had sheltered at Port Artl ur and other 
nearby ports began to straggle in. 
Captains report that the v/ind was one 
of the heaviest in years, and not a few 
of them were surprised that there were 
not more accidents. 



ATHABASCA IS 
HARD AGROUND 



Canadian Steamer on Rocky 

Ledge Near Bruce 

Peninsula. 

Owen Sound, Oni., Oct. 15. — Word 
was received here yesterday that the 
Canadian Pacific .steamer Athabasca is 
hard aground off Flowerj)ot island, a 
small rocky ledge near the nortli end 
of Bruce peninsula. The main part of 
the ship is alloat In about fifteen 
fathoms of water. The crew of fifty- 
six men and a small passenger list, 
probably less than lialf a dozen people, 
are still on board. The Assinaboia, 
from which the wreck was sighted, 
ran close to the shore, but owing to the 
lieavy sea was unable to get close 
enough for a rescue. Tugs were dis- 
patched to the scene of the wreck. 

The Athabasca is one of the finest 
passenger and freight-carrying steam- 
ers on the Great Lakes. She is 270 feet 
long and was built on the Clyde in 
1885. Slie was under comn'.and of Capt. 
Alexander Brown. 



The Sault Passages. 



Sault 
(Special 
Mullen, 
Snyder, 



Ste. Marie, Mich., Oct. 15. — 
to The Herald.)— Up Friday: 
Osborne, 2 a. m. ; P. Minch, 
7; lianney. Sonoma, 8; Besse- 
mer, Pontiac, 9; W. G. Kerr, Luzon, 
9:30; Alva, 10; Gates, Centurion, Scot- 
tish Hero, Shaughnessy, 10:30. Down: 
Lake Shore, Boland, 3 a. m. ; H. W. 
Smith, 4; Crowe, 6; Cornelius, 8:30; 
Ward Ames, Huronic, 10 , Edenborn, 
10:30. 

Up Thursday: W. W. Brown. Ball 
Brothers. 10:30 a. m.; Siemens, Manila, 
Hemlock, Maruba, Morley, Algonquin, 
noon; Truesdale, 1 p. m. ; .Shaw. La 
Salle, Fairbaiin, .Smeaton, 1:30; Gilbert, 
2; Fla.gg, W^arriner, Stern, 3; Empress, 
Midland, 3:30; Denmark, 4; Watt, 5; 
Henry Smith. Favorite, 6; Donnacona, 
Walker, Nottingham, 6:30; Zenith Citv, 
Rees, 7:30; Holden, 10; Sullivan, 10:30; 
Bartow, 11; Saronic, Penobscot, Stein- 
brenner. midnight. Dow-n: Lyman 
Smith, 11:30 a. m.; Conemaugh, Renn- 
selaer, 12:30 p. m.; Bunsen, Imperial 
and oil barges, 1; Colborn, Mataafa, 
1:30; Corrigan, HolmeS, 2:30; Superior, 
3:30; Hebard, 9; J. C. Wallace, 10; 
Sierra, 10:30; H. H. Rogers, 11:30. 



Port of Duluth. 



Arrivals — D. R. Hanna, light for ore; 
New York, light for grain; Mariska, D. 
G. Kerr, coal. . 

Departures — D. M. Whitney, Mari- 
posa, Roebling, Sierra, Jchn Sherwln, 
Socapa, Loftus Cuddy, I,. C. Waldo, 
Morgan. Adriatic, D. R. Hanna, ore; 
Tuxbury. ' Redfern, Bradley, Woolsen, 
Kalkaska, lumber; A. E. Stewart, grain; 
W. R. Woodford, Umbria, grain: Tio- 
nesta. Northern Wave, merchandise. 



AS TAME AS 
NEW ENGLAND 

Arizona No Longer Furnishes 

Material for Comic 

Papers. 

Anti-Gambling Laws Have 
Put an End to Law- 
lessness. 



Anti-gambling laws have worked a 
revolution in the mode ol life of the 
territory of Arizona, and tliat once 
wild and woolly home of lawlessness 
is as tame and orderly as any little 
New England village that has slum- 
bered peacefully these many years un- 
der the unromantlc rule of the blue 
laws. 

At least this is the staVe of Charles 
Llndstrom. a large lumber operator of 
Williams, Ariz., who is an the Spald- 
ing. Not satisfied with the stamping 
out of gambling and all games of 
chance, Mr. Llndstrom says the people 
of the territory are bent on securing^ 
prohibition laws. 

Three years ago, Mr. Llndstrom 
says, the vice In the average town of 
Arizona was something jnbelievable. 
There was gambling, drlnidng, carous- 
ing, and vice of the most llagrant sort. 
Women were employed In the saloons, 
and so eager were miners, woodsmen 
or cowboys to frequent tie gambling 
halls that often the game was brought 
out into the middle of tie street so 
more could play. 

Now, according to the .-statement of 
Mr. Llndstrom, you cannot even shake 
dice in Arizona. In this regard, Mr. 
Llndstrom says, the citizens of Duluth 
have far more freedom than the citi- 
zens of the onlce wild and carefree 
territory of Arizona. 

If you bet on the turn of a card In 
Arizona, or If you shake the sin- 
crossed dice, even for a stogie, two- 
for-a-nlckel brand, you are liable to 
instant arrest, according to the state- 
ment of the Arizona lumber operator. 

"Business in the territory has in 
creased wonderfully the past three 
months, and big operations, both in 
the mineral and timber sections of the 
territory, have been the result," says 
Mr. Lindstrom. 

"Money is being invested In mineral 
holdings, and more timber is being cut 
right now than at any thue since the 
lumber slump reduced operations in 
the West. Labor scarcity is one of 
the conditions that is bothering lum- 
ber operators. 

"Mexican labor is used a great deal 
by the largest operators. The Mexi- 
can is lazy and will not work unless 
he Is under the constant surveillance 
of a white man. I am here getting 
laborers for ouf timber operations, 
and there is a constant demand for 
white labor In the territory." 

According to I.,lndstrom, Arizona 
will have statehood before another 
year. Why Arizona has fought so 
strenuously against Joining with New 
Mexico and becoming a state, is ex- 
plained by Mr. Llndstrom, by saying 
that Mexican customs predominate In 



BM^m'S 



BETTER GOODS at BETTER PRICES 

Buy Your Stove Now 

The Universal Three-Flue Base Burner 

Before you buy a heater, we want to show^ you the 
Imperial Universal Base Burner. This heater has three 
back flues and three base fhies besides the double heat- 
ing flues that take the cold air up from the floor. 

MORE RADIATING SURFACE by actual meas- 
urement than any other heater on the market. Conse- 
quently the most powerful heater, as well as the most 
economical. 

A guarantee bond with every Universal. 

A Large 16-lnch Base Burner 

Only $^5.00 

The best HEATER VALUE ever offered. A 
sparkling Universal Base Burner with full size 16-inch 
firepot, shaker ring and duplex grate. A double heater 
with plenty of radiating surface. Large back flues and 
base flues, full nickel trimmed and a beauty as well as a 
powerful and economical heater, worth $52.50 — special 

51ARKLING UNnr »SAL at $45.00. 




Some Special Values In Our Drapery Dept. 



30x60 Smyrna Rugs, in new Oriental designs and colors; 
they are a well made, durable rug, fringed on the ends, 
and are a very handy size for between doors, halls and 
bedrooms; a rug that is cheap at $2.75, spe- tf4 TO 
cial this week at, each 4Fl«Ifc 

Bed Pillows, filled with feathers cleaned by hygienic pro- 
cess, cases are best grade of ticking, good size, and QQgi 
well worth $1.65 a pair. This week we sell them at. •Ot 

Bed Comforts, covered in fancy silkoline on one side and 
plain color on the other; they are quilted and have O^^ 
heavy stitched edges; worth $1.40 each; a bargain . .C/4/t 

Hemp Carpet, noted for its good wearing quality, makes 
an attractive floor covering, comes in pretty stripe effects, 
yard wide; this carpet is reasonable at 35c a yard; ^"Zf 
a bargain chance at, per yard fc4/t 



25 PER CENT OFF— Net Bedspreads— 
They are right up to date, come in the Bat- 
tenberg and French Rennaisance styles with 

Bolster throws complete, are a very rich, 
effective bed covering, and certainly add 
greatly to the beauty of a bedroom. Some 
are slightly mussed from showing, and we 
cut the price accordingly. Prices from 
$7.00 to $33.00. Come in and look 
them over. 

SHIRT WAIST BOXES— Good size, cov- 
ered in pretty cretonnes and lined, have 
brass handles, padded top, stand 14 inches 
high, 14 inches wide and 27 inches Qfi/» 
long; easily worth $1.75, special •OC 





Cut 
Glass 

—AT- 

Deeply Cut Prices ! 



Book Racks 

Worth 59c 

Special at 29c 

The book racks are just the thing 
for your library table. They are 
made of oak and finished in early 
English. Folds up and can be put 
in a drawer when not in use. Reg- 
ular price 50c; special ^Qa 




We are showing a very large assortment of Ctit Glass. 
Having just received a large shipment from one of the best 
known factories, we are making some special prices this week 
as an inducement for an early inspection of this line. 

8-inch Bowls, neat patterns, Creamers and Sugars, in 

deeply cut and highly polished; neat designs — worth $3.25 

regular $3.50 ^^ QO the pair— tf^ Of% 

Bowls, at 4H»yO I at ^ I .OV 

Star Cut Tumblers, high grade clear glass, highly 
polished, worth $1.69 a set of six, at 



39c 



Easy Terms 
of Payment 

at 
Cash Prices. 



COMPLETE HOUSEFURNISBERS 




DULUTH. MINNESOTA 




The Safest 

Place 
To Trade. 



:, 
. 1-- 



I 



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nram'tnn-ai— -« 




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New Mexico; that in some of the 

courts of the territory the English 
language Is not spoken, and that in 
these courts an American citizen of 
the territory is tried and often con- 
victed without understanding a word 
of the proceedings. 

The Mexicans outnumber the whites, 
according to Mr. Lindstrom, and the 
territory is virtually governed by the 
influence of Old Mexico. For this 
reason Arizona has resisted the idea 
of joining with New Mexico. 

Mr. Lindstrom came here to engage 
a number of laborers, and he is leav- 
ing tonight with a large crew of men 
for the lumber operations that his 
company is engaged in. 

LA BELLE OTERO BURNED. 



Famous Spanish Dancer Meets With 
Accident in Theater. 

Paris, Oct. 15. — La Belle Otero, the 
famous Spanish dancer, who is equally 
well known in Paris and New York, 
and who has been appearing at the 
Marignv theater, has met with a seri- 
ous accident. While in her dressing 
room a small lantip was upset and the 
flame set fire to the lace on her cloth- 
ing. Before the flames could be extin- 
guished she was badly burned and 
fainted. It will be some time before 
she will be able to leave her bed. 



Stewart Heaters 

win Save Fuel 

They have made good 
right here in Duluth. 

Don't buy a No-Name 
heater — one that the maker 
is ashamed of, when you can 
buy a 

STEWART FOR $25.00. 
TERMS, $1.00 PER WEEK 




A WELL-KNOWN TYPE, 

Leonore O'Reilly, who is perhaps the 
most powerful orator among the 
American suffragettes, was compli- 
mented at a luncheon In Boston on her 
eloquence. 

"It is my splendid subject," said Miss 
O'Reilly, modestly, "that makes me 
seem to speak well. My subject affords 
me many telling things to say, and I 
say them simply. That is all." 

She smiled. 

"I try to avoid," she resumed, "the 
sort of oratory that marks the average 



political campaign. That Is frightful. 

"One night on the East side I saw a 
workingman I knew lounging at the 
doorway of a public hall, and from in- 
side came a continuous and earnest 
bellowing. 

"'Do you know who's speaking?'. I 
asiced my friend. "Or haven't you been 
in?' 

" 'Oh, yes. I've been in," said he 
'Assemblyman Blagg Is speaking.' 

"'What about?' I Inquired. 

"My friend sighed and shook his 
head. 

" "He didn't say," he answered. 



ttu^ 



. A 



TOOL SPECIALS 



FOR SATURDAY 




steer's Large Expansive Bitt 
— regular $1.75; Saturday 
Special, $1.35. 

Pearson's Nailer — regular 
$4.50, Saturday Special, $3.45. 




Talntor's Positive Saw Set — 
regular 75c, Saturday Special, 
55c. 



Irwin Auger Bitts in sots — 
regular $4.50, Saturday Spe- 
cial $3.25. 




14-inch Iron Jack Planes — 
regular $1.90, Saturday Spe- 
cial $1.40. 

6-ft. Zig Zag Rules, with 
rivet joints — regular 60c, Sat- 
urday Spetial, 40o. 



-If^BC*^ 



KELiE^'HARDMRLGO. 



YOUR/^MONEY BACK IF NOT SATlSriEb 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: lERIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909 




TIGERS TIE 
THEMATES 

Detroit Is Making a Great 

Up-Hill Fight for the 

Championship. 

Several Home Players Hwt— 

The Deciding Contest 

Saturday. 



li.iics -MllltT. Hus!i. l>. Jones. I>ouble plays — Byme 
to Ahstutn: SrhmJilt to Itush; SSunirtt to Moriarlty. 
IWt on baips— Detroit. 0: Pittiburg. S. Hase, on 
ImlU — Oft Miillin. 1; off WiUU. 1; off Camnitz. 1. 
Hit !;y I'llchpr— Rv WllUs. 1. nu*!i. Struck out— IJy 
Miillln. -<: I'T WillU. 1; I'y Piaillppi. 1. Time— 2 
lu'uri. Urapirts— Kratu. Klem, Jolui»u>ue and O'LjugH- 
lui. 




Detroit, Mich.. Oct. 15.— Detroit kept 
in the ereat fig:ht for the worUl's base- 
ball championahip by defeating PitU- 
burg 5 to 4 yesterday in a battle full 
of sensational and thrilling situations 
and today the teams are tied witli 
three victories each. The .seventh and 
deciding game will be played here 
Saturday. A fear-Inspiring rally in 
the ninth inning by Pittsburg was 
stopped after one run was scored, but 
three Detroit players were injured 
in stemming the rusji of Pittsiiurg 
runs to the plate. 

Tom Jones, the Detroit first baseman, 
was the most seriously hurt. His neck 
and spine were Injured in a collision 
with Wilson at first base and this re- 
sulted in Pittsburg scoring its flrst 
run of tlial session. Ciiarles Scninidt. 
the catcher, had ins right leg ^badly 
gaslied in blocking Abstein oft the 
plate in the final inning. The play- 
that flnislied the threatening rally of 
the National leaRue champions re- 
sulted in the injury of George Moriar- 
ity. when he caught Wilson trying to 
steal third on Abbaticchio'.s strike- 
out in the same inning. Moriarlty s 
left knee was badly hurt when W ilson 

slid into the base. ,•,,,, ,,,» that 

Tom Jones was so badly hurt that 
he was carried from the field in an 
unconscious condition. He recovei-ed 
consciousness in the olubl.ouse and in- 
sisted that he be taken to his home, 
rather tlmn to a hospital. He was 
taken home in an ambulance and it is 
practically certain he will not be able 
to play in Saturdays decisive Same. 
Schmidt, it is thought, will be al)tp to 
plav and there is no doubt that 
Moiiarity will be in the decisive bat- 
tle. The injurv to Jones nece^^sitated 
the shifting of Crawford to first base, 
L>. Jones to center lield and sending 
Molntyre to left. ^ ^. 

The Pittsburg team got away in the 
lead bv .-smashing out throe runs on 
four successive hits of Muli'.n -n tlie 
first inning. After that the great Mul- 
lin was invincible until the ninth whon 
he weakened enough to get into a 
dangerous situation, only to extricate 
Jiim-self by another marvelous exhibi- 
tion of pitching. 

Detroit i>ut up another of its won- 
derful up-hill games. The American 1 
league i^liampions .scored one run in 
the first inning and batted \ ic Willis 
Off tlx^^ slab by scoring two runs in the 
fourth and one more in the fifth by 
terrific batting. Camnitz succeeded 
•Willis and Detroit batted him hard 
enough to get another run in the sixth 
Innintr. Camnit;: was withdrawn when 
Hyatf batted for him in the seventh 
aiid the veteran Phillippi stopped the 

Detroit scoring. 

DETROIT 



Tomorrow Is the time. San Fraticisco 
the place; and Messrs. J^l>f,^»"„^"** 
Ketchel. eminent "".^"^en.ilie prin- 
cipals. Wlio will be the world s cham- 
pion .' Ask what are the wild waves 

^%'f7ou were going to put a bet down 
on the result of the fight. >;^^" J ;^"Vi 
undoubtedly choose Johnson to win. U 
you placed a wager on the white man 
it is because the odds lavor the sniokc 
and there is generally a run for your 
m>ney when the odds are played the 
way they are being played in the pres- 

^"whS^ou come right down to the 
talk-to-me-earnest-Alice stage of 
inoceedings. Jolinson has all 
of the mpendlng mitt controversy, so 
far as advance dope can be Bathe led 

There are some who zealously hold 
to thfopinion that the big smoke can t 
tight If you. Archie, are of those ad- 
hering steadfastly to a narrow line of 
doubt you want to forget that stuf^. 
The smoke can tight; in .fact much 
better tlian he has t^li^^wn in the past^ 

It Ketchel Is the victor in the battle 
of tomorrow, he must truly be cred ted 
as being one of the grandest millers 
we havl had since the palmy days of 
ancient Bob Fitzsimmons. 

Why shouldn't the big black be able 
fi«'ht? If you will overlook 



the 
the best 



the 



shambling, flat 



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r.bb. rf 

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M >n.^rlty. 3b 

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.•<<-hi;iilt. e 

MiilUil. P 

T tiU 



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pliUUppi p.. 
fAbbiitlcchlo 



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PITTSBVRG 
AB. 

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Tolali 

♦B.uto<l for r.\mnltz In ioventU. 
tlJ.ittitl for PliUlippi in ninth. 
8«)re by Innliiff: ,. ..„..„» 
TtetTT.lt 10»2 1100 X— 3 

pftuimrg ■■.:: ^" VL'^MT* 

Summ.try: Two-base hits— Wagner. Crawfiri. I>ele- 
h.inty, ScUmlJt. Cobb. Miililn. Hits— Off WIHU 7 
In 5 Inntriie: ott Camnitz, 2 in 1 Iniilng; )ff PlUlbp- 
pl 1 tn 2 Innlnss. Sacrifice lUt— CUrke. .Stjlai 



to -„ 

fact tliat he has big. , , , „ 
feet you must concede that he has a 
n agnittcent physique. He is narrow in 
the hips, like mo.st fast men; lie ha^ 
limbs built for speed; and his arms and 
sl^ulders might be taken for models 
by some great sculptor. ,,,„., th« 

Johnson is a man weighing in the 
neighborhood of 200 pounds in the 
best of condition. He Possesses a won- 
derful reach. Any man welghmg- 00 
pounds and with a very thorough 
knowledge of boxing, is a hard man 
to beat, even if he does not pack the 
hardest punch in the world. 

Whether or not Johnson has a puncn, 
is a question that has perplexed sorne 
of the most astute students ot the 
game of boxing. Some critics rush in 
and declare that the negro does not 
pLssess a punch. That may be true; 
again, It may not be true. 

\Mien Jack Johnson fought Jack 
Jeffries he had a grievance against t lie 
Jeffries family. James J. , :'^ff"'^-^ 
would not consent to fight ."'"l-. '^^ 
Jim had consented to fight the dinge. 
the colored man might have had an 
even greater grievance against ine 
Jeffries family But that is not here. 

nor there. . . , t, ,ir 

He sure did have it m for Jack 
Jeffries. He hit the brother of the 
champion in the fifth round, and t:ie 
recipient of black Jack's wrath slid 
half wav across the ring on his ear. 

Tliey wert' still sticking ammonia bot- 
tles under the nostrlLs of the ••little 
brother and swathing his noddle with 
wet cloths when Johnson was asking 
the treasurer of the show for his bit. 

Jack Jeffries was an ox-like lellow, 
who would have been taken more seri- 
ously had he not been the brother of 
the then champion. But from that 
dav on there have been some followers 
of "boxing who have slyiy held to the 
opinion that the black did possess a 
punch We may have rea-^on to become 
convinced, of this fact after the fight 

with KetcheU , .^ •, .. 

The fight that will be decided tomor- 
row U attracting more interest than 
any fight staged on the coast for some 
time The vf-ry fact that Ketchel has 
a wide following throughout the couti- 
try — a following cofnposed of people 
wiio are loyal enough to say that he 
can thrash the black — makes the in- 
terest in the fight greater than it 
would be if there were only a few 
half-hearted ones who believed that 
Ketchel was the better man. 

Honestly, there are a lot of people 
who believe that Ketchel will stow 
away the big coal from Galveston. It 
is this difference of opinion that stops 
horse racf^s. Ask Governor Hughes. It 
is also this difference of opinion that 
makes prize fights. Lobster, caviar, 
crab meat or beefsteak — but why go 
on There are many little things In 
this republic of ours that arise from 
difference of opinion. 

There are many people who hope 
that the white bov will be the victor in 
tomorrow's battle. There will be a 
mighty cheer go up from the throat of 
thousands, if the returns of the fight 
say that Ketchel is giving the big 
black the worst of it. You couldn't 
conceive of a more popular victory. 



There has never been a heavyweight 
champion as unpopular as the present 
title holder. , ^ 

However, the chances are against 
Ketchel. He has height, weight, reach 
science and ring generalship pitted 
against liim. Ketchel may pack the 
hardest punch and he may be able to 
a.ssimilate the harder beating. That 
question can be better answered after 
tlie fight. The odds look fearfully 
against him. and unless there is a 
frameup. one of the kind famous on 
tlie Pacific slope, it truly does look as 
if the smaller man has not a chance. 

From the coast comes the report that 
Ketchel will enter the ring weighing 
175 pounds. The same reports flashes 
the news tliat Johnson will weigh 
about ia7. almost precisely the weight 
he fought Burns at. 

If these reports are reliable, there 
will not be a great difference in 
the weights of the two men. Twenty 
pounds difference ;-•' not so much in the 
case of two big men. If Ketchel enters 
tlie ring at the figure credited to him, 
ho will be bigger than he has ever been 
before, in the matter of actual fighting 
weight. 

Bob Fitzsimmons won the world s 
heavyweight championship when he 
was ligiiter tiian Ketchel will be in 
tomorrow's fight, and Fitzsimmons 
never fought a greater fight than the 
day he hewed Jim Corbett down to 
his size. 

Tomorrow will be the great test tor 
Ketchel. We will discover if he is a 
second Bob Fitzsimmons. Incidentally, 
we may discover if Jack Johnson is 
really the great fighter a world's 
heavyweight ciiampion is supposed to 
be, or whether he is a very much over- 
rated pugilist. 

• • • 
Wonder if there ars breakers ahead 
for the boys from home. Will the 
Gophers encounter grave and great 
opposition from the Cornhuskers"' 
Right away vou will say no. You had 
better wait until after the game. 

In 1900 the Gophers journeyed down 
to Lincoln, flushed with the defeat of 
Wisconsin and other teams of the 
West. Before that great team suc- 
ceeded in beating the men from Bryan's 
i^tamplng ground the followers of tlie 
Minnesota men had the greatest scare 
of the season thrown Into them. 

It really looked for a while as If the 
Cornhuskers were going to defeat the 
Gophers. Tlien tlio great 1900 bunch 
jallied and managed to win out. 

In 1902 the nervy bunch from Lin- 
coln, where narve is proverbial — read 
modern hi.story of the Dettiocratic party 
— trounced the Gophers right on tlie:r 
own hills. They licked Minnesota 6 
to 0. The Nebraska team has always 
been a very hard team for Minnesota 
to defeat. This season the i>ovs from 
Lincoln have been laying low for the 
Gophers, and while it does not seem 
probable that they will defeat the 
great team that Minnesota appears to 
liave this vear, Minnesota will know 
that she ha"s been in a game when the 
referee's whistle blows for closing 
time. 



GOPHERS VS. 
NE^KA 

Pickering Will Be Missed in 
Game Against Corn- 
huskers. 

Minnesota Band and Rooters' 
Club WiH Not Accom- 
pany Team. 



BOSTON FIGHTER 
IN GOOD SHAPE 

Ketchel Announces That John- 
son Will Do All the 
Rushing. 

San Francisco. Cal.. Oct. 15.— Jack 
Johnson and Stanley Ketchel, the prin- 
cipals in Salurday'.s match for the 
heavyweight championship, passed a 
strenuous day in their training camp.s. 
Neither needed any additional work, 
but thev worked furiously under the 
command of a moving picture operator. 

Ketchel has surprised the pugilistic 
world bv announcing that he will not 
carry the fight to his opponent, as has 
been his custom. He declares Johnson, 
as the champion, must do the leading, 
and says he will not tear into the big 
felloM-, unless the latter shows unex- 
pected weakness from the start. On 
tlie other hand, Johnson's manager as- 
serted that his man will go after 
ketchel from the sound of the gong to 
score an early knockout. Belting on 
the big match .showed an Increase, but 
the odds remain at 10 to 4, with John- 
son on the long end. Although no 
change in the odds occurred, it is be- 
lieved at the poolrooms that the flow 
of short money which began today will 
soon cause a shortening of the price. 
Considerable money is being wagered 
on even propositions that Ketchel will 
stay fifteen rounds against Johnson. 

Both fighters are nervous on the eve 
of the battle, and of the two Ketchel 
seems to show the greater strain. 
Johnson weighed 196 pounds yesterday, 
two pounds lighter than he expects to 
be when he climbs through the ropes 
Saturday, ivetchel remains at his an- 
nounced weight of 175 pounds. Ihls 
he declared to be his natural weight 
and the point at which he feels the 
strongest. 

"Pennsy" Wins. 

Oct. 15. — Pennsyl- 



Minneapolis. Minn.. Oct. 15.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The Minnesota 
football team got out for their last 
real hard practice of the week last 
night and showed up in great form. 
Everything worked smoothly in the 
short scrimmage and the coaches were 
highly pleased with the article of foot- 
ball put up by the varsity. Although 
the weather and condition of the field 
have not been the best for football 
practice. nevertheless the Gopher 
coaches feel that the team has had a 
good hard week of it, and will show 
a decided improvement in the game 
at Omaha tomorrow. This afternoon 
will be spent in putting on the finish- 
ing touclies and a short signal prac- 
tice will be about, all. Tom Sheylin 
and some former Minnesota football 
stars have been out all tlis week to 
lielp Williams bring the ttjam around 
to lop notch form. There were so 
many assistant coaches ou'. this week 
and they all had s(<;mjKh to say that 
It sounded more like a rooters club 
than a bunch ot> : fsotball sharks 
teaching football. ^'^ ■ _., , jn, 

Pickering has been badly missed this 
week in practice and the many men 
who were tried out -In his place did not 
prove satisfactory. Smith and Erdahl 
have both been worked at fullback as 
well as McCree. who was thifled from 
right tackle on several occasions. 11 
is uncertain who vs^lH stait the game 
at fullback, but the man whoever he 
is will not be able to fill Pickerings 
shoes. Pickering is recoveriiig from 
his injury at a rapid rate and he will 
probably be able to get bf.ck into the 
game the flrst of next week. Powers. 
the big guard, has been playing very 
poorly this week and unless he lakes 
a brace he will be taking a trip back 
to the scrubs. The fight g;oing on for 
the left halfback position is certainly 
a pretty one and is calling the atten- 
tion of every rooter. Aitkinson. Stev- 
ens and Rosenwald are al making a 
strong bid for the berth and every one 
"is at sea as to who will win out Pay 
Young has been out on ttie field this 
week, but was unable t3 get into 
scrimmage on account of hi.s con- 
valescinl from the grip. The former 
Gopher tackid will be there with bells 
on next week however, and then 
Walker and McCree will have to work 
to keep 'their positions. Minnesota 
has more than a wealth, of material 
for football this year. There , are 
about thirty men on the first team 
.squad who are eligible .^Jad who are all 
of the first caliber. Tlie whole first 
team squad will mak.e the trip to 
Omaha and if WUlianxs wished he 
could run an entire new team the sec- 
ond half tomocrow. It is pi'ftty sure 
that he will take no chances like that. 

'^ToV somi unknown reason thfe team 
does not leave for Omaha until toniglit 
at 7:30. Why this is. no one seems to 
know, but it seems 



the entire game without any noise or 
encouragement to help them out at all. 
For this reason, if not any other, the 
band should be sent down to the Ne- 
braska game, the students claim. 

SPEAKER ONE OF 
SEASON'S FINDS 

Boston Man Promises to 

Equal the Great Ty 

Cobb. 

In counting over the stars of the 
present season, in which young Eddie 
Collins of the Athletics, and Cobb and 
Wagner have come in for the lion's 
share of exuberant praise and fulsome 
flattery, there has been one young man 
who has been neglected not a little bit. 
This young man is Tris Speaker, star 
outfielder of the Boston Americans, and 
the man who defeated the New York 
Nationals for the championship of the 
East, as they are pleased to term it In 
New York and Boston. 

All year Speaker has played a star 
game for Fred Lake's Boston speed 
boys. His fielding has been the sensa- 
tion of many a game, while his bat- 
ting has been the bright light of many 
of the games of the fast Boston team. 
He ranks right up with Cobb as a 
fielder and as a batter, and students 
of tlie game, who have watched the itn- 
provement of the young man, are of the 
opinion that in another season Speaker 
will be as good a baseball player as 
the great and only "Georgia Peach.' 

Scout George Huff, athletic director 
of the University of Illinois, signed the 
youngster from the Houston club of the 
Texas State league. Speaker came 
north to play with Boston. The 
voungster didn't look good and he 
was allowed to go. He wasn't sent a 
contract before the first of the next 
March, so little did the Boston club 
think of Speaker, after the one peep at 
him, and thus he was allowed to be- 
come a free agent. 

Speaker didn't know this. He was 
given a chance to get on with Little 
Rock, and was glad to accept any 
terms. He thought that he was obliged 
to accept any term.s. The Boston club, 
very fortunately, signed a joint agree- 
ment whereby Speaker would revert to 
the Boston club al the close of the 
season. Thus, quite by accident, has 
Boston secured one of the greatest 
baseball players in the business. 

His true worth has been strikingly 
illustrated in the series with the New 
York Nationals. In yesterday's game 
Speaker was the star, as he has been 
in each of the games played. He batted 
in three runs yesterday and two the 
day before. In all of the games his 
work has been directly responsible for 
the victory of the American league 
team over its National league rival. 



ST. PAUL GAME 
ARRANGED 

Duluth Will Line Up Against 

the Mechanic Arts 

Team. 



evening in the first match game of th© 
season. The contest will begin at 8 
o'clock. The teams will be composed 
of the following members: 

Cubs — A. Begelin (Capt.). G. Brown, 
H. Smith, H. Dinham. O. Olson. Giants 
— A. Bethune (Capt.). C. Berinl, W. 
Crosby, B. Berry. R. Porter. Tigers — 
F. Zimmerman (Capt.), R. Dunlop, R. 
McDonald. C. Persons. F. Winkle. 
White Sox — B. Stark (Cai>t.). 1. Pohl- 
man, O. J. Rue, F. Wildman. L. Water- 
man. 



First Opportunity to 
What Duluth Team 
Can Do. 



See 



Final arrangements for the game 
with Meciianic Arts tomorrow have 
been completed by the Duluth Central 
management. The game tomorrow 
promises to be better than the rather 
rank exhibitions that have been played 
so far this season by the teams that 
have opposed Central. 

In the game of tomorrow the first 
real line on the ability of Central will 
be gathered. How strong the team Is 
It is rather hard to say. The teams 
that Central has encountered this sea- 
son have not been strong enough to 
furuisli any real test of the ability of 
any team. When Central lines up 
against a team that has some stand- 
ing among the teams of the Twin 
Cities, lovers of football up here will 
be given an opportunity to see just 
how fast this year's team is. 

Last year there were many of the 
opinion that the 1908 team was un- 
oealable. The opinion grew on the 
members of the team themselves. Then 
came the game with the doughty team 
from St. Paul Central. That game 
really ■showed that the local team did 
not know as much about football as all 
imagined. 

There are many of the opinion that 
the present Central team is in some 
respects stronger than the team of last 
season. The members of the team play 
iiarder and are more willing. Just 
what the team will do in a hard game 
reinaini^^ to be seen. While never rank- 
ing with the best teams of the Twin 
Cities, the Mechanic Arts high school 
has generally produced representative 
high school football teams. The game 
tomorrow should be one well worth 
witnessiiifiT. 



MaU'h (iame. 

The Big Duluths of the City Bowl- 
ing league and the Big Duluths of the 
Commercial Bowling league will play 
a match game this evening at th« 
Majestic alleys. A meeting of repre- 
sentatives of the two leagues will be 
held this evening to frame a schedule. 

The Pool Tournaiiient. 

In the first game of the handicap 
pool tournament at the Central bil- 
liard hall, Mike David defeated Vic 
Van Kuren by the score of 150 to 108. 
Van Kuren's handicap was 125 to 150 
for David. 

A. Mausoff will play W. William* 
this evening at S o clock 

JUST LOOK WHAT 

DARBY HAS SIGNED. 



Darby O'Brien, field manager of the 
White Sox, according to a communica- 
ticn to Al Kuehnow. lias signed a 
pitcher by the name of Ilowaid. Ac- 
cording to Bertillon measur«menta 
forwarded by Darby, tne fellow stands 
6 feet 2, and is a southpaw. He is 
as strong as an ox and possesses the 
speed of a Mathewson. He will. Darby 
believes, take the place left vacant by 
smiling Schmiiler, and will make us 
sll forget about Richard Brinsley 
Sheridan Thorsen. Darby, at the pres- 
ent writing, has over twenty men un- 
der contract. 



a little strange 



Oskaloosa. Iowa, 
vanla, 8; Iowa. 5. 



tl-at the team should be made to ride 
all night before such -a hard .and Im- 
portant contest as that V7ith Nebras- 
ka The men will reach Omaha all 
tired out and in no way fit for putting 
up the game they are capable of. Some 
say that the reason was because the 
athletic board of control couldn t 
stand the expense; othersi say it \yas 
Coach Williams' wish. Whatever the 
cause, the close foltojvers of the team 
and even the team" itself, are not at 
all satisfied with such a course. 

Another stir creatW the past week 
in the Gopher camp ^Vai the refusal of 
the athletic board tq send the uni- 
versity band down jte'-.Omaha. Minne- 
sota takes in more- ihbne.- on football 
than any other school in he West and 
the profits run clo.se to fiO.OOO a year. 
Is there anv plausible excuse to be 
given why the band - sjiould not ac- 
company the team Sin all its ttips? 
This is" the practice' In other schools 
where they cannot afford it nearly as 
much as Minnesota cafh. Nebraska sent 
a band to MinneapolR last year and it 
is believed by more than a few that 
Minnesota ought tp.jfethirn the cour- 
tesy No rates could- tt? secured to Oma- 
ha and so scarcely any rooters will 
make the trip. The maroon and gold 
players will go on tlie field and play 



Ban B. Johnson should order the league 
directors to give the kid a medal, for 
thus upholding the honor of the young- 
er organization. 

In praising stars of the season past. 
Speaker should not be forgotten. 

GLOOM IS DEEP 
IN PITTSBURG 



ALI^ riTWBI^I^ 



CI^OTHBt BEAR. THE VWIOW l^ABEI.. 



THE FITWELL FOR THE BEST VALUES IN NEW FALL 




SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

Every man who has not yet bought I^'s new Fall 
suit or overcoat will certainly visit the FITWli.1.1^ 
store. If you will compare prices and va'ties you 
will understand readily why the FITWELL is so 
popular with men who appreciate good clothes ana 
at no exorbitant prices. 




Wild Scenes Enacted on 
Streets During the Base- 
ball Game. 

Pittsbirg. Pa., Oct. 15. — Pittsburg 
has a reputation of being smoky and 
dirty, but a pall hung over the city 
last night that is deeper than any 
cloud of smoke or fog — the gloom fol- 
lowing the defeat of the Pittsburg 
team at Detroit yesterday. 

Stieet car traffic was relegated to 
side streets yesterday afternoon dur- 
ing the progress of the game, owing 
to the thousands of people who stood 
in front of the bulletin boards at all 
the newspapers. A deafening cheer 
greeted the returns of the first inning, 
but thereafter all were on the anxious 
seat. When the local team had a 
chance to win in the ninth, a scene 
hardly describable was enacted. The 
crowd could hardly contain itself, and 
when Abbaticchlo went to bat in the 
ninth, cries of 'Get a hit, Abbaticchio!" 
rent the air. When the double play, 
ending the game, occurred, the crowd 
appeared da.'.ed. 

Large crowds left here today for De- 
troit, to witness the deciding game of 
the big se ries. 

BOSTON TAKES 
THE FINAL GAME 



I 



These suits and overcoats are all hand tailored, 
hnnd-made buttonholes, felled collars, hand-padded 
shoulders, the best of imported hair cloth. Ihe 
fabrics are all pure wool, in all the newest colornigs. 
such as the new grays, greens, olives, plain blue and 
herringbone serges. The models are stylish, ihe 
trousers come straight, full peg or semi-peg, cuffs 
or plain bottoms as you desire. 




THti hUME OF QUALITY. 
WB PRESS YOUR CLOTHES FREE OF CHARGE. 




The Post-Season Series Was 
a Financial Disappoint- 
ment 

New York, Oct. 15. — The Boston 
Americans wound up the post-season 
series with the New York Nationals 
here yesterday afternoon by winning 
their fourth straight victory, by a 
.score of 5 to 4. Only 789 fans braved 
the cold weather to witness the con- 
test. The locals put up a poor exhibi- 
tion throughout. Speaker again starred 
for Boston, batting in the first three 
runs. The series, in a financial way, 
was a disappointment to the promoters. 

The total receipts for the five games 
was $12,862.50. Of this amount the 
Boston team received $4,006.73, to be 
divided between twenty players, the 
manager, trainer and secretary. The 
New York players get as their share of 
the receipts $2,671.16. Score: R. H. E. 

Boston 2 100 20 00—5 9 1 

New York 12 10 0—410 2 

Batteries — Papke, Wolter, Matthews, 
Hall and Carrigan; Crandall and Schlei. 
Umpires — R igler and Connoll y. 

Miller Wins From Luttberg. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Oct. 15. — Young Mill- 
er of St. Paul took two falls from 
Max Luttbeg of Cleveland in a wrest- 
ling match here last night for the 
welterweight championship. Miller 
won the flrst and third falls in 24 
minutes and 1% minutes respectively. 
Luttbeg won the second fall in one-half 
of a minute. 

* 

Frightful Fate Averted. 

"I would hava been a cripple for life, 
from a terrible cut on my icnee cap," 
writes Frank DIsbery, Kelllher. Minn., 
without BjJklen's Arnica Salve, 
which soon cured me." Infallible for 
wounds, cuts and bruises, it soon cures 
Burns, Scalds, Old Sores, Boils, Skin 
Eruptions. World's be&t for Piles. 25c 
at all drussists. 

Don't complain about the cost of 
living. Barthe-Martln sell groceries 
at wholesale. 



RUMOR STARTLES 
THE FIGHT FANS 

Johnson Insists on Detail 
Arrangements Before En- 
tering the Ring. 

San Francisco, Cal.. Oct. 15. — Rumors 
of a hitch in the Johnson-Ketchel 
championship fight, which is sched- 
uled to take place in Coffroth's arena 
tomorrow afternoon appear to have 
been hasty and unfounded, according 
to information that came from both 
camps this morning. , , ^ ,^ 

Johnson and Coftroth had a confer- 
ence late last night and it was sur- 
mised immediately that there was 
trouble over the side bet of $10,000. 
This rumor spread rapidly when it was 
learned that CofEroth had said: 

"There may be no fight. I'll tell you 
more about it." 

George Little, Johnson's managei, 
when asked this morning if there was 
any hitch, said: 

"Certainly not. Johnson and con- 
roth had a talk last night, but nothing 
serious came up. It was simply that 
Johnson wanted to have an under- 
standing in regard to certain little 
TOatters so as not to consume time 
when the men entered the ring, it 
was decided that the managers of the 
fighters should have a conference with 
Referee Welch today and settle every- 
thing that is likely to cause friction at 
the last moment. There is nothing 
wrong with the side bet and there is 
no chance of anything cropping up to 
interfere with the fight." . 

Willis Britt. Ketchel's manager, said 
that he had not heard of any trouble, 
and that he hardly thought Johnson 
would raise any question as to the sloe 

%Vhen Johnson stepped on the scales 
after his work today, he weighed 198 
Pounls. better I would be suspic- 

ious," he said. "The .o"ly t\^'"e, J."i 
sorry about is, that it is not Jeffries I 

'^'^•/e^4"r^ ^S^'jettviesr said Bob 

tin^T' ^ouT'biu^er St^'pit tSs 
other fellow first. If Ketchel lands on 
you! he will make you forget there is 
such a man as Jeffries on earth, and I 
know wh at I am talking abo ut. 

EXHIBITION GAME 

AT THE ARMORY. 

Companies C and E will meet 
Wednesday night at the armory in an 
exhibition indoor baseball game. This 
will probably be the last exhibition be- 
fore llie opening of the regular sched- 
ule of games of the Military league, 

^Company E has been showing up 
well in all the practice games, and 
tliere are many who dope the E team 
to win the pennant In the military or- 
ganization. , _. .i,„ 

On Thanksgiving evening one of the 
big games of the season will be played. 
On that occasion Company E team will 
meet the commercial travelers team. 
There are some very strong players on 
tht' U C T. team, and the game prom- 
ises to be one of the exciting events of 

'^^AU^of'the teams of the league are 
practicing in the armory, and with 
the opening of the indoor season some 
very fast games are promised. 

BILLIARD TOURNAMENT 

AT COMMERCIAL CLUB. 

A ereat deal of interest is being 
shown in the pool and billiard tourna- 
ment of the Commercial club. The tour- 
nament will be held this winter in the 
ntw billiard rooms of the club and 
every day, under the direction of Hugo 
Eisenach, the man who tells you how 
to hold your cue in the right manner, 
candidates for honors in the coming 
tournament are practicing'. 

Three new tables have been 
added to the equipment of the billiard 
room and the entries for the tourna- 
ment' promise to be more numerous 
this year t hati ever before. 

FIRST MATCH GAME 

OF THE SEASON. 



HE WILL GCT $10,000. 

Rich Wife Will Pay Bsi^eball Play- 
er Not to Contest Divorce. 

Bristol. N. H., Oce. 15. — Ten thousand 
dollars is the price demanded from hta 
wife by William J. Decato, a Ijaseball 
pitcher, in payment for his playing 
the part of a faithful husband for 
seven years. She is suing for divorco. 
The money, he declares, he will re- 
ceive because of his agreement not to 
contest the divorce suit. Mrs. Decato 
is the richest woman in Grafton 
county. 

Sixteen years ago. while employed 
in the Mason-Perkins paper mliis, the 
head of the firm. Charles A. Mason. 
fell in love witli and married her. .She 
was then 16. Four years after Mason 
died, leaving her $200,000 and a man- 
sion in Bristol. 

"Billy" Decato. the village black- 
smith's son, and a popular baseball 
player, had been her schoolmate and 
neighbor, and a year after Mason's 
death he led Ihe fair young widow to 
the altar in the village church. 

"Billy" says that as soon as his wife 
pays him $10,000 for a divorce he will 
go to the Utica, N. Y.. team, which 
hired him at a salary of $1,800 a year. 



r 



Invite Your Friends to 

dine with yon 

SVNDA.Y BVCNING 

at the 



n 



»i 



ST. LOVIS 



Elaborate Menu. 

La Brosse Orchestra. 

American. European. 



Originality and Individuality I 

Our printing does not all look 
alike. We stamp it with individ- 
uality and originality. Let us show 
you what we can do. 

Millar Printing Co. 

Ring Up 1604, Old 'Phone. 



"Half a Block from Herald Sq." 
HOTEL 

COLrl^INOWOOD 



West 
35th 
St. 



On the block between 

FIFTH AVE. & B'WAY 



New 
York 
City 



OBtn •elect accommodatkjni t« tUicrlmlnatlii* 
peoplie. 

ABSOLDTELT riBKrROOr, Wi afford* eten 
faculty for the comforts of tueiU. 

Situated la the tbu heart of the clt». In a 
Terr aulet neUhborhood. conrenlent to all sur- 
face. Subway and e)«»»ted railway Una. ji-'d »ii 
the mldit of the ahopplng and theaUr dUtrlct. 

Rooms With Batli, S2 and Up 

Special rates for Summer montha. 

Restaurant a la Carte. 

BETH H. MOSELEY. 

Formerly of New Haven House. 

New Haven, Conn. 



GOPHER SHOE WORKS 



W 



Where 
You 

GOPHE R 

Improved 

Shoe 
Repairing 



Dl'LL'TM — »0 l«t Ave. W. 

12 4tb Ave. W. 
6np«rior — 141 S Tower Ave. 



LINCOLN PARK 

ROLLER. RIN K 

Afternoons and Evenings. 
Full Marine Band. 

Ladles' Matinee every Thursday and 
Saturday. Free instructions. 



|M. 



The Tigers and the Cubs of the Y. 
C. A. Bowling league will meet this 



Guns and Ritles 
For Rent. 

Kelley Hardware Co 

DaloUi. Minn. 





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pHBHl 



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20 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 




7 West 

Superior 

Street. 




DOLUTH. 

Minn. 



New Suit i*"( 



and 

Cloak 

House, 



Tailored Suits 



-AT- 



$17.50 



Saturday we place on sale two hundred Suits 
worth up to i{;25.00. at $17.50 

Makers of high-priced Suits seldom turn their 
attention to the popular priced garments, but as a 
special favor, this lot was made up for us by one 
of the leading manufacturers in America. And 
they show the character of their tailoring, too, not- 
withstanding the low price. 

They come in long styles, the length of the coat 
and the good lines classing them with the higher 
priced garments. The materials are broadcloths, 
diagonals, homespuns and worsteds. The skirts 
are made in the new plaited effects, all col- 
ors $17.50 

Broadcloth Coats at $25 

The coats are made full length of fine black 
broadcloth, all lined with Skinner lining. Some 
have trimming at bottom, giving the long-waisted 
effect fur those who find them more becoming, $25. 

Beautiful Embroidered Dresses, black and pop- 
ular colors, fine grade heavy weight serge and tricot, 
front, back and sleeves handsomely embroidered, 
high military collar, shield front, bottom extra full 
plaited, style and quality of $40.00 dresses, $19.95. 

Misses' Suits at $15 

Many attractive little Misses' Suits in this of- 
fering, including the short jacket effects, with the 
turned up fold at bottom and plaited skirt; the 
skirt looks like a dress; at $15.00 



The annual B. S. Shuman dinner will 
be served this evening- at the Y. M. C. A. 

H. B. Warner, a member of the inter- 
national committee at Pernambuco 
will deliver the principal address. 

Because Mr. Shuman was for a num- 
ber of years secretary of the Duluth 
association, there is a great amount 
of Interest in his work in the Argen- 
tine Republic. The local association 
has undertaken to pay his salary each 
year and the local branch gets credit 
for the work being done under Mr. 
Shuman. 

He is having considerable success in 
the South American venture and as Mr. 
Warner is in close touch with Mr. 
Shuman and his work, the talk at the 
dinner tonight will no doubt prove 
extremely interesting. 

Watson S. Moore will preside and 
it is expected that there will be about 
fifty present. 

• • * 

Sunday morning the Breakfast club 
will meet for tlie second time this sea- 



BANK ROBBER 
IS IDENTIFIED 

Chicago Police Find That 

Suicide Is Man From 

Los Angeles. 

Unknown Woman From New 

York Is Concerned in 

the Affair. 




^ 



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ra::#5^^3:2»^Bk^^:^i: 



— THE— 




OBoitllDQinii Inlilliiii, 

17 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



♦* Where the Best Values 

iti, Melt's and Boys' 

Clothing Are 

G iven. 







Bought here are not only 
made to give a dressed-up 
appearance to the boy, but 
also to wear well. 



1' eis 



an 



School Suits with knicker- 
bocker pants, ages 7 to 17 
years. High-class Overcoats, 
made just like papa's. Out- 
fit vour boy here and save 
half. 



DOUBLE VERDICT 
OR NEW TRIAL 

Judge Cant Provisionally 

Grants Plaintiff's Motion 

in McKay Case. 

Holding: that the verdict of $350 re- 
turned in favor of William McKay in 
his action against the Duluth Street 
Railway company at the last term of 
court is inadequate. Judge Cant has 
filed a decision granting the motion of 
the plaintiff for a new trial unless the 
defendant shall consent to an Increase 
of the verdict from $350 to $700. 

McKay's daughter was injured on the 
Lake avenue street car line a year ago 
last June, one of her legs being cut off 
near the knee as a result of the ace - 
dent. Suit was first brought on behalf 
of the girl and she recovered judg- 
ment for about $6,500. Mr. McKay 
then brought suit for $5,000 for loss of 
services and sufferings endured by him 
on account of the accident to the clnlU. 
The case was tried at the last term of 
court and the Jury fixed his damages 
at $350. 



Chicago, Oct. 15. — The body of the 
Highland Park bank robber was posi- 
tively identified today by Miss Minnie 
Harrington, an actress, as that of 
Lamar Harris, a Los Angeles lawyer 
and orator. Miss Harrington and Har- 
ris were much together at Los Angeles, 
Salt Lake City, Ogden and Chicago. 

Miss Harrington, who had been Mr. 
Harris' companion on automobile rides 
and other festive occasions, betrayed 
no nervousness as she viewed the body 
at Prior's undertaking rooms, and her 
statement of his identity left no room 
for doubt. 

Another AVoman lutereiited. 

Chief of Police Sheehan of Highland 
Park today received the following tele- 
gram from New York: 

••Hold the body for identification. 
Am on my way. 

'•BETTY STEWART." 

Who "Betty Stewart" may be is not 
known here, but it is believed she may 
be the same woman who made in- 
quiries over the long distance tele- 
plione from New York yesterday. 

RoUa Coleman of Kansas City, who 
knows Harris well, is expected here 
to act for Harris' mother, Mrs. W^illiara 
A. Harris, of Los Angeles. 

That Harris was in desperate straits 
for money was indicated in letters re- 
ceived by his young wife in Los An- 
geles some weeks ago, when he wrote 
her from New York that he must have 
money at any cost. 

Knofvn ■« an Orator. 

Harris was about 30 years of age, 
a cultured, well-educated man of good 
address and an orator of repute. His 
father, William A. Harris, a promi- 
nent attorney of Los Angeles, who died 
suddenly a few months ago, was a 
Confederate veteran and one of the 
most distinguished orators of the Cali- 
fornia bar. 

Young Harris was a social favorite 
in Mississippi university and gradu- 
ated with high honors. 



son. The annual election of officers 
will be held at that time. Last Sun- 
day Norman Guthrie addressed the 
men and his tallt wtas greatly enjoyed. 
r. • .' • 
Bible study classes were organized 
Wednesday evening;. Thera was a 
large attendance at the se\'eral meet- 
ings and it now looks as though the 
work this year wtti be «ven more 
successful than last. 

* * • 

Tonight occurs the first bowling 
game of the vear. The Tigers will line 
up against the Giants. The league is 
this year composed of four clubs. They 
are: The Tigers, Giants, White Sox and 
Cubs. 

• • • 

At the regular men's meeting Sun- 
day afternoon Mr. Warner will deliver 
the prinicipal address. He will talk 
of the work going on In Brazil and 
give some inside information as to the 
obstacles and the success with which 
the work is being carried on. 



meet this evening at the CSrace M. E. 
church. Twenty-second avenue west 
and Second street, to complete the or- 
ganization. 

Miss Emma James of Minneapolis, 
the state organizer, has be-jn working 
for the past week in the West end 
securing the initial members. It is un- 
derstood that the new lodge will have 
headquarters In the Sloan block, 
Twentieth avenue west and Superior 
street. 

Mrs. Frame's Funeral. 

Funeral services for Mrs. Susan Vic- 
toria Frame, 69 years old, who died 
Wednesday afternoon at the home of 
her son, George Frame, of Duluth 
Heights, will be held tomorrow after- 
noon at 1:30 o'clock at Olson & Craw- 
ford's undertaking parlors, 2010 West 
Superior street, and at 2 o'clock from 
the Central Baptist church. Mrs. 
Frame formerly lived in the West end. 
She will be buried at Park Hill ceme- 
tery. 

West End Funeral. 

The funeral of Knute A. Finman. 21 
years old, of Birch Park, who died at 
a local hospital Wednesda:', was held 
this afternoon at Olson & Crawford's 
undertaking parlors. 2010 West Supe- 
rior street. Burial took place at Park 
Hill cemetery. Finman died of heart 
trouble after a short illness. He was 
a carpenter and resided wth his par- 
ents near Woodland. 



very interesting address on Mission- 
ary work last evening at the monthly 
meeting of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary society of the Central Bap- 
tist church. 

% 

SWOKDFISH PIERCE BOATS. 

Boston Herald: The arrivals of 
swordflsh at T wharf yesterday are 
the heaviest for some time, eight ves- 
sels bringing 568 fish. In addition to 
the exceptionally large eaten, nearly 
all the arrivals reported trouble on 
their trips. Nearly every boat repoit- 
ed damage from the attacks of the 
giant fish, and two had narrow escapes 
from collision in the fog. 

On the Gchooner Angle B. Watson, 
Capt. Schofieid. off Georges on Thurs- 
day, one of the crew, Wesley Wallace, j 



was sevirely rut in the leg by the at- 
tack of a maddened fish, which drove 
its sword through the bottom of the 
dory. The fish was pierced with the 
lily iron from the '•pulpit' on the 
schooner, and in going after it in the 
dory, Wallace met with his accident. 
He had got the float in when the nsh 
headed in his direction. Before he 
could move out of the way the big 
sword came inboard, piercing Wal- 
lace's left instep and tearing the side 
of the leg. 

The Metacomet, Capt. Simmons, met 
with a fierce swordfish bent on doing 
harm to something. Its attack was so 
fierce that the stout, bony sword went 
through the three-inch plank just at 
the port side of the forefoot, cutting 
its way clear in until six Inches or it 



worst experience .with the Af h. ^^"^^y 
of her four dories were P'fjf%V_,pi 
slordfish, some of them seve.al t.me^^ 
The Minerva had one of ner uu 
Dlerced also, and the man in ", "*°j,* 
Harrow escape from being injured. The 
Albert W. -Black also had a oJi* 
pierced. 






Thines of value that have fallen into 

sale ad. _^ , 

The piano was invented early in the 
eighteenth century. 



r 




I 



GORDON HATS, 

CLUETT and MONARCH 

SHIRTS, 

HOSIERY, 

ARROW BRAND 

COLLARS, 

NECKWEAR, 

all at prices you like to pay. 

The Model will be Open 
Late Tomorrow Night — 
Arrangc~to~Mcct Your 
Friends Here. 



Straight Line 
Effects 

In Ladies' and Gentlemen's Um- 
brellas. The newest Fall ideas: 
Perfectly plain or with gold or 
silver mountings. We have just 
received our complete Fall line 
and are showing some unusual 
values. 

Two Exceedingly- 
Good Values 

A Lady's Umbrella with ster- 
ling silver mounting and new 
style hand strap. Very fine qual- 




ity— 



LECTURES AT 
MISSION CHURCH 

Rev. P. Wellander of StiH- 
waler Gives an Interest- 
ing Address. 

Rev. P. Wellander of Stillwater. 
Minn., gave an address last evening at 
the Swedish Mission church. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Second street. 
He was formerly pastor of the Swed- 
ish Mission church in Virginia, but 
last fall was transferred to Stillwater. 
Today he left for Virginia, where he 
will visit before returning to his work 
at Stillwater. 

The address given by Rev. Wellander 
was In connection with the annual 
church bazaar, which is now in prog- 
ress. The affair is very successful from 
a financial standpoint. 

A good program is given every night. 
Miss Anna Norain sang a solo and 
Misses Esther Ekholm and Nannie 
Erickson gave a piano duet. A quartet 
also gave several selections. 

Tonight Rev. Edward Erickson, pas- 
tor of the First Norwegian-Danish M. 
E. church will speak. 

The bazaar will close tomorrow 
evening. 

FORTY CHARTER MEMBERS. 

State Organizer of Good Templars 
Makes a Good Showing. 

Forty charter members of the new 
ledge of the International Order of 
Good Templars of the West end will 



$5.00 



A Gentleman's Umbrella, plain 
or with silver mounting, strong 
and durable — 



$6.00 



Two examples of the pur- 
chasing ability of a store of this 
character. 





Will Exchange Pulpits. 

Rev. Carl G. Olson, pas^tor of the 
Swedish Bethany Lutheran church. 
Twenty-third avenue west and Third 
street, will exchange pulpits Sunday 
with Rev. Freidenfelt, the temporary 
pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church 
at Billings Park, Superior. 

Rev. Mr. Freidenfelt is a theological 
student from St. Peter's seminary and 
is supplying the Superior pulpit until 
a regular pastor is secured. 

Will Plan for Future. 

Plans for the coming winter will be 
made this evening at a meeting of the 
church council of the Swedish Bethany 
Lutheran church at the church. 
Twenty-third avenue west and Superior 
street. The deacons and the trustees 
will be present. 

■ 

Benefit for Rescuers. 

For the benefit of those members of 
the Adams Athletic association, who 
were instrumental in saylig the lives 
of Thorwald F. Beherns and Joseph 
Symington, when they were marooned 
for four days on a floating Island last 
week, the association will give a dance 
at Lincoln park on Friday. Oct. ZZ. 
Beherns and Symington are members 
of the Adams association. Beherns is 
now able to be around. 

West End Shortrails. 

Georfie Crosby of 2612 West Fifth 
street has returned from a short busi- 
ness visit to Montivideo, Minn. 

Miss Anna Olson will entertain a 
number of her friends at her home. 
Twenty-sixth avenue west and Sec- 
ond street, this evening. 

Prayer services were held last even- 
ing at the Swedish M. S. church. 
Twentieth avenue west and Third 

Mrs! R. R. Forward will leave to- 
morrow for Nevada, where she will 
viPit friends and relative:?. 

Hi«s Hannah Olsen will entertain a 
Sunday school class of the First Nor- 
wegian-Danish M. E. church, at her 
home, 320 North Nineteenth avenue 
west, this evening. 

Miss Mayme Fested and Miss Mabel 
Peterson of St. Paul, whc have been 
visiting friends- In the West end for 
the past few weeks, will return to 
their homes Monday. 

Mrs. William Laughton of 2510 W^est 
Second street entertained the Ladies 
Guild of the St. Luke's Episcopal 
church at her home this afternoon. 

Frank Lyons of Marquette, Mich., 
is a business visitor at tie -West end 
today. He is registered at the Es- 
mond hotel. , ^ , 

Rev. Edward Erickson conducted 
praver services last evening at the 
First Norwegian-Danish M. E. church. 

Jacobson Bros., contractors, were 
awarded the contract for a one-story 
brick structure at 1024 West Superior 
street, to cost $6,000. It Is understood 
that a bank will occupy it. 

Mrs. Henrv Johnson, Mrs Gust Berg- 
quist and Mrs. A. F. Lundholm, all of 
the West end, have gon.j to Center 
Citv, Minn. Their father, J. P. Palm- 
qulst, is reported to be very low. 

Joseph Poissant is putting up a |1,- 
500 residence on the north side of Sec- 
ond street, between Twenty-sixth and 
Twenty-seventh avenues. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Robertson of 
Hayward, Wis., have returned to their 
home after a visit at the West end, 

John Nord started work this morn- 
ing on the construction of a modern 
residence, to cost $2,000, oi the north- 
west corner of Twenty-second avenue 
west and Third street. 

Mrs. Alfred Peterson of Coleraine, 
who has been visiting friends In the 
West end, has returned tc her home. 

John Hendrickson has returned to 
his home in Minneapolis after a visit 
at the home of Peter Olson, 2223 West 
Tenth street. 

Mrs. Gouch of the Eeast end gave a 



$1.25 New Kid Gloves for 89c 

500 pair Ladies" New $1.25 White 
Glace Kid Gloves, all si:'-e.s. Every 
pair guaran- #9|0 

teed, at the jyT_.. >^t_»^ 

great sale to- 4J i w , ^g mf$ Um€ £lFi4% 
morrow for ^^rtaKinAM_^^^r 

89c. ^^^■niTlimip^ 

26 West SuiJcrior Street. 



Known Since i08i5 

Jewelers and Silversmiths II 




FINE CLOTHING! 

'Tis true as gospel, that in buying The House of Kupen- 
heimer Clothes, you get more Style, more Value, more Satis- 
faction than in any clothes you can purchase. They are made 
in a particular way, for particular men; they have become 
known everywhere as "Correct Clothes for Gentlemen," not 
only because their style is undeniably correct, but because 
they are unmistakably the sort of garments that gentlemen 
wear and are proud to wear." 

Overcoats, Underwear, Wilson Bros.' Shirts and Latest 

Effects in Neckwear. 

CHAS* MORK, 

1920 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



'-#• 





|AVE you seen our stock of pianos? If not, you do not know 
whether we have any or not. Fact is, we have a large stock 
of the very finest makes to be found any place in the world. 
A carload of pianos does not last us many days. We are 

constantly receiving new ones direct from the factory. They 

are always new and fresh, most correct in style and tone. Our big 
buying facilities enables us to obtain choice instruments for least 
money. 

Some beautiful new grands just received by lake freight— $650, 
$750, $800 and $900. If you have not room for a grand, then our 
uprights are best and cheapest to be seen anywhere— $7oO downward. 
A Steinway $550, Ivers & Pond $450, Kranich & Bach $450, Golden- 
toned, never-wear-out Ludwig $375. One of world-renowned Starr 
Pianos $350, made by that old Quaker house, superintended by Ben- 
jamin Starr himself. You could not obtain more for your money if 
you went around the globe. 

Second Hand 

Pianos can be found in our stock, better than new. Some have been 
used so little and are just worked out nicely. Others have been used 
a great deal, but have been made perfect in our remodeling department^, 
and have splendid tone. We have one for $115.00-410 cash and $0 
per month. 

DuM music Co. 



t 



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c^ 



-^' 



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-*•- 



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i- 



222 West First Street. 



Duluth, Minn. 




750 yards of Silk- 
in 36-inch black taf- 
feta, worth $1.50; 
on sale special for — 

$1,00 



"WHERE VALUES REIQN SUPREME.' 




TICK 




00 



21-23 WEST SUt>ERIOR STREET. 




10 dozen new Lace 
Collars, worth from 
75c to 98c; on sale 
special tomorrow at 

50c, 59c 



Saturday's Special Offerings in 
Winter Needs at Reduced Prices 



Great Ready-to- Wear Values 

Commencing tomorrow we will show the most extraordinary suit 
values we have ever offered. These are suits received withm the past 
week and are made up in the very latest styles and fabrics, in a" the 
leading Fall colors and black. Make an effort to see these suits. Ihe 
prices are more than interesting values — 

$12.50, $15.50 and $21.50 

The New Moyenage One-Piece Dresses 

In broadcloth, serges, Panama and taffeta silk, handsomely made and 
trimmed, having all the latest fashion touches. Extra special values ai 

$11.50, $14.50 and $19.50 

New Fall Coats in Stunning Styles 

52 to 56 inches long, in fine broadcloths, man serge and coverts, 
some ^ fitted, showng the new pleated styles, others % and ff rm Jit- 
ting, man-tailored, lined throughout with guaranteed satin, the best 
values we have ever offered. Very special— 

$15.00, $19.50 and $25.00 

Buy Your Children's Coats Now 

Stock most complete, values unsurpassed. Children" Chinchilla Coats 
in fine quality, Venetian lined, emblem trimmed. Extra X^ ^Q 

special at ^^ * 

Children's Herringbone Cheviot Coats, flannel lined, col- <J J[ Q CT 
ors red, brown and navy, 6 to 14 years. Very special. ... V/F ^X. 17 *J 
An especially fine showing of furs in sets and separate pieces. The 
result of early buying and great care in the selection of skins, places us 
[n a strong position tl supply fur wants. We cordially invite you to look 
our fur stock over. You will find what will please you, and at a great 
saving in price. 



^naps in Fine 

Wool Blankets 

110 in the Lot 

They are all samples and worth 

double the prices we ask for them. 

Some are slightly soiled and others 

are perfect. You can buy — 

$5.00 Wool Blankets for...$3.50 

$6.00 Wool Blankets for. . . 3j;3.75 

$7.50 Wool Blankets for...$4.50 

$8.95 Wool Blankets for...$5.00 

$10.00 Wool Blankets for...$6.50 

$12.50 Wool Blankets for... $7.25 

Cotton Blankets 
at Bargains 

50c Cotton Blankets, pair.. 
75c Cotton Blankets, pair.. 
98c Cotton Blankets, pair.. 
$1.25 Cotton Blankets, 11-4. 
12-4 Cotton Blankets, worth 

larly $1.59— Sale 1^ | 

price SP J. • 

$2.50 fine Wool Finished 
ket, special to- tih ^ 

morrow V^ J. • 

$3.50 fine Wool Finished 
kets, on sale spe- 
cial for 



A 



. .43<» 
.59^ 

...$1 
regu- 



$2. 



Blan- 

75 

Blan- 

69 



i 

• 

1 








1 
! 

! 




1 





A Special Sale 
of Pillow lops 



1,000 Pillow Tops on sale to 
morrow at unheard of prices. 

35c and 50c stamped Pil- 
low Tops for 

50c and 65c stamped Pil- 
low Tops for 

25c stamped Pillow 
Tops, only 

65c and 75c stamped Pil- 
low Tops for 

$1.00 fine satin Pillow 
Tops for 

$1.50 fine silk velvet ve- 
lour Pillow Tops 



19c 
25c 
10c 
35c 
59c 
85c 



Gloves, Hosiery, Underwear 



GLOVES — Kayser's cashmere 
gloves, fleeced, ^ ^/^ 



at 



GLOVES— Kaysers silk lined 
cashmere gloves ^C^f* 

GLOVES— $1.25 kid gloves, in 
black and all col- tf* f /I /I 
ors, at ^ ± .\J\J 

Ladies' Hose, Burson's seamless, 
in black and oxford, ^ ^f* 

per pair ^\Jxy 

Children's Stocking Caps— a great 
variety at 50fi ^ ^{* 

Men's Night Shirts, made extra 
$1.00, 75< and 



Children's Sleeping Garments of 
heavy outing flannels ^/^^ 



at 



Childreu's 19c heavy 
ribbed fleeced hose at 



Children's fleeced 
boys and girls, all 
sizes 



15c 

Underwear for 

25c 

Ladies' 59c bleach ^f\r* 

Union Suits, ribbed .O L/C- 

75c Vests and Pants, ^/l/* 

the best val- 

25c 






fine combed cotton, 

Shawl Fascinators, 
ues in the city at 
75^, 50^ and 



full, good values at 



50c 




/ 



+ 



^ 



, 



_. . 



i«ipiwi'^^«ap 



i^ ijr nn 



«'■< r-n -, iTiM I 



;» 



r?lB 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD : iL JFRIH AY, OCTOBER 15. 1909. 





CONCE 





$iooo.^i 



\ 



Given for ftjti' .ClMan/ 
juiious to heallK found j 



e in- 
i(oo(l 




AT^. 



icMilting from the ii»e of 

Calumet f _ 
Baking P^ 
Powder 



ITI 



mm 



Lm\ 



William Norman Guthrie presented 
a ler-ture bpfore the members of the 
Twentieth Century club on Ibsen yes- 
terday afternoon at the clubroom of 
the library, and his discourse was a 
masterly eftori in giving wliat Mr. 
tJuthrle considers the ideal which Ibsen 
sought to present to the world in liis 
peries of thirteen social plays. That 
Ibsen was not railing against the in- 
stitution of matrimony nor insisting 
too strenuously upon the unfettered 
life of the individual, as so many su- 
perft'-lal students would have him. was 
brought out by the lecturer. Kai ler 
%% as the great dramatist insisting 
tlirough his art upon a higlier ideal of 
marriage — marriage founded upon 
etiualitv. i)assiun, mutual respect anrt 
a common effort to realize the ideals 
of lite and In a constant growtii. in 
everv one of his plays he has sno%yn 
the failure in marriage because ot ti;e 
lack of some one of these great nect-.s- 
sitie.s in making the i.leal lite pusssbie 
betwt-en a man and a wmian. 

A large number of club women were 

''"^This evening Dr. Guthrie will speak 
on the German drama at the high 
school. The plays spoken of 
I.essini;. •Natlian the Wise; 
•Egmont," -Iphigenie." "Faust 
ler. •William Tell "' 
mann Hensrhel;' 
dine and 



MISS MARJORIE GOULD MAY WED 

DUKE WITH A PEDIGREE LONGER 

THAN A BOSTON BENCH WINNER 



Hauptmann. 
Maeterlinck, 
I'alomldes." 



will be 

Goethe, 

; ■ Schil- 

Fuhr- 

■Alla- 



In Honor of Bride. 

Mrs. I.oulse OBrien of the Colonial 
has announced tlie engagement of her 
daughter. Miss Hannah O'Brien. t.j U. 
J Murdock of Fort William. Ont. The 
wedding will take place this month. 

Lust evening Mrs. .1. H. Free enter- 
tained at her home. 2i'9 Fifth avenue 
east at a parcel shower in honor ot 
Miss OBrien. The rooms were prettily 
decorated in American beauty roses and 
ferns, and a number of pretty gifts 
were presented tiie guest of honor, 
Tliose present were: 
Messrs. and Mesdames — 

H. X. Westaway 



T. .1. Walsh. 
Mesdames — 

George Murray 
of Superior. 

K. Tinny, 
Mlssos— 

Marv Garrity. 

tlertrude Gonska. 

Nellie O'Brien. 
Wess-rs. — 

B. Sexton. 



Charles OHagan. 
David O'Brien. 



M. Wolf, 
George Hutch- 
ings, 

.Arnold, 
.iuiia Judge, 
Laura Kluge. 

K. Petlie. 



Club. 



1. 

tion:} 



3. 

4 

5. 



countries 
.\mes 
is as 



rela- 



Saturday 

The regular niectiiii? "f ilie .Satur- 
day club will be held tomorrow aft- 
ernoon at the club roorn.s of ine li- 
brary. The half hour devoted to cur- 
rent" events news from the^ ^ 
w-iU be discussed with Mrs. C. C. 
as leader. The outline for studv 
fallows: p^^cHELIEU. 

Character, rise to power, 
with Louis XIII. 
Foreign policy. 

Mrs. Keyes. 
Attitude toward Huguenots. 
Attitude toward nobles. 
Reestablishes monarchy. 

Mrs. Steele. 
The intendants. » . , 

.. Financial, commercial, industrial 

policy. 

3 The thirty-years war. 
M!-s Ri'ickl'-htirst. 



6. 



Teachers' Reception. 

The teachers of the city will be 
guests of liomir at 



members ftf 
be the hosts. 
to be an an- 



cilv will oe the 
a reception 
Wednesday evening of "^xt week at 
the church parlors or the fir.-i 
Methodist church when the 
the Epworth league will 
This reception has come 
nual affair. 

A musical program w 
next Wednesday nignt in 
following will take part; 
Brown. Mi.ss Florence 
Culm*»r. Miss Luella Neft. 
Brown and a reading by 
Mae J.ihnson. The Ilev. 
J W Bratton will give 




THE DUKE OF ALBA. 
One London report says the duke of 
Alba is Maijorle Gould's 'beau." The 
duke was in constant attendance un 
Miss GouM at Marienbad last August. 
He followed the family to I'aris and 
renewed his attentions, and again later 
^when they went motoring in the Py- 
renee.s. The duke is a handsome man 
of <lark complexion. :U years old. and 
has the most distinguisiipd manners. 
He is a grandnephew of Empress Eu- 
genie; his grandmother was her sistfr. 
Empress Eugenie was fond of him and 
it is expected that she will leave him 
a large part of her private fortune, 
one of tlie greatest in Europe, so he 
cannot be accused of loving the .-Amer- 
ican dollar more than .American beau- 
ty. The duke also has a large prop- 
erty In Spain, where he maintains a 
great estate. .Vn American girl un- 
used to titles would pass much time In 
memorizing all those the duke bear.s. 
He possesses six dukedoms and ten 
mar-iuisates. He is a t ount fourteen 
times over and hereditary constable of 
Navarre, an honor wiiiih gives him tlie 
higliest standing even in tlie republic 
of France. 



History." 
course wi 



The second lecture 
U be i<iven (Jet. 29. 



the 




ciiev- 

diffi- 

at the 



enough to Insist on some nort of unity 
in the meeting of lines of wales and 
suipes Tays the November Delineator 
A diagonal is a material rhat can not 
be irn to itself m cutting without dire 
results. It has to be matched at one 
place and bullied at another until it 
presents almost as vexing a problem 
Ls a p aid. These new chevron diagon- 
als however, present a v-ry salisfac- 
for'y sathough somewhat expensive 
solution of the difficulty. The stripes 
or wales are brought togeUier in 
ron angles so that there is lUtle 
culty in handling them tiven 
many seams of the new coats. 

Another new material that •« ''O'^R 
used to some extent for both suit.s and 
rii-eqsps is the fllette weiive of serge 
andThevilt'' The cloth is woven with 
an occasional surface thread ot a 
fighter color than the foundation ma- 
terial itself 1 saw some very smart 
suits made in different woolen mater- 
ials of the filette weave at an English 
tailor shop just a few days ago. One 
of them was in dark green serge with 
the filette tliread in a lighter, shade 
of the same color. Both the skirt and 
had the moyen-age yoke line 
hlD The lower part of the 
gored, and the deep yoke 
buttoned down over it at each seam 
wth small tabs With the suit was a 
wi'i^t'oT'dark green Bengallne silk 
cut out in a square yoke at the necK 
over a chemisette of lighter Kreen n^ • 
The neck opening was trimmed wlUi 
stitched bands ending in labs liKe 

" AnotTer^'mateHa,. that has recently 

ts appearance amor g more elab- 

tailoi-made suits and separate 

is a fine r'^^ed velvet. 

and more pliable than 

.so heavy .«;Ltber In 

Tt nomps in - woxiderfui 

^ burgumU-.-iand the light, al- 



To antici- 
pate your 
Glot'es for 
Christmas 
gifts during 
this sale 

would praise 
a most prof- 
itable j)re- 
caution. 



I 



^ 



^\^-- 






>^ 



'*^f 



if/ 



.»•».•, 



^J I' 



^ 



fi 






■^^ 



These two 
items of such 

extraordin- 
ary values are 

offered for 
this one day 

on I y^ from 
8:30 /Satur- 
day tuorniny 
until 9:30 in 

the evening. 



tiie coat 
below the 
skirt was 



Tomorrow, Saturday, Oct. Seventeenth 

ice will ifiaiigurate a glove sale zvJiich in point of actual 
value-giving is tinprecedented in the annals of Dulutli 
glove selling — 

50 dozen Women's Fleece $2.00 Glace Mousquetaire Kid 

Gloves, of superior quality with three beautiful, self-colored pearl 

clasps—absolutely the most correct style for dress wear-perfect fitting 

' and every pair guaranteed— for this one days great selling, a pair— 



made 

orate 

coats 

softer 

and not 

rib. 

ors. deep 



It Is 

corduroy 

weight or 

wine-col- 



moit white, sh ades ^ oT s auterne. 

BUSV; LIVES 

Among WoSin of English 
Middle Class. 



$1.00 



has been 



A i^risk discussiyu nas oeeu started 
in the columns of t»»e London Spec- 

nl urcdly but vVry unfavorably, the 
me of the girls uv England as com- 
nired with her -own. at home, espe- 
^fali? tiie'generai. »|^>fi'';enoy of the 
former contrasted.^vl^h the 
ties and capal>ilities 6T the 
says the New York Sun. 
One of the women wlio 
sustains aer 



varied du- 
"Colonlals," 



her own 



challenges 

argument 

experience 

fair speci- 

witli a fam- 



the 

her judgment 

by an account of . 

and occupation.s. It she is a 

niPti of the "middle class. 

nv income of $-'.400 to $4,800 a year 

American girls in the same 

famlliv may envy her accomplishments 

Here is a list of some 

she says are "fewer 

manv of my friends 

aneef." She Is a 

has -turned out a .— - *,.,>rn a 

of socks." , She "took lesson.s f.om a 

nundress" and "for year*^ did all 

fine work of that sort.^tiOuding 

and <ollars. for a small f-.ymy 

She has the "St. .lohn s 
Mpdal. taklns al^jD the 



sort of 
ments. 
of them, which 
than those of 
and acquaint 
"needlewoman" who 
oonsid?rable number 



500 Pairs Women's Fine $1.25 Two Clasp, White Glace 
Gloves, the dress weight, beautifully finished with pearl clasps, all 
sizes and every pair guaranteed, for this very special one days great 
selling, a pair — 



89c 



Uwiiini 



26 West Superior Street. 



of 



ers 
lance 



Kensington cerj.ifiiajes- fn hygiene 
physiolugy." :,and jrii«,.jl'i'::n ^^''' 



MISS 



ill be given 

which the 

Miss Ruth 

Webb, Miss 

Miss Nell 

Miss Agnes 

M. S. Mice and 

informal talks. 



married 
married 



Sioux 

today 

anni 

.1 

Mr 

the 

life in 

in 1859 



Golden Wedding. 

Mr and Mrs. W. J. Uavvson of 
Ciiv, Iowa, arrived in the city 
to "spend their fiftieth wedding 
versarv with their daughter. Mis .1. 
H Free of 229 Fifth avenue east 
and Mrs. Dawson have spent 
greater part of their 
the West. Thev were 
It Ivanhoe, Lee countv. 111. -They have 
ftvp daugliters and one son living and 
hlt-e ten grandchildren. Mr. Dawson 
13 a velerin of the Civil war having 
served as a corporal in Company I. 
Fifteenth Illin ois I nfan try regiment. 

Ferris-O'Hagan. 

The wedding of Miss Claire Ferris 
Charles O'Hagan both of this cit> 
been announced. The wedding 
place Saturday morning of last 
the Bishop's residence and 



Luncheon. 

Mr.~. T. J. David will entertain at 
luncheon tomorrow at her home. 1601 
London road, in compliment to her 
guest. Mrs. David Davis of Lewistown, 
Mont. 



This treatment pre- 



Palestine Assembly. 

The members of Paiesiine assembly 
will entertain this pvening at the first 
danfing partv of the series to be given 
during the winter. The affair will be 
given at the ballroom of the Masonic 
Temple. 

t^ersonal Mention. 



and 
has 
took 
week 



at 



the announcement comes as 

to Mr. and Mrs. O'Hagan - 

thia ritv Thev will 

this cit>. west Second street for 



a stirprise 

friends in 

at home at 



the Colonial 
a time. 



on 



History Lecture. 

a series of si.x 

the members of 

Century club was given 

Henrv F. Greene at the 

the library. Mr. Oreene'-s 

The Mythical Period of 



The first lecture in 
to be presented before 
the Twentieth 
this xnorning by 
club room of 
subject was 



Miss 
R. I., 
ardson 



Rosalind Longley of Pawtucket. 

a visiting Miss Katrina Rich- 

of 25i5 East Second street. 

• • * 

Mrs J. H. Free of 2l"J Fifth avenue 

east lias as iier guests her parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. i. Dawson of Sioux 

City 



and Mrs. 
Iowa. 

* • 

The Itev. and Mrs. 
leave tomorrow for 
spend the winter. 

* • 

Bishop and Mrs. J 
returned from Sioux 
they attended the annual meeting 
the Sixth misisionary department 



* 
J. L. Murphy will 
Bristol. Tenn., to 



l>. Morrison have 

Falls Is'. D., where 

of 

of 



all that is loose 
vents sticking. 

Decorated china plates should be put 
away with round pieces of Canton flan- 
nel between tliem. 

New boots, which sometimes do not 
take a good polish, should be rubbed 
over with a cut lemon before blacking. 
A cut raw potato will also serve the 
purpose, although the lemon is prefer- 
able. 

When a valuable niece of music be- 
gins wearing out along the edges, you 
will be able to preserve it much longer 
If vou bind tlie ragged edges with pas- 
separtout. After applying the binding 
pr*>3s tht sheet with a warm iron. 

L'o not wash colored clothes In the 
same water with all-white ones. This 
especially Iiolds good if 
to have table linen with 
ders. 

Have vou ever tried adding a t^a 
spoonful" of paraffin to every galloi 
of water when boiling white 
is «:iid to be excellent for 
stains. 

Uemeinher gooi tools make rapid 
work. If you do not own a good 
sharpener, wliich you can use 
prove xour steel blades, not ruin them, 
as is tlie usual amateur sharpener's 
method, make arrangements for your 
knives to be sharpened by 
sional ever^- two weeks. 



the 
shirts 
broth- 
Ambu- 
South 
and 
to dU 
klr''^i3M»''*n»irSl/fe in" her 
"cau make jams and pukles 
hams aiad b.ucon. etc.. and 
hat," t^Iie cannot make a 
dress. " but knows "several women who 
make all th^ clothing ■^<^?;„VnT"''/Jerv 
and their children.' ^^^^^'.f^^li 
clean' that comes around, she 
I varnish and palU and enamel, 
does every woman that i 
These varied capabilities have 



practicallv 
iiome. She 
and pickle 
"can trim a 



•spring 
says, 
and so 
know." 



,ire they prac- 
either physical 



not been acquired, fior 
ticed. at the expense of 
or mental diversions: 

■1 have mv recreations equall> v. nil 
the Colonial" woman. I ride, dance 
cycle play tennis, photograph, and 
know how to handle a golf club, in 
common with most of the women and 
Kirls of mv acquaintance. I like a 
good novel, too. in English or French; 
German and Italian, also, when leisure 



ers strange mood before the horse 
liad plunged into the half open gate. 
Camfleld was a l^'sure-lovlng young 
fellow who was accustomed to tane 
.U'°lwn" Um^ at everything and h^ 
home-comings from tlie ,^^astons 
where his visits had become i-u.-.pi- 
eiousU- frequent ot late— had alwaNs 
been marked by a happy good-humo. 
tliat proved infectious 
who never quite und* 
badinage. It puzzled 
that any one could 
Lucia Gaston with a 

He turned the problem over and ner 
again, but to no purpose. Moto liow- 
ever was only a boy. and a boy is 
rareiy appreciative of the calamitous 
effects of a lovers' quarrel. 

At the door of his 
turned to the lad 
him softly down 

"Well, Moto. 

"My go 
— my go?' 

The very 



NOTICE. 



The 
ceived 
fancy 
I..amb 



Duluth Fur Company has re- 
a large shipment of very fine 
i,kins— Alaska Seal. Persian 
dyed and natural plucked 
Otter skins — in addition to the large 
stock of assorted skins wliich we 
ha.l, all of the finest quality, 
your new fur garments now ; 
the choice skins, before you 
your old furs repaired and r 
eled Come and get our prices. We 
are manufacturers and can save 
you money. Prices reasonaole. qual- 
ity considered. 

Dulutti Fur Co., 



Order 
and get 
have 
and remod 



the E^scopal churcli. 

* • • 

Mrs. Florence Prentice of Minne- 
apolis is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Lindberg of this city for the 

winter. 

« • * 

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Davis of 1601 Lon- 
don road have as their guests, Mr. and 
Mrs David Davis cf L'>wi3town, Mont. 

♦ * » 

Mrs E. Weatherhead of 475 Mesaba 
avenue has returned from Hayward, 

Wis. 

m 

Household Hints. 

Soak caulillower an hour before 
cooking. Put into boiling water, to 
whicl' a tablesnoonful of salt is added. 
Boil from twenty to thirty minutes, 
afccording to sixe of head. 

After greasing pans for small cakes, 
dust with Hour thickly, shaking out 



one happens 
colored bor- 



clothes'? It 
removing 



knifi 
to im- 



a profes- 



permits. 

The South 
her sojourn 
English girl 
travel. To 
reply that 
lishwomen 



African lady has found in 

but ♦i'lie instance of an 

wlio -ttad sa.ved money for 

whipli her critic "would 

there are hundreds of Eng- 

less well paid than their 



LrADIGSI 



want the latest 
I've ju.sl returned 
am now prepared 



in Hair- 
from the 
to dress 



Do you 
dressing".' 

East and _ . . . „ 

your hair the Knellnh, PnH«, or Mop 

Style, which is so much the rage. Trim 
niings of all descriptions 



to match. 

Miss Kelly. 



THE SUIT CLOTHS. 

The Materials That Are 
Fashionable. 



Colonial sisters laying aside rnoney 
laboriously, month ^>' month, for a 
glimpse one day at some 'promi.sed 
land.' But just as the Colonial visits 
England, the Old Courtry.' the Eng- 
lishwoman's desire is toward the lands 
vet more ancient than her own— the 
lands that have made history and hold 
its treasures." 

"(Masses" are not so distinctly de- 
fined in our land as in Kngland. and it 
would not be easy tc determine to 
what group this lady. who. very fitly. 
Signs herself "Housekeeper." wouid. on 
this side, be assigned. V.'e believe there 
are numerous American women, mar- 
ried or unmarried, whose energy, in- 
dustry and intelligence match hers, 
though the product of these qualities 
may differ. In any ca.-e, we are con- 
fident that our readers will agree with 
us that the picture pre.sented by the 
correspondent of the Spectator is 



even to Moto. 
• rstood all liis 
the brown boy 
come away from 
•mad" like that. 



room Camfleld 
who had followed 
the hall. , ^ 

what is it?" he asked. 
Miss Gaston's— this my day 
he asked anxiously, 
name seemed to 



rouse 



and 
a 



wholesome and 



delighfiil. 

• 



Camfield's hostility. 

••No; you cant go to Miss Gaston 9 
today" he replied peremptorib. 
•Saito is leaving me this morning 
there's work enough here to keep 
dozen busy." , , , , 

Moto lowered his black eyes dis- 
creetly and his genial smile quickly 
faded. ,. , ^ . 

"Well. nen. no go." he acquiesced 
with assumed cheerfulness and hurried 
about his chores. 

In spite of hi.s brave show of un- 
concern Moto felt the gnawing of a 
great disappointment. He had never 
failed Mhss Gaston. Twice a week tor 
three months he had trotted happily 
and punctually across the intervening 
beet ranches to lier big white house, 
where she gave him a welcome all out 
of proportion to his importance, and 
for a wonderful half hour coached 
him in the English he was trying so 
hard to master. 

For Moto Hackasona had the consum- 
ing ambition of his race. He did 
purpose spending his life in the 
fields like so many of his companions. 
no>- even in the running of errands for 
so beloved a personage as Billy Cam- 
field He hoped, some time, to be 
interpreter. An interpreter was 
very great man in Moto's eyes 
did" not have to sleep 
other men. nor work 



never came to his lessons without some 
little token of his regard for her — a 
blossom picked by the wayside, or a 
trifle of some sort inveigled from his 
countrymen in the fields and carrying 
with it a whiff of his native land. Her 
beauty and patience and sweetness made 
a trinity Lefore whose shrine he pros- 
trated hiin.self in ardent worship. 

Now that he liad been peremptorily 
denied the pleasure of his usual pil- 
grimage to her. he cast about for some 
means to alleviate her disappointment 
which, witii a boy's perversity, he in- 
sisted on measuring in terms of his 
own. The morning was half gone be- 
fore he iiad his inspiration. It came 
to liim like all inspirations should 
come — in a fiasii. He would write lier 
an excuse! 

He hastened away to his room and 
wrote long and dubiously. When the 
letter was done he signed it in his own 
language, folded It with inflnite pains 
and gave it to Saito, who was to pass 
the Gastons on his way to town, im- 
pressing that stolid menial with the 
importance of its prompt delivery. 
Having discharged his tremendous so- 
cial obligation, he went about his 
tasks with cheerfulness that was not 
altogether assumed. 



not 
beet 



THE EVENING STORY 



used so much 

that I wonder 

of the chevron 

have come to 

the rescue of more than one perplexed 

tailor wliose customers are wise 



Diagonals are being 
this fall for coat suits 
more has not been said 
diagonal materials that 



Iniporlem au«l 

:tar. wkst 

Zenith 'Phone e::4. 



Mann fact urers 
FIRST ft>T. 
Old 'Plioue 10^7- 



I, 




AT COST. 

Remember, for a short time only, 
in order to adverti>e my place ot 
business, I will furnish you glasses 
at cost, and charge you nothing 
for examination. 



Hariand B. 



105 West First Street. 



Stbbttf 



5 West^uperior St. 

TTeXCL L'S I KA .1/ 1 LI' I .v'ft KY. . 



THE ETIQUEITE OF 
MOTOJAKASONA 

By \V. C. Estabi'ook. 



(Copyrlglited. 
Billy Camfleld 



sona called "a 

the moment he 

for that irate young 

came tearing down tlie 

neck speed. But the 



All rlglits restrveil.) 
had w lat Moto Haka- 
mad." Moto knew It 
ran to open 



the 



gate 
;entleman. wlio 
lane at break- 
little .lap had 
white and 



had been 

fault — she 

perverse — 

now, she 

had been 

part in it 

time since she 



All 
who 



Classic Models 



COVKRKn 
trimmed 



WITH SIKK OR VELVET and 

with feathers or flowers. Then 
we have numerous creations in Beaver 
Hats. 

FEI.T H\TS are montly trImBied, or rather 

swathed with sashes, silks and ribbons, which 
in some cases completely eclipse the founda- 
tion model. 

Our Sixe-RHBRe of Hat« runs from the Tiny 
Toque to the large Picture Hat with th« 
Gainsborough lines. 



never seen his employ<'r so 

"-■tern nor had he ever known him to 

lide with such dare-de /il recklessness. 

The horse swerved against the half- 
ouen gate, reared and then, at the un- 
accustomed sting of the whip, plunged 
forward, crashing his slender legs 
through the out-swinging bars, 

Camfleld loosed himself from the 
stirrups by a quick leap just as his 
horse went down. 

For a strenuous te i minutes they 
worked desperately to free the terri- 
fied beast from his entanglements, 
Camfleld giving : ovdfeis and laboring 
"hugely, while Moto bounced about him 
like a" cork on a riffle. 

When the broken gite was at last 
removed the horse was unable to get 
to his feet. Moto went to the stables 
for the groom, who brought blankets 
and straw for bedding:. A veterinary 
surgeon was sent for and most of the 
Camfli'ld household spent the rest of 
the night hovering over the beloved 

animal. , ^, , . „ , 

At daybreak, vxf^-n the horse had 
been made comfe>r<al>:e. Camfleld left 
the group of stAbleiasn and entered 
the house. His Ta^e 1 ad relaxed none 
of its sternness. To Moto. who kept 
watching him closely, there was some- 
thing vastly mysterious in his unusual 
demeanor. The qtrlek eye of »»»« •»« 
had acquainted him v.'^ith his emplo>- 



in flo- 
at a 

Cam- 

•he's 

only 



an 
a 
He 
in a tent with 
from dawn to 
dark. He had his own little oftice. 
wliere his countrymen sought him out 
and poured their wishes and their 
woes into his ears. Sometimes he 
even went to the wiiite man s dignified 
court and translated the testimony of 
warring witnesses, but more fre- 
ciueiitly he became attorney, judge and 
jury all In- one and settled his com- 
patriots' troubles as he saw fit. 
this Moto knew because his uncle, 
had brought him to America, was in- 
terpreter for the Japanese railroad 
construction gang only a few; m'l^? 
away It was with his uncle that 
Moto had hoped to study the language 
of "odds and ends." but a construc- 
tion camp, measured by even the 
Japanese standard, is not a nice place 
for a boy, and the uncle had prornptly 
seen to it that his nephew was p aced 
where better influences were likely to 

^'^Wheii Camfleld learned of the lad's 
aspirations he immediately consulted 
Lucia Gaston about him. and since the 
affair between himself and that charin- 
ine young woman had reached the 
acute stage where mutual interests are 
rather easily Invoked. Moto's 
duction could not have happened 
more propitious time. , 

"He's like all the rest of em, 
field explained enthusiastically, 
as briglit as a dollar and tht 
trouble is he can't talk quite as PlAi".\> 
as our daddy dollar does; but bell 
learn quick enough, as you 11 flnd out. 
I haven't got any time to waste on 
the little beggar's education 
tell the truth. I'm getting a 
with having to always say things witn 
my mouth and then repeat thera on 
mv fingers.'" 

So Miss Gaston, who 
doing things for people, 
taking Moto in hand, 
mensely amused at first by h s queer 
foreign ways and by the uniqueness 
of the few ideas he was capable of ex- 
nressing. Her amusement, however, 
soon gave way to a genuine interest 
in the lad. who absorbed knowledge in 
a sponge-like fashion. „ , ^ ,i,^ 

Moto was just turned 17. He had the 
smooth nut-brown skin peculiar to his 
oeople. their black, wideawake eyes 
tneir coarse raven liair and their per- 
--opal wholesomeoess and clean iness. 
He possessed a certain fine chivalry— a 
delicate sense of appropriateness 
where women were concerned. His aa- 
ulation for his teacher found expres 
3ion in a score of charming 



II. 

Not till Lucia Gaston had stared a 
«econd time througli the note that 
Saito had left for her did she seem to 
grasp its full import, and then she sud- 
denly turned white and faint. How- 
ever she was not a girl who faltered 
when she thought there was urgent 
need of her, and five minutes later sh^ 
was mounted on her swiftest liorse 
and whirling along the road to Cam- 
fields. 

What a silly quarrel it 
after all! And it was her 
had been so provokingly 
she could see It plainly 
thought, with a sob. She 
heartily ashamed of her 
every moment of the 
had heard his hor.se go pounding away 
down the road. And she had let her 
lover go like that: He was so gentle, 
so noble, so good: She might have 
known that something dreadful was 
sure to happen him. She deserved 
everytiiing that she was now suffer- 
ing In her woman's unreasonableness 
she forgot that Camfleld had taken a 
most animated interest in the quarrel. 
And so she rode to his home Pi"ng 
selt-reproach upon self-reproach till 
she was utterly debased and Bliiy 
Camfleld was lifted to a place among 
the veiy angels. 

'^'^A^t" he"/' unexpected appearance Cam- 
field's coolness deserted him. ne 
flushed and bowed awkwardly 
his rare good humor and 
her asserted themselves 
"Lucia:" he cried. 



door wide drew her within. 

•'I thought-^oh — I thougiit — " she 
cried. Incoherently, and sank sobbtng 
into the nearest chair. !. 

"Yot*? thought what?" he "^slCed. 
amazed at her tears and slipping hi.s 
arms about her. 

The sudden reversion of feeling, the 
pa.«5sing of an Expected ordeal for 
which sue had nerved herself, had 
completely undone here. For answer 
she look Moto's crumpled note from 
her pocket and gave it to him. 

Camfield smoothed It out and read: 

'I can not tlie day your .hou«e 
come Mistr Kain has a big mad he 
makes a hurl his horse on he makes a 
sick he makes a bad sick he makes a 
two leg hui't I have a sad that 1 can 
not to come. Moto Hakasona." 

There was a moment before Camfleld 
understood and then his risibilities 
overcom.o hlni. 

•It was the horse's legs, not mine 
dear," he cliuckled, jipasmodically. 

After one of those delirious inter- 
vals of reconciliation that make a r«a! 
quarrel eminently worth while Cam- 
field called Moto. 

"What do you mean by writing a 
letter like this and frightening Mlus 
Gaston half to death?" he demanded 
sternly. 

The little Jap looked at him blankly 
and then turned to Miss Gaston with 
sudden hopefulness. 

'1 no come — 1 make excoose — ex- 
coose all light, eh?' he piped anxious- 
ly, and then seeing, Gaston's irrepres- 
sible smile, imagined that he was be- 
ing made fun of and scuttled out of 
the room. 

"It was awfully ambiguous, though," 
murmured Miss Gaston with a bluah 
and looking tenderly at the little note. 

"But wonderfully efficious, don't 
you think?" asked Camfield. drawing 
lier to him. 

•'It — It does seem so," she admitted, 
submissively. 



his 



Then 
love for 



and opening the 



UNTAMABLE TAS.MANIAN WOLF. 

London Globe: About a.s untamable 
an animal as ever came into captivity 
has been added to the collection this 
week in the form of a Tasmanian 
wolf. The new arrival, the first of its 
kind received for a long time, hates 
mankind with a deathless haired and 
makes no pretense of gentler feelings 
It lies coiled up in the remotest corner 
of its den all day, even the offer of 
food being an excuse for an outburst 
of boundless fury. 

The tiger of the southern continent 
owes humanity little gratitude. There 
ha.s been war between them since they 
first met. Somewhat smaller than a 
wolf In size, with a doglike face, a 
long tapering, tall and in color gray- 
ish brown, with the hinder part 
the hack and loins marked bv black 
cross bards, the thylaclne, to 
its scientific name, is a very 
animal. 



of 

give It 

distinctive 



and, to 
trifle bored 



was forever 

insisted on 

She was im- 



He 



CHI-NAMEL 
DEMONSntATION 

No'W Going On at the 
KELLEY HARDWARE CO. 

Do not fail to come and see 
just how this cheapest, simplest 
and most easily applied of all 
stains and varnishes is used. 

Staining, Graining, Varnishing. 
ONE OPERATION! 



1 KELLEY HARDWARE CO 



-f 



i- 






t 



f^~r' f - ~y:?"a»fc ^ io <.^ >-- 



DULUTH. 



minn: 



!-OjR MONtV DA(?.K'lt N.>'r 















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THINKS BARRILL 
STORY IS A FAKE 

Friend of Guide and of Cook 

Doubts Authenticity of 

the Affidavit 

Hartford, Ark.. Oct. 15. — James A. 
Bolen, a coal mining operator well 
known in the Southwest, and who says 
he has hunted with the companion 
who made the Mount McKinley trip 
with l>r. Cook, is credited with declar- 
ing: here today that he did not believe 
Edward Barrill had signed the Mount 
McKinley affidavit credited to him In 
the storv sent out from New York. 

Mr. Bolen is president of tlie Bolen- 
Darnell Coal company of McAlester, 
Okla.. and was in Hartford today on 
business. He formerly lived in Kan- 
sas City. 

When Dr. Cook lectured at Kansas 
City on Oct. 7. Mr. Bolen met and 
talked with him. Mr. Bolen was cred- 
ited wltli having-, during that inter- 
view, told I»r. Cook a story of the 
Mount McKinley trip of exploration 
that had been related to him by Dr. 
Cooks guides, Barrlll and Fred Printz. 

To the Associated I'ress liere today 
Mr. Bolen declared he did not believe 
Barrlll had signed the affidavit cred- 
ited to him. Mr. Bolen agreed to fur- 
nl.<!h a statement of the story he had 
told l»r. Cook at Kansas City as re- 
lattd to him by the explorer's guides. 



ARE JAILED 

FOR VAGRANCY 

PoKce WiO Investigate Rec- 
ords of Men Arrested 
on Suspicion. 

George Storms and John J. Murphy, 
arrested at the union station yesterday 
by five policemen, pleaded guilty in 
police court this morning to vagrancy 
and were given ten days each In the 
county jail. This will allow the police 
time to investigate their records. They 
are suspected of having been connected 
with the robbery of the Sandstone Na- 
tional bank and it is possible that they 
may be connected with other crimes 
that have recently been committed in 
this part of tlie state. 



to A 
now. 
ing: 



Money Come* In BaneheM 

A. Chisholm of Treadwell. N. Y-. 
His reason is well worth read- 

"For a long time I suffered from 
indigestion, torpid liver, constipation, 
nervousness, and general debility," he 
writes "I couldn't sleep, had no appe- 
tite nor ambition, grew weaker every 
day' in spite of all medical treatment. 
Then used Electric Bitters. Twelve 
bottles restored all my old-time health 
and vigor. Now I can attend to busi- 
ness everv dav. It's a wonderful medi- 
cine." Infallible for Stomacli, Liver 
Kidneys, Blood and Nerves. 50c at all 
Druggists. 




— Select Your — 

FALL SHOES 

'% Now at Our New Store 



n(" West Su- 
iQ perior St. 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 






We are prepared to show 
you the new Fall Models 
and Stvles. right from the hands of the best makers ior 
Men, Women and Children. 



Young Men's 
Shoes 

The young men who want 
the swagger effects in Fall i 
Footwear can satisfy their 
longings here right now. 

Smart fall stvles in a va- 
riety of leathers, blacks and | 
new winter colors, military \ 
heels or regular, Blucher or 
button styles — 

$3.50, $4.00 to $6.00. 

School Shoes 

Or dress Shoes for boys and 
girls, a large selection in 
regular, and the new high 
cuts — all are here at — 

$1.50 to $4.00. 



Women's New 
Styles 

We have made great prep- 
arations at our store for the 
coming season, and are 
showing all the new models 
in Street Boots, Dress Boots, 
Ties, Patent and Black 
Suede Pumps and Slippers, 
one, two or three-strap. 

We have a wonderful ar- 
ray of the best that's made 
in Footwear for all purposes, 
from the moderate price to 
the best shoe luxury — 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50, 
$4.00 and $5.00. 

We have just received a 
large shipment of Sorosis 
Shoes, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR WARM SHOES. 

Wieland Shoe Co 

The Sign of the Golden Shoe. 
115 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 





/• 



Hirsh^ Wickwire & Co^s 

Overcoats, Ulsters, 
Suits and Cravenettes 

$22.50 to $50.00 

The garments that will please you, fit you and give you comfort. 
Extra quality. 

J^ iS ui'eweri dt Co 

304 West Superior Street. 



"When You Think of Heaters, 
Gome to the Kelly Hardware!" 

You will get a better stove and 
IT WILL COST YOU LESS! 

Just bear that in mind when you 
get ready to buy! 



KELLEY 



V G K - 1 r, -N OT S A-ri SF » E O: 



■4 ,> Of?v'..#-.'?.l.St--<-'4 '*'■ ^'y.'.'-i.i.'y'- 



COMES BACK 




ATULRICH 

Maurice Thompson Writes of 

Curley's Trip to Cattle 

Country. 

Says He Had the Superior 

Fighters All But 

Out. 



In a letter to The Herald, Maurice 
Thompson, who has fought Young Cor- 
bett, Harry Lewis, Willie Fitzgerald 
and Charlie Neary, besides a long 
string of less known fighters, com- 
plains that when Curley Ulrich re- 
turned from tlie "cattle" country' of 
Montana, lie forgot to tell the real 
truth reg;arding his meeting with the 
author ot tlie letter. 

Tliompson incloses a clipping from 
the Miles City Independent, in which 
tliat paper states tliat it was simply the 
holding on and stalling of Ulrich tliat 
prevented liim from being knocked out 
bv Thompson. 

The paper goes on to state that 
Thompson had all the best of the 
fight, and after the twelfth round 
Curlev simply hung on and prayed for 
the bell. Ulricli was knocked down 
four times, according to the clipping, 
and was a badly beaten man after the 
twelftli round. 

In his letter, Thompson says in part: 

"Seeing an article in your issue of a 
recent date on Ulrichs success on his 
recent invasion of tlie 'cattle' country. 
I wuuld like to say a word in my be- 
lialf. 

"Dr. Donohue, who refereed the fight 
at Glendive, gave me the hooks right. 
I don't want you to think that I am 
making a holler because I lost the de- 
cision. You will see by the inclosed 
clipping what they think of the fight 
out here. Curley claimed that tiie 
gloves were too large. Now, I had 
Curlev on the mat so often that i. 
made Hans Wagner's batting average 
look like Rube Waddell's average 
an off year. 

"I issue a challenge to any 13 



pound man In th^ country. X will take 
Curley on at 142 pounds, the weight we 
boxed at before, and I wi 1 let him 
furnish his own gloves. I will fight 
him for any kind of a bet; in fact, I 
will fight Ulrich for car fare to a 
I>utch picnic. 

"MAURICE THOMPSON. 
The clipping that accomjianies the 
letter states that the fight was cut and 
dried for Ulrich, an.l^^that he was given 
the decision to trim the men from 
Miles City and Bufte. There was a 
bunch of money wagered on the result 
of the fight, according to the clipping, 
and the decision was framed to get tho 
money of a lot of sports who backed 
Thompson. 

TIGERS TOllEET 
BLAINE ALUMNI 



Mullin, the greatest man in Detroit 
at this moment, will pitch his fourth 
game of the series. 

The sale of reserved seats for to- 
morrow's game started today and there 
were many long lines of people pur- 
chasing tickets for tomorrow. 



Travers Wins. 

Mont Clair, N. J., Oct. 15. — In match 
play at the Mont Clair Golf club's 
grounds today, Jerome D. Travers, 
Mont Clair, twice national champion, 
defeated R. T. Allen, FoxhiUs, 3 up 
and 2 to go. 

ZEUYA PLANS 
TO CRUSH REBELS 



on 



Established for 21 Years. 



Di oyoism 




It's a safe rule to first choose 
3'our store. There are all kinds 
of FURS offered for sale — good, 
bad and indifferent — each ven- 
der trying to make a sale, irre- 
spective of qtiality or responsi- 
bility. The store that has had a 
long and honorable record in 
mantifacturing fine FURS is 
surelj' the safest place to select 
your FURS. Each succeeding 
year has found R. KROJAN- 
KER, the reliable furrier's lines 
of FURS to be the choicest in 
the Northwest. We select only 
the choicest skins. That's why 
FURS bought of R. KROJAN- 
KER, the reliable furrier, al- 
ways prove satisfactory. Wheth- 
er it is a small neckpiece or an 
Alaska seal coat, there is the 
same perfection of quality, style 
and workmanship. If we have 
not the article or garment re- 
quired, we have the skins to 
make up what yoit want. The 
prices are consistent with qual- 
ity. 

Look over the splendid line 
we are showing of: 

Pony Coats, from 24 to 50 
inches long. 

River Mink Coats, from 24 to 
50 inches long. 

Caracul and Near Seal Coats. 

We also have a complete and 

fine line of FUR SETS. 

BInok I.ynx, v^ith - Ruatiian 
Mliaivl to match. 

Blnt'k fux, with KuMMinn Mhawl 
Xn iiinteh. 

iKnbella Fox, \rith RuNnian 
Mhawl Xi» match. 

niack AVolf, with RuKMlau 
Mha^vl X» match. 

Blue Wolf, Tvlth KiiNNian Mha^fl 
to match. 

Black Marten, Tilth RuHsian 
ithaivl to match. 

.\incrican Marten, ivith Rus- 
Hian Mhaxvl to match. 

RuKNian Marten, ivlth Mbavi'I to 
match. 

Mink, with Russian shawl to 
matclu 

Baiim Marten, Alaska Sable 
and many other sets too numer- 
ous to uientlou. 

We also sell separate neck- 
pieces and muffs. 

All sets come with cither pil- 
low or rug muffs. 

You are cordially invited to 
inspect our IMMENSE LINE 
OF FURS. 

We also have the finest facili- 
ties for remodeling and repair- 
ing furs and have installed the 
latest machinery for executing 
all orders on short notice. 



io iCrolainiBciir, 

THE RELIABLE FURRIER. 
4 East Superior St., upstairs. 



Stiff Football Match Will Be 

Played at Superior 

Sunday. 

Sunday afternoon the Irving Tigers 
will line up against the Blame Alumni 
team of Superior on the grounds of 
the latter team. 

While the West Duluth team will 
go into the game outweigh<;d at least 
six pounds to the man, the> expect to 
make the Superior team iiustle to beat 
them. 

The Tigers are considered one of the 
fastest teams in the city and they 
have won all tlielr games played so far 
this year. They are light but fast 
and this year are stronger than last 
when they were admitted to be about 
the best in amateur football at tlie 
Head of the Lakes; 

The Tigers have a number of games 
with outside teams^and tliey expect 
before the season i& over to furnish 
some brisk Sundav *nterta nment for 
Duluthians who are enthusiastic over 
the game. 

SETTLE ii OF 
LONGSTANDING 

Firemen From Headquarters 

Race on West First 

Street 

A foot race that was nearly a foot 
race took place this morning on "West 
First street. 

Tlie principals were F. K. Baker, a 
member of tlie salvage corps at fire 
headquarters, and F. N. Swanson, a 
truckman emploi'ed at the samo fire 
hall. 

It was all over a bet. Each man la- 
bored under the impression that he 
liad it over the other fellow in any 
branch of sports, and many were the 
heroic feats tiiat eacli liiid accom- 
plished, according to fireside stories 
told while the October wind howlea 
around the building. 

At last Baker confided to one of the 
men tliat he was not the fr.stest thing 
in the world when it came i.o foot rac- 
i n **" 

^his was just tlie sport that Swan- 
son claimed he was all to tlie good on. 
The whisper grew, and soon it came to 
Swanson that Baker could not run. 

At once Mr. Baker receixed a chal- 
lenge to run a race of not over a block. 
Capt. Walsh was selected as stake- 
holder and referee, and also to set the 
time of the big event. 

The stakes amounted to $3 and the 
lime was set for 10:30 this morning. 

Needless to say, all the firemen were 
on hand. Some went wilhoui their 
lunch so that they might witness the 
race. 

At a given word they both started, 
and from their positions in front of 
the fire hall the firemen co.ild not tell 
whether the men were running or 
walking. They came up to the finish. 
Baker leading by about fifteen feet. 
The time was sometliing over seven- 
teen seconds. Just how much over that 
it was is not known. The other firemen 
Slick up for their comrades and refuse 
to say. 

Swanson bought a box of cigars di- 
rectly after the race. 



Nicaraguan President Says 

They Hold Four Cities in 

the Republic. 

New York, Oct. 15. — President Zelaya 
of Nicaragua has cabled the Associated 
Press concerning the extent of the 
revolution in that republic as fol- 
lows: 

"Managua, Nicaragua, Oct. 15, 1909. — 
Gen. Estrada, governor of the depart- 
ment of Zelaya, revolted, proclaiming 
himself president. The revolutionists 
have In their possession Bluefields, 
Kama, Cape Gracias and San Juan del 
Norte. "ZELAYA." 

The places mentioned by President 
Zelaya as having been captured by the 
revolutionists are seaports on the 
coast of the Carribean sea, with the 
exception of Rama, which is an inland 
town about five miles from Bluefields. 

President Zelaya is gathering the 
government forces for an attack on the 
revolutionists at Rama and San Juan 
del Norte. 



DOESN'T LIKE FARM WORK. 



charges preferred by his wife, nor has 
he engaged counsel to defend the ac- 
tion. 

DIRECTORS WILL 
HOLD MEETING 

The Commercial Club Officers 

Will Hear Committee 

Reports. 

A meeting of the board of directors 
of the Commercial club will be held 
this evening and sevei-al committee 
reports will be received. 

A meeting of the legislative and cost 
of living committee was held this noon. 
At this time the members of the com- 
mittee are not ready to take any 
definite action. The meeting today was 
devoted to a general discussion of the 
matters that the members have before 
them. 

Yesterday afternoon a meeting of the 
open market committee was held. This 
meeting, also, was simply devoted to 
a general discussion of the work that 
the committee has before it. 

RETURNS WITH 

HIS CHARGE 



manded by Charles Fi^'^e/*- ^^V'Vhi 
lican and Union Labor "on^'^ee for th» 
pame office, was completed. Heney »• 
luajority is re duced to 24. 

AUTO OWNERS 
AFTER LICENSES 



Auto owners and drivers got buajr 
at the city hall this morning, follow- 
ing the announcement yesterday tnat 
the police will look up those who have 
failed to take out licenses to operate 
machines. Several were waiting ai 
the door this morning before the clerKB- 
arrived at 8 o'clock to open up, ana 
they continued to come one by one- 
until noon. 

ASKS DANES TO LET 

COOK'S RE( ORDS PASS. 

Washington, Oct. 15.— The University 
of Coponnagen was lociay re<iu€sted by 
the National Geographic society to re- 
nounce its first claim to an examina- 
tion of Dr. Coojts observations made- 
during his search for the North Pole. 



BANKERS VS. 

THE BROKERS 



Wife of Rich AVheat Rancher Com- 
plains in Divorce Suit. 

Spokane, Wash., Oct. 15.— Mrs. Maries 1 

Mann, wife jt Jolin Lester Mann, a 

bonanza wheat rancher in Spokane 

county, shows in her petition for di- 
vorce, filed in tlie superior court here, 
that the routine of lier four years of 
married life left no time for visiting 
relatives or neighbors, to say notliing 
of bridge whist and music. Stripped 
of their legal verbiage, the allegations 
set forth in the complaint present tlie 
appended scliedule of duties: 

Rise at 4 o'clock a. m. 

Exercise with a cross-cut saw on a 
pile of log.«. 

Get breakfast for a thrashing crew 
of thirty men, each possessed of a 
healthy appetite. 

After breakfast: 

Plant potatoes and other chores. 

Clean ihe barn and chop Avood for 
the cook stov?. 

Load several wagons with sacked 
grain to take to market. 

Cook dinner for thirty thrashermen, 
with appetites as mentioned. 

Afternoon recreation: 

Butcher nogs and make sau.'jage. 

Chores and wood chopping, also 
milking a dozen cows. 

Prepare supper for the same crew 
of hungry harvesters and clean the 
house. 

Evening at home. 

Darn seeks, make bread and do other 
work till 10 o'clock p. m.; bed on a pal- 
let of straw on the floor of the cook 
house. 

The complainant closes with the 
declaration that Mrs. Mann was liter- 
ally forced by her husband to perforin 
the tasks mentioned, alleging also that 
when she was too sick to work he re- 
fused to permit her to go to her 
mother's home. 

Mann declines to talk about the 



Chief Troyer Brings Back 

Man Wanted for 

Larceny. 

Chief of Police Troyer returned to-" 
day from Charleston, 111., with Harvey 
V. Zimmerman in his custody. The 
young man was arrested in tlie Illi- 
nois city on a warrant charging him 
with the theft of $350 from the Alger- 
Smith Lumber company, in whose em- 
ploy he was. 

While returning with the chief, 
voung Zimmerman is said to have ad- 
mitted the theft of $176 of tlie amount 
charged in the warrant, and to liave 
stated that he was very foolish to com- 
mit such an act. 

Zimmerman comes from Reading, Pa., 
where his family is highly respected 

HEARING ON 
WOODLAND SEWER 



COME TO THE 

POLISH 
BAZAAR 



Cor. 4th Ave. E. and 4th St. 

The finest selection of games 
and hundreds of dollars worth 
of Fancy Work. 

The list of good times an- 
swer for everybod3^ 

Oyster Supper Friday. 

will continue 



The Bazaar 
until Oct. 24th 



At the meeting of the board of pub- 
lic works this niorning the first public 
hearing on the condemnation proceed- 
ings for the construction of the Wood- 
land sewer, was held. Property owners 
interested in the construction of the 
proposed sewer were heard on the mat- 
ter. The Woodland people have been 
working for tiiis sewer for years. 

HENEY'S NOMINATION 

STANDS ON RECOUNT. 



San Francisco. Cal., Oct. 15. — Francis 
J. Heney was sustained yesterday as the 
cruioidate of the Democratic party for 
district attorney at the coming munic- 
ipal election, when the recount de- 



Stewart Heaters 

Will Save Fuel 

They have made good 
right here in Duluth, 

Don't buy a No-Name 
heater — one that the maker 
is ashamed of, when you can 
buy a 

STEWART FOR $25.00. 
TERMS, $1.00 PER WEEK 




Gately's Guarantee n\ 

FIRST— That the inaterial and 
workmanship in every one of our gar- 
ments is first class in all respects. 

SECOND— That the price is as low 
as in any store in the country, and 
lower than the vast majority of them. 



If It Comes From 
Gately's It's Good ! 



II 



Eventrul Giidiron Contest Is 

Scheduled for Nov. 

6. 

The bankers and brokers will meet 
on the field of battle Saturday, Nov. G. 
All details of the big football cl.ish 
between the two financial factions o< 
the city have been arranged, and now | 
n('i)iing sti.nds between the settlement 
of the long-standing feud. 

Quietly both of the teams have been 
practicing. By stealth, when the 
sluules of evening have descended, the 
brokers liave forgotten tie fluctua- 
tions of the market for the moment, 
and have torn through imjiginary op- 
ponents. The members of the banliers' 
team have not in the least neglected 
llitir practice. 

"Cy" Forgette, yallant athlete, will 
lead the forces of the brokers. The 
game promises to be one in which 
much pent-up enthusiasm will be let 
loose. 



PRACTICE FOR 
CRUCIAL GAME 

Detroit Hopes for ''Donovan 

Weather" for Final 

Contest. 

Detroit, Mich., Oct. 15. — This was a 

day of rest for the two contesting 

teams in the world's championship 

series, but both teams spent the day 

in preparing for the crucial game of 
tomorrow, which will decide the base- 
ball championship of the world. Both 
teams had a hard session of practice at 
Bennett park. 

The injured list of the Detroit team 
— the result of the terrific ninth in- 
ing of yesterday's game — reported im- 
provement all around today. 
• The Detroit supporters are becom- 
ing more confident every minute, as 
the weather forecaster has predicted 
"Donovan weather." , This means that 
the thermometer is rising and will be 
around the 50 deg. mark at the lowest 
for tomorrow's glarne. Hill Donovan 
cannot pitch in cold weather, but if It 
warms up enough he will be the man 
to start the big game. 

If it is still cold tomorrow, George 



6dtcly'$ editorial 



=^ 



w 



E IMAGINE that pretty 
nearly everybody knows 
that we sell J.Ien's and 
Ladies' Clo thing on 
credit, on the "$1.00 a week" or 
"easy payment plan." 

But we also know that there arc a 
whole lot of people who think that 
this credit plan is intejidcd for some 
one else— that they themselves, for 
some reason or other — cannot claim 
its advantages. 

That is not so! 

Our credit plan is open to every 
one. 

It is open to you, Mr. Bank Clerk, 
and you will be surprised to see how 
satisfactory our system is, and how 
free from embarrassment. 

It is open to you, Mr. Salesman and 
Miss Saleslady, no matter if you do 
work for our competitor, the big de- 
partment store. You save money by 
trading with us, and you know it! 

It is open to you, Mr. Railroad 
Man. Well make the payments 
monthly instead of weekly, if you 
wish. 

It is open to you. ]Mr. Miner — pay 
us twice a month, if that's the way 
your pay comes in. 

It is open to you, Mr. Laboring 
Man — your hard hands look good to 
us, for they show honesty of purpose. 

It is open to you. Ladies, married 
and single, and our salesladies will be 
glad to tell you about it. 

It is open to YOU, Reader — give 
it a trial. 



^^ 



MEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Ow@ir@©at 



An elegant assortment in the very latest stylee, fabrics 
and shades. I»iice $8.00-$32.50. 



We boast of having as fine and well selected a 
line of coats as was ever shown under one roof 
at the Head of the Lakes. Special attention is drawn to our 
"Presto" with the convertible collar. Price $10.00-$30.00. 



©©ini^i' FuraiilliiSm 



1 A new and fresh stock of most 
_ ' carefuly selected furnishing ar- 
ticles at prices that defy competition. Our winter underwear will 
be sure to please you. 

In our up-to-date revolving Hat cases you will find a 
splendid assortment of both domestic and Imported hats, 
in styles that are up-to-the-minute. Just opened up a shipment 
from London of "Eattersby's" that are simply stunners. 



Vim 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 



lyoili 



©©ails 



We pride ourselves on having the largest assortment 
of tailored suits in the city. One hundred and 
twenty-seven models to select from. Special attention is drawn 
to our big line "They si>eak for tlieniselves"" — at $22.50. 

Our buyer has simply outdone himself in his selec- 
tion of coats. Every number in our large stock seems 
to be a winner. Not a stale one in the lot. You will get value 
received by looking over our coats before buying elsewhere. 
Prices $9.00-$85.00. 



Mk 



A magnificent display of Jerseys. Taffetas, Moirees, 
Lace and Lingerie Waists, in all colors and shades. 
Prices $1.25-$15.00. 



irei 



strictly tailored in gored, pleated, Moyenage and 
Medieval effects. Exceptional values at $3.00-$18.00. 



i A feast for the eye is our di.splay of dresses in 
' Prunellas, Broadcloths, Soliel Cloths and Serges. 
Price $J2.50-$50.00. 



F@^B©©aits 



n 



A large and well-balanced stock, ranging from 
the durable but inexpensive sateen article at 

$1.00 to the best taffeta goods at $5.00-$12.50. Our "Eppo" elastic 

waist band is a special feature. 

A grand array of the latest creations from the 
most wide-awake manufacturers, at $2-$15.00. 



Fyir^ 



I 



Buy the Gately Way 

--Pay Us as You get 

Paid-Weeidy or 

Monthly. 



^ 



If you arc in doubt what furs to buy and wish to .''ee a 
large assortment of everything that the fur market brings 

out, you should, by all means, call on us. Fur Sets from $3.50- 

$160.00. 

SHOE DEPARTMENT 

Men's and Women's Shoes, made in the largest shoe factory 
in United States. Every pair guaranteed. Our $3.50 shoe cannot 
be excelled. 

m^ USE YOUR CREDIT "^ 

{It's not a favor we offer, it's your privilege.) 




6 £. SUPERIOR ST. 

H. A. NELSON, Manaser. 



J 






Mr 



c 



^H^^v^a 



M 



I' 



ttr -inirTiaM 






if 



f* 



* ^ 



/-) 



■ * ^m ^m J*^ 



.t^^^m ' 



« rr 



m^ 



tar nrr-r* i-» -Jiw mti,; 



-I " I J 



■CM«pi 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: (.FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 




r rj-«« b. 






-»- 




Ouu/TM.MlMM' 



Another of those Real 

Value Giving Sales 
Tomorrow! 



Saturday Specials 

Solid Gold 



Sale! 




$1.00 CHIIJVS KINGS— 



69c 




S2.00 MISSFS* RINGS 



$1.39 

KS" SET 1 

$1.89 

FS* SFT 1 

$2.39 

lES" SFT 1 

$2.89 



SS.OO LAI>IFS' SET RING 



$1.00 I..\I>IFS* SFT RIX« 



$5.00 LADIES' SFT KIXGS 



$6.00 LADIES' SFT KIXGS— 



$3.49 

S7.00 I.ADIFS' SF:T RINGS — 

$4.39 

Saturday Only. 




$2 ladies' New Kid Gloves $1.00 

Fine $2.00 N«.\v Glace Mousquetaire 
Kid Oloves. black and colors, all .sizes, 
for $1 a pair. 
Sale is for Sat- 
urday only. 




CtOVL SHC-^ 



•26 West Siipt'i-ior Street. 



-»^ 



WHY NOT 

Keel* warm in one of my 

SUITS OR 
OVERCOATS 

When jou can buy them oi 
Mucb eauy terms of — 

$1 a Week 

I WILL TKIST YOl. 



EDWARDS, 

20 V.Vkni Superior Street. 

II'STAIHS. 

Over Uixon & Lowry 





< 








1 ~^' ■ "'" 











Stewart Heaters 

Will Save Fuel 

They have made good 
right here in Duluth. 

Don't buy a No-Name 
heater — one that the maker 
is ashamed of, when you can 
buy a 

STEWART FOR $25.00. 
TERMS, $1.00 PER WEEK 





J. J. Moran, 405 Central 



BK.4XCH 
Ave. 



OFFICES: 
A. Jen«en, 



S?M North 57th Ave. We»t. 



Park Hill 
the county 



ceme4^*4>^at tlie expense 



SlKnin A 

The Sigma Alph 
Presbyterian Sund 
tain at .supper tlT 

church. 




tub. 

Of the First 
ool will *»nter- 
ening at the 



NEW COURT 
ISJEEDED 

Branch of Moiiicipai Court Is 

Wanted in West 

Duluth. 



Justice Flack Is Busy Daily 

With Minor Police 

Cases. 



That a brancli of the municipal court 
will be a necessity at West Duluth 
next year is the belief of Lieut. Charles 
Wilcox of the West Duluth police de- 
partment and many others who are in 
touch with the .'situation. 

The netd of the branch at West Du- 
luth will become more and more evi- 
dont. it is said, when work starts next 
spring on the new steel plant at New 
Duluth. The large influx of labor to 
tlie western part of the city will mean 
a larger police force, it is claimed and 
better facilities for dealing with of- 
fenilors. 

Tlie West Duluth justice court has 
been growing in Importance at West 
Duluth during the past lew years and 
now has manv civil and otlier actions 
to dispose of dally. Lieut. Wilcox is 
of the oiiinion that if tlie municipal 
court braneh is not established some 
time next year, that there will be at 
least be needed another police officer 
to look after court matters alone. 

There is almost enough business in 
the West Duluth justice court now 
to keep a police officer busy most of 
tl'.e time, serving subpoenaes. return- 
ing warrants, attending trials, etc. 
Some of the cases, of course, are of a 
trivial nature, but they often require 
the same attention as more important 
ones. 



tained at a card party last evening. 
Prizes were won by Mrs. J. O'Brien. 
Frank Pokorney and Kiley Baker. 
Light refreshments were served during 
tlie evening. Those present were: Mr. 
and Mrs. Tutse Sfintaire, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Dunleavey. Mr. and Mrs. .Tohn 
Keller. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kauppi. 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pokorney. Mr. and 
Mrs. llilev Baker. Mr, and Mrs. Thomas 
.Sonne tt, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. O'Brien. 
■ 

Matt Kvnell Funeral. 

Funeral services for Matt Kynell. 56 
years old. of 5514 Nicollet street, who 
died late yesterday, will be held to- 
morrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from 
the Swedish-Finnish church, Flfty-tiilrd 
avenue west and Wadena street. Burial 
will be at Oneoia cemetery. Mr. Kynell 
lived in West Duluth twenty years. 
He leaves a widow and four children. 
The members of the Modern Samaritan 
lodge, of which he was a member, will 
attend the funeral in a body. 



Tigers Entertain Friends. 

The Irving Tigers entertained a large 
crowd last evening at their dancing 
partv in Wades hall. It is estimated 
that there were over 140 couples pres- 
ent. Next Thursday evening the .sec- 
ond of the series of weekly dances to 
be given by the West Duluth Dancing 
club will be held. 



Suit for bl^orc*. 

Augusta King ti^.v'^ suit in district 
court this mornincf fpr- divorce from 
her husband. CareVV K,ing- Mrs. King 
Is 37 years old and' Jiet husband is 42. 
They were marrifed at Boone, Iowa. 
March 19, 1889, and ;She claims her 
husband deserted h^vjp October, 1892. 
There is one child. Florence, aged 19 
years. 

Sues on Lifmber Bill. 

Henry Fugers flleil.",suit in district 
court "this mornlffg, against Maria 
Monacelll Louis Pammala and the 
Chiaholm Improvement company to 
recover |55.57 he claims to be the bal- 
ance due on a bill of lumber furnished 
Pammala to construct a house for Mrs. 
Monaccelli on a lot at Chisholm owned 
by the Improvement eompany. He asks 
that he be given Juagmen'. for the 
amount sued for and that it be de- 
clared a lien on the property. 
■ - 
New Land Connpaiiy. 

Articles of" incorporation .>f the Steel j 
Plant Land company were filed with j 
the register of deeds this morning The i 
incorporators, dire^rp aid offioers 
are: T. W. Wahl, 1)resident; William P. 
Harrison, vice president, £tnd A. G. 
Messer, secretary and treasurer. The 
company is capitalized at >50,000, di- 
vided into 500 shares of th.j par value 
of $100 each. 



WE'RE GOING TO BE BUSY TDMORROW l 

The buying of heavy warm apparel is in order, 
no use putting off— no use dodging the issue. 
Jack Frost has issued his first proclamation. 





OML 



Serve Supper. 

The ladies of St. James' Catholic 
church served supper to about 750 peo- 
ple last evening at Gilley's hall. The 
attendance was large. Eight large 
tables were occupied most of the time 
from 5 to 10 o'clock last evening. 



is visit- 



6113 
of a 



LOOKIN(i FOR HUSBAND. 



IHiehisan 



Woman Believes Her 
Spouse Has Married Again. 

A woman giving her name as Mrs. 
George McDonald and her residence at 
Potts Headquarters. Mich., is in West 
Duluth looking for her husband. She 
.says that he deserted her a short time 
agcr in Michigan and she is under the 
impression that he has come to West 
Duluth. , . „- . 

Mrs. McDonald has friends in West 
Duluth. with whom she is staying for 
a lew davs. If she does not succeed In 
her search f>r her missing husband 
within the next few days, she says 
that she will go to Albert Lea, Minn. 
Mrs McDonald says she believes that 
her husband is married again and that 
he has changed his name. 



MEET 



IN DILUTH. 
~~ Will 



West Duluth Briefs. 

Peter Peterson of Zim, Minn, 
ing in West Duluth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gust Nelson of 
Nashwauk street are the parents 
babv bov. born vesterday. 

Gltchi'Gammi lodge. No. 123, Knights 
of Pythias, met last evening and in- 
itiated several candidates. 

Mrs. Joseoh Tiiomas of 318 Soutli 
I' iftv-seveniii avenue west is back 
from a visit in Southern Wisconsin. 

(jeorge C. .Maine of Minneapolis was 
in West Dulutli yesterday afternoon en 
business. 

Miss Josephine McBrlde is ill at her 
home. 305 North Central avenue. 

Mrs. W. A. Stovall left today for the 
Twin Cities, wnere she will make a 
short visit. 

Fire broke out late yesterday after- 
noon in the transformer room of tlie 
American Carbolite works. The blaze 
was extinguislu'd before the fire de- 
lartment arrived at the plant. 

VV. H. Richter of North Central ave- 
nue left today for Hibbing, where he 
will attend tlie funeral of James 
Ermatinger, his fatiier-in-law. 

John Connelly expects to leav«» next 
week for Chicago. He was given a 
farewell partv Wednesday evening by 
the members of Old Hickory camp. M. 
W. A., of which he is a member. 

The young men of the Christian En- 
deavor Society of Westminster 
church will give an entertainment and 
social this evening at the church. It 
will be featured by a play. ".Modern 
Justice." „ _ ^ 

The quarterly rally of tlie Baptist 
Young I'eoples' I'lilon of the West Du- 
luth Baptist church will be beld this 
evening. Delegates from all of the 
Baptist churches at tlie Head of the 
Lakes will be in attendance. A feature 
of the evening will be an address to 
ti-e young peonle bv Dr. J. S. Kirtle.v. 

Watch repJTiring, Hurst. W. Duluth. 




Under- 
wear & 

Hosiery 

We are no-.v 

fully prepared 

to meet your 

every need in any 

weight. We carry 

the Forest Mills 

brand and call 
special attention 

to the stiperior 

quality of these 

American - made 

garments. 



George A. Perham of Eveleth is at 
the St. Louis. 

Mrs. C. Hellly of Cloquet Is at the 
St. Louis. 

Mrs. W. F. Young of Coleraine is at 
the St. Louis. 

W. B. Shank of Biwablk is at the 
St. Louis. 

COPPER STOCKS 
HAVE ADVANCE 

Shares Active ;and Stronger 
in Boston-rUeal Issues 

km. 



Copp*r stocks had 
the Boston market 
opened at $59.50. 
rallied to $60.25 
bid and $59.50 a 
opened at $81.12i,2i 
and closed at $82 
asl^ed 



a good advan'^e in 

toglay. North Butte 

dttitined to $59.25. 

closed at $59.25 

d. Amalgamated 



ivdinced 



'"?• 



bid 



to $82.12% 
and $82.25 



G-reene-Cananea 



kl^Vn 



ced from $10.50 



Catholic Order of Foresters 
Entertain State Oficers. 

1*. H. Martin and J. Bellmeur have 
returned from a meeting of the state 
court of the Catholic Order of Forest- 
ers, held in St. Paul last Tuesday. The 
next meeting of the court will be held 
in Duluth in November. 

On the occasion of the visjt of the 
state officers here, a large class of 
memhcrs will be Initiated into the or- 
der. The several courts of the order 
in this city have been at work for 
some time in getting up the class. 
State Auditor and Organizer Loskiel 
has been here for some weeks assist- 
ing in tlie work. He lias been very suc- 
cessful and it is expected that the larg- 
est class ever organized will be initiated. 
St. James court, at its last meeting had 
about twenty applications for member- 
ship. The officers of the state court 
are as follows: State chief ranger, f. 
H. Martin, Duluth; vice state chief 
ransrer. .V. J. Eckstein, New Ulm; state 
secietarv, G. W. Sienger. St. Paul; 
state treasurer. H. Von Der Weyer, 
St. Paul; state trustees, J. Bellmeur. 
Duluth; J. Mesenbourg. St. Paul; J. 
Grutsch. St. Cloud; J. A. TIscher. De- 
lano; J. Scliutta. Minneapolis; state 
spiritual director. Rev. D. W. Lynch. 
West Duluth. The state court officers 
will assist at the initiation ceremonies 
to he held here next month. 



FOOT BALL! 

ST. P\IL >iECHANIC ARTS 
HIGH SCHOOL, '• 

V.S. 

Dl LI TH CENTRAL HIOH SCHOOL. 

Tlie big «m"e of tlie «en«on, Uulutb 

4tiiletio Park, Saturdny Afternoon, Oct. 

i«, 3 p. lu. General admlswion, 50 eeuts. 



to $10.62 '■^ and clo.sed at $10.50 and 
$10.75 asked. Butte «'oalition advanced 
from $24.25 to $25 and closed at $24.75 
bid and $25.50 asked. Giroux opened 
at $8.75 and closed at $8.7E bid and $9 
asked. Superior & Pittsburg opened 
at $15,371/2. declined to $15.25 and 
closed at $15 bid and $15.50 asked. 
Anaconda opened at $48. declined to 
$47.25 and closed at -$47.75 bid. Calu- 
met & Arizona sold at $99.75 and $100, 
and closed at $98 bid and $100 asked. 

.Sales on tlie Duluth exchange were 
3,100 shares. Part ixaid Alex Scott sold 
at $4,871^. Cactus at $3.62 V2, Copper 
Queen of Idaho at 89 cents. St, Mary's 
at 29 and 36, cents, part paid Cordova 
at $1.55. full paid Cordova at $3.62 '4. 
Greene-tJananea at $10.25. Shattuck at 
$22.25 and $21.87 V^. Carm.in at $1.25. 
Red Warrior at $2.75. B.u.te &. Supe- 
rior at $2.25. Denn at $4.50. Mowitza 
at $1 and Elenita at $.72'>. 

Following are the closing prices on 
the Duluth exchange; 



Gloves 

All that's wanted 
in the best makes 
of kid, mocha or 
pique, up from $1 
As well as Kay- 
Ber's s i 1 k-lined 
cash m ere and 
knitted wool, in 
black and colors, 
at 50c, 35r and 



Splendid Values Will be Found in 

Fine Tailored Hats ! 



r 



The smartest styles in the latest models 
of the season. Values you won't be able to 
duplicate anywhere 
$25.00 and $35.00. 



else at $15.00, $19.56, 




Nobby Stylish Coats 

The latest Skirt models and the newest 
Waists. 

Our Beautiful 
Millinery 

Is the talk of the town. We feature tomor- 
row, besides the splendid values we are sell- 
ing at $5.00, $6.50, $8.50 and $10.00, 

a table full of regular $5.00 Hats, which we 
will sell for 



$3.50 



Dress 
Goods 

Two Leaders. 

Storm Serges, Ba- 
tistes and Fancies 
— usually sold at 
59c — ^lere 

50c 

Prunellas, French 
Serges, Baya- 
deres. Satin clotha 
and Novelties — 
greatest value 
shown, at 

$1.00 
Silks 

Tussah silk has 
a rough finish, 
like rajah, in all 
tl»e newest shades 

50c 

Cash- 

miere de 

Sole 

In the latest line 

of colorings. 27 

inches wide, per 
yard 

$1.00 



; — t-gi f 1 :zi^ i=L. 




DULUTH, 
Superior St and First Ave. West. 



SUPERIOR, 
Corner Tower and Broadway. 



Knitted 
Mufflers 

Any color, 
black and 
white. 100 
dozen, at 

50o 






->-*" 



■»^ 



Verdict of $300. 

The jury in tiie p.^rsonal injury case 
of Per Peterson against Marshal John- 
son of Eveleth this afternoon returned 
a verdict of $300 for the plaintiff. 




Liiited Stock!«— 



f Bid. I Aske.!. 



BARGAINS 

In WOOLKV KK.M.V.WTS, 
.\|M> L.VDIFS' SKIKT.S 
of all kinds. For sale at r^'a^sonahle 
writvs. 

28 WKST FIRST .STREET. 



Entertains at Cards. 



Mr. 

Fiity 



. Arthur Baker 
-first avenue 



of 417 
west 



North 
enter- 



Palace of Sweets 

We manufacture the very best 
Chrcjlates and Bon Bons. We have 
our own factory and guarantee sat- 
isfaction. Our candies are fresh 
every day. 

Fancy boxes of best candy put 
up to order. 

Bitter Sweets and Caramels that 
are delicious. 

Hot Drinks Served. 

WILLIAM BRANTZ. Pnw. 



PUT 



STYLE 

AND 

CHARACTER 

in your garments. 

Not merely some late fad or idea, 
but one that is applied to your fig- 
uie. size and proportion. A suit may 
fit you. yet be far from suitable for 
your figure. 

It Is time or order your F'all or 
Winter Suit. The cold weather is 
upon us and I am sure that your 
summer suit will not be warm 
enough for you. 

I have a large line of beautiful 
patterns to choose from. It will pay 
you to look them over. 

J. H. ERICKSON 

FIRST-rL.4S.«i T.ill.OR. 
307 Central .%venue. 



Friutluij; uuil Boukblntlins. 

Thwing-Stewart Co. 'Phones Hi. 
■ 
Dr. .\. K. Walker Ham Moved 

To 2103 East First street. Both "phones. 
Duluth 'phone now 235-M. 
. ■ 

Now Iw the Time to lH"ve 

Your furniture reupholstered. Camer- 
on does the work right. Both phones. 
m 
Send It Over 
To the Service Engraving Co., or call 
up 4452-D. 1017 Tower Ave., Superior. 

Mfm. a. K. Clark Die». 

Mrs A. K. Clark, 24 years old. wife 
of Corporal A. K. C'.ark. died last 
night at her home, 1012 West First 
street. She is survived by her hu.sband 
and an infant daughter, born shortly 
before her death. She was formerly 
Miss .\gnes Campbell, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles D. Campbell of ^2 
Tfenth avenue west. 



H. 'W. Fisher Return*. 

H. W. Fi.sher. the Duluth mining 
man who accidentally shot his hand 
off while hunting at Mouse River. N. D., 
a week ago last Wednesday, returned 
home vesterday. While weak from the 
shock of the accident and succeeding 
operation. Mr. Fisher is rapidly recov- 
ering. Many friends called at the home 
yesterday. 



American Saginaw ...; 

Butte Coalition 

Butte-AIex Scott, pt. pd. 

do full paid 

Butte-Ballaklava 

Calumet & Arizona 

Cactus Development .. 

Copper yueen 

Cordova part paid 

do full paid 

Denn-.\rizona 

Giroux Consolidated . . 

Greene Cananea 

Keweenaw 

Lake Sup. & Sonora.,.. 

Live Oak Dev 

North Butte 

Ojibway • . . • 

Savanna, part paid..... 
Savanna, full paid,,.... 

.Shattuck Arizona 

Superior & Pittsbu^-g.. 

Walnut Grove 

Warren Developmeiii- .. 

VnliMted Mtoekn— 
.Arizona & Michigan? 
Black Mountain 
Butte & Superior 
Calumet & Montana 
Calumet & Corbin 
Calumet & Sonora 
Carman Consolida 

Chief Consolidated 

Cliff -.. .. 

Duluth & Sonora 

Elenita D>?velopment » . 
Keating Gold ... 4} IL >. 
L. Superior & Arlzijma. 

Mowitza i' • ' 

National if 4.. 

Red Warrior .H ;'; 

Rawhide Royal......... 

San Antonio ^i . . 

St. Mary .U. . 

Superior & Globe 

Tuolumne 

Wolverine & Arizona . . 
Zenith Lead & Zinc . . . 

Sierra 

Butte & Ely 



'24\ 
4V2 

944 
l')0 

3V4 
S8c 
1 9-16 

4^8 

9 

10 Vi 
2% 

59 

8 
1% 

21% 
15 V4 

1 

2% 



f n? . . . I 
,T. ...f 2 

ia ... 

t«4>4 



80c 
60c 
.^-16 

1% 
20c 
11 

IV4 
IV4 



The MpaldluK Cafes. 

Modern in every detail. Orchestra 
Sunday. Wednesday and Saturday even- 
ings of each week during the dinner 
liour. 



New tirnnituid Pavins. 

The granitoid paving, which Is being 
laid on Twenty-fifth avenue east, be- 
tween First and Sixth street.s. Is ex- 
pected to be finislied this afternoon 
This is the fir.si time this paving 
been laid in the citj. 



has 



''Makiui£ Mont of 

Rabbi Lcfkowltz of 
inanuel will conduct the 
ices there tnls evening, 
will be "Making the Most 



I Ate." . . 
Temple Em- 
regular serv- 
His subject 
of Life." 



Floater .\ot Identllled. 

The Jioater picked up In the Sixth 
avenue slip Wednesday morning has 
not been Identified. Several persons 
have looked at the bodv. but did not 
know it. He will be burled tomorrow 



WEST DULUTH 6R0GERY CO., 

"THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY." 
."iSOa RaniMey Street. Zenith 'phone, 3244. 

Twenty pounds granulated sugar for $1.00 will be given Saturday with 
a cash purchase of groceries amounting to |2.00 or over. On this item 
alone you will save 30 cents. In less quantities than ?1.00. sugar will be 
sold at tlie regular price. 

Some of <Our Tomorrow Prices 

One crate of Colorado Alberta Peaohea, only fl.OO 

Concord t;n»pe», per banket pic 

8 pound.H of Sweet Potatoes » • 2«»« 

7 hoxesi of Sardlnex, In oil -•^« 

FrcMh EggM, per doien fj^' 

3 ponndM of RalMluM -•^<' 

» poiindH of Pruuew -•*•' 

Cranberrie*, per quart i'**' 

We'll be glad to quote you prices on quantities and get your trade. 
\IVE SELL. NOKOMIS TEAS AND COFFEES. 



7Vi 
I. 1-16 
3% 
1 
54c 
2% 
9c 

36c 

80c 
4V8 

97c 
1% 
BMi 
1% 



3% 
25^1 

4^; 

9V4 
10 
1001,4 

3^4 
90c 

1% 

4 

4% 

9V4 
10% 

3 
60c 

T% 
59% 

8V4 

2 

3% 
22% 
15% 

IVi 

3 

90c 
80c 
2 5-16 

1% 
25c 
11% 

1% 
1 7-16 

2 

5 ¥2 

8 

IVi 

4V4 

IMi 
58c 

2% 
lie 

8 
40c 
90c 

4^4 

1 

2 

5% 

1% 



VOLNO AMERICA. 

Delineator: Jlmmie Irwin went to his 
mother on his return from Sunday 
scl'.ooi and said: ".\lainnia, ' the teacher 
told a story at -Sunday school today." 

Mother — Oh, no. dear, I think you are 
mistaken. 

Jinimie — No. I'm not; she told a 
story. 

Mother — Well, wliat was it? 

.limrjiie — Siie said that if I told a 
story the bad man would get nie. I've 
tried it twice and he hasn't got me 

yef! 

• • * 

Little Frank had been taken by his 
father to hear the patriotic exercises 
in the town hall and liad been much 
Interested in it all. The singing had 
delighted him, "Columbia, the Gem of 
the Ocean." impressing him particu- 
l&rly. 

The 1 ext day he sat In the kitchen 
watching ills mother make her goose- 
berr\ jam. ^ , 

"Mother," he said suddenly, "your 
jam is made of gooseberries. Isn't it?" 

"Ves, dear," said his mother. 

"Well." said Frank, "I was just 
wondering what Columbia,^ the jam of 
the ocean, is made fr.im." 
« • « 

Elinor was very anxious to bring 
home an Angora cat from Maine last 
summer. Her mother objected, think- 
ing that the care of a cat from Maine 
to Connecticut was entirely too ardu- 
ous a ta.sk, so she tried to "buy off 
Elinor "If vou will say no more 
about the cat," she said. "I will give 
you a dollar to spend :n Boston.' 



FOR SALfC 

Undivided four-tenths interest northeast 
quarter of southeast quarter section 30, 
township 63, range 11, Lake county, Minn. 
This is a part of the famous Section Thirty. 
Inquire 

E:DWARD LrYNCH 

431 MANHATTAN BUILDINC;, DULUTH, MINN. 



T 







PRIEST CALLED 
FOR McCARREN 



State Senator's Condition 

Takes a Turn for the 

Worse- 

New York, Oct. 15. — fUate Senator 
P. H. McCarren's illness took a turn 
for the worse this afternoi>n. He 
made his will and a priest was sum- 
moned to administer the last rites. 

SHOULD REPORT 
AT HEADQUi^RTERS 



"All fire alarms from Park Point 
should now be reported directly to 
headquarters," said Chief Randall this 
afternoon. "We have direct connec- 
tions with the point and it would give 
the Park Point people better service 
if they would report all fires directly 
to headquarters. We keep a man sta- 
tioned on the point,, but In some of the 
recent fires there we have not been 
notified until the blaze was extin- 
guished or the house buinpd down." 

HALL CAINE HAS 

SERIOUS ATTACK. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 13 Cents. 



REMEMBER 
and Alvaro 



TH.\T THE LA DELLA 
are home-made cigars. 



It's never loo late to 
upholster your 
'piiones. Shop, 123 



have Cameron re- 
furniture. Both 
First avenue W. 



FOR .SALE— THOROl'GHBRED COLLIE 
puppie.s. $5 each. 5349 London road. 



Vv'AXTED TO RENT— BARN OR SHED 
for storage purposes. R. -S. Blome com- 
pany. Twenty-fiftli avenue east and 
Slxtii street. Telephone new 1887-Y. 

FOR RENT— COMFORTABLE UNI-^UR- 
nished winter cottage at Thirty-sec- 
ond street. Park Point: gas. city 
water and electric light; hardwood 
lloors. Call old 'phone 14S8-L. 



Elinor loked quite thoughtful for a mo- 
ment, then said: "But mother, how 
mucli loi:ger a cat would last than a 
dollar." 

* « * 

The following conversation was 
overheard between two boys, aged 7 
and 5: 

".Joe why can't chickens talk?" 
"Aw, they don't rave to; when they 
wants anything, they just pull their 
wish bones and they gets their wish." 

* • • 

Little 4-year-old Marian was walk- 
ing one day with her mother when slie 
saw a daciishund for the first time. 
Like all dogs of this class, his body 
was long and his legs very short. 

Marian gazed at him with wide-open 
brown e.ves for a moment, then said 
excitedly: "Oh, mother, mother, look at 
that queer doggy witii legs at each 
corner of him! Was his legs long once, 
and did they get wored down by him 
using them so much?" 

« • • * 

Little .Josephine, aged 4, was intently 
studying the pictures in a book and 
seemed very much interested in a pic- 
ture of Charles Dickens. 

Taking the book to her mother, she 
Inquired who it was. 

"Tliat is Dickens, dear, 
motlier. 

The picture was wonderfully fasci- 
nating to t'ne little girl and 
big sister came from college 
evening she ran and got 
turned to the picture and 



said her 



when her 
in the 
the book, 
said 



see! This is a picture of Mr. 



"No, dear, that 



•I knew 
word." 



It 



HAIRS, MOLES, WARTS REMOVED 
by electricity. Snampooing, mani- 
curing. Full line of hair goods. Miss 
Kelly, over Suftel's. 



BIRTHS. 



London. Oct. 15. — Hall Calne. the au- 
thor, suffered a severe atack of heart 
trouble during last night. His condi- 
tion today is such ^s to cause much 
anxiety. 



NELSON — A son was born to Mr. and 

Alis. U. A. Nelson of 23 West Ninth 

street O^t. 14. 
STEWART — A daughter was born to 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Stewart 

215 West Fifth street. Oct. 13. 
PETERSON — A daughter was born 

Mr. and Mrs. Anton Peterson 

Fifteenth avenue east, Oct. 12. 
THORP — A son was born to Mr. 

Mrs. John Thorp of 607 

nue west. Oct. 10. 
STRt'M — A daughter was born 

and Mrs. Alex Strom of 

Tliird street, Oct. 10. 
JOHNSON — A son was born 

Mrs. Carl Johnson of 

avenue, Sept. 3'). 



of 



Sixtieth 



of 

♦ o 
516 

and 
a ve- 



to Mr. 
4821 West 

to Mr. and 
5507 Grand 



for making the tool and keeping quiet 
about it. Many detectives can recall 
cases of tliis kind that have come to 
light in London. 

One In particular occurred some 
years ago when an escaped convict 
named Williams went to a blacksmith 
in the East end and got him to make a 
lot of drills to be used In safe crack- 
ing. He personally superintended the 
tempering of the steel, but when tlie 
job was nearly completed it leaked out 
and Williams was arrested. In this in- 
stance the blacksmith knew nothing of 
the use to which the tools were to be 
put. Most of the tools used by burg- 
lars are secured In the same way. 

The only regular establishment ever 
discovered wliere they were made was 
in the East end. This was years ago 
and the place was soon pounced upon. 



MOOSE ANI> EN'(;1NI0 TE.ST 
.STRENGTH. 

St John Sun: Though It Is close 
season for hunting the 11:15 express 
was not responsible for breaking the 
laws. About one mile out of McAdam 
a fine cow moose contested its strength 
with the engine, resulting In the noble 
beast's death. 

As it did not fall from the fender 
the train was stopped and the beauti- 
ful but much damaged carcass was 
lifted off the line to be claimed later 
on by the game warden. It is sup- 
posed that the flies drive the animals 
out into the open. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To .S. W. Hill, frame dwelling. 
West Sixth street, between 
Twenty-first and Twenty-sec- 
ond avenues fl.OOO 

To J. H. La Chance, frame 
cottage. Minneapolis avenue 
and Anoka street 500 

To R. H. Hadfleld, remodel store 
building. West Superior 
street, between Twentieth 
and Twenty-first avenues.... 1.000 



"Sister. 
Darn." 

Her sister replied: 
is Mr Dickens." 

"Well," said Josephine. ' 
was some kind of a swear 

• * • 

A little' girl of 3 was having a 
naughty time of it one evening. The 
mother undressed her and put her to 
bed and decided to leave her for a time 
to the gentle administrations of her 
father. He succeeded in quieting hor. 
T.'P mother cam; to Oi3 her Utile g"'. 
good night and upon asking: "Well, 
dearie, have you asked God to forgive 
you?" received the replv: 

"Yes. and 1 asked Him to forgive 

vou. too." 

♦ • • 

Tom was so much surprised at the 
church music on his first Sunday at- 
tendance that he called out: "What is 
that"" I said: "Hush! that's the organ. 
And to my horror, he yelled: '"Oh! do 
let me go and see the monke y." 

WHERE A BURGLAR GETS TOOLS. 

Tit-Bits: Everv little while, said a 
London detective recently, the police 
arrest a man with a .set of burglars 
tools in his possession and one natural- 
ly wonders where they all i ome from. 

It is easy to buy a gun of any de- 
scription, and the most reputable per- 
son would not be ashamed to be seen 
purchasing the most wicked looking 
knife ever made, but who would know 
where to get a jimmy or a device for 
drilling into a safe or any of the many 
tools used bv the perofessional burglar 
In the pursuit of his calliing? 

There probably are places in the 
large cities where these things are 
made and sold to the users, but such 
places are exceedingly scarce. It may 
seem a little strange to learn that most 
of the tools used in burglaries are 
made by mechanics who are looked up- 
on as respectable men in the commun- 
ity. ,. , 

When a burglar wants any particular 
tool made he goes to a mechanic who 
can do the job and pays him perhaps 
five times what It is actually wnth 



It Is estimated tliat in the streets of 
London some $500,000 is every year 
given to beggars. 



"Waking up" to 
the ads. is often the 
era In one's life. 



the Importance of 
beginning of a new 




Interior Work 

In All Its Branches. 

WOOD FINISHING— In all its 

branches. 
DECOK.'VTING — In harmony 

with the architecture. 
FURNITURE — Of consistency. 

Comfortable upholstering. 

DR.^PF^RY — For all purpo.ses. 

RUGS — Made from special de- 
signs. 

Get an estimate from us. 



m t t m ^ 



Cowan & Zimmennan, 

Interior Decorators. 
531 East Superior Street. 



I 




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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



CASES OF INTEREST 



KKGLLATIONS OF SALE OF IN- 
TOXIC.VTING LIQUORS. — A municipal- 
Uy. by its stringent restrictions upon 
\he sale of •near beer," made the ordi- 
nance passed for tbat purpose ob- 
noxious to some of its citizens, one of 
wliom had been convicted of its viola- 
tion, in Campbell vs. City of Thomag- 
ville, t»4 Southwestern Keporttr. 81o. 
Tlie Georgia court of appeals, sustain- 
ing tlie ordinance, remarked tliat tlie 
verv name "near beer" is as sugges- 
tive to the guardian of the police 
power of a ntcessity for close over- 
siglit. regulation, and control as it is 
to the drinking classes of pos- 
sibilities wiiicli tliey may hope 
to fiinl in tlie beverage. A liquor 
that is "near beer," looks like 
beer, smells like beer, tastes some- 
what like beer, capable of cheering, 
though not of inebriating, well de- 
serves the attention of those whose 
dutv it is to protect the health, peace, 
and' good order of tlie community. 

CONSTITUTIONAKITY OF BUILD- 
ING HKGULATIONS.— The act classi- 
fying Hoston into commercial and resi- 
dential sections. and limiting the 
height of buildings in the former to 
125 feet and in the later to frt)m 80 
to li'O feet, was considered in Welch 
vs Swasey. 29 Supreme Court Tteport- 
er, 567. I'laintiff. applying for per- 
mission to erect a building in the resi- 
dential district. claimed that the 
statute unduly and unreasonably in- 
fringed on his constitutional rights as 
to taking ills property without com- 
pensation and as to denial of e<iual 
protection of tlie laws. The highest 
state court upheld the legislation as 
passed in tlie exercise of the police 
power. In passing on tlie questions as 
to the validitv and reasonableness of 
the discrimination or classitication in 
relation to the height of buildings, 
the matter of locality became of ut- 
most importance. The United States su- 
preme court declined to hold tiie limita- 
tion of 80 to 100 feet in the residen- 
tial district a discrimination or classi- 
fication so unroasonalile that it de- 
proved the owner of his property and 
of its profitable use without justin- 
cation. and refused him compensation 
for such alleged invasion of his riglits. 



VICIOT'S rKOl'KNSITY OF BOAR.— 
In Johnston vs. Mack Manufacturing 
Companv, ^4 Southeastern lieporter, 
841, it appeared tliat a iarge boar be- 
longing to defendant had gone upon 
the unfenced premises ot plainiilt. and 
liad endeavored to break through a 
fence inclosing his hogs. Tlie attempts 
of plaintiff to expel the intruder result- 
ed in a conllict, in whicii he was lacer- 
ated and seriously injured by the visit- 
ing swine. There was no law compel- 
ling the conlinenient of hogs, nor was 
there convincing evidence of prior pug- 
r.acitv of the animal. Plaintiff intro- 
duced expert testimony to the ertect 
that boars the age of the one in ques- 
tion become vicious and are likely to 
attack men and animals. Because of 
the introduction of tliis evidence de- 
fendant was granted a new trial, the 
West Virginia supreme court ot ap- 
peals holding that, as the habits and 
propensities of domestic animals were 
rnat:ers of common knowledge to all 
men. there was no reason for expert 
testimonv to prove the general pro- 
pensitv of a hog. especially as this was 
the first recorded case wherein a hog 
had savagely bitten and injured a man 
or d-parted from his usual demeanor 
of meekness and serenity. 

TURNTABLE DOCTRINE UPHELD. 
—Tliat doctrine usually alluded to as 
the •turntable cases^ has of late been 
so often swerved from, that the de- 
cision in Snare & Triest Company vs. 
Friedman. 169 Federal Reporter, 1. as- 
sumes interest because of its adher- 
ence to it. Defendant, an independent 
cont'-actor. had left material, consist- 
ing partlv of heavy iron girders, near 
a street. " One of these beams became 
so niceiv balanced on the other ma- 
terial fnat it could easily be displaced 
and caused to fall. Plaintiff, a 
girl 4»- years old, with several 
panlons, had been skating on the pave- 
ment, vhen she sat at the base ot the 
girdHrs to rest. One of her compan- 
ions.' climbing upon the pile, so struck 
end of the balancing girder that 
crushing plaintiffs foot. The 



court, adopting both objections to the 
law, held that its effect was violative 
of the Constitution, in that it disfran- 
chised voters who through no fault of 
their own, but because the law offered 
them no opportunity, were unable 
register. 



to 



REMOVAL OF CHURCHES BY VES- 
TRY. Since 1807 St. Johns chapel has 

been a place of worship in New >ork. 
but owing to changed conditions in its 
neighborhood, the vestry of Trinity 
church determined to close it and 
transfer the work carried on there to 
another church within the same parish, 
half a mile distant. To prevent this 
removal an injunction was sought. In 
Hurke vs Rector, etc.. of Trinity 
church, 117 New York Supplement, U»o, 
the New York supreme court held that 
as the vestry has the supervision and 
the control, and is the sole manager of 
the temporalities of religious corpora- 
tions, the plaintiffs are required to 
conform to the canons, usages, and dis- 
cipline of the church of which they are 
members. The judicial power is re- 
luctant to interfere in matters of re- 
ligious and ecclesiastical arrangement, 
and will do so only when rights of 
property and civil rights are Involved. 

POWER TO REGULATE ADVERTIS- 
ING;. — New York city passed an ordi- 
nance regulating the use of streets for 
the exhibits of advertising, providing 
that no advertising wagons be allowed 
therein, except ordinary business no- 
tices on wagons not used merely for 
advertising. The power to pass this 
ordinance was questioned in Fifth Ave- 
nue Coach Company vs. City of New 
York, 86 Northeastern Reporter, 824. 
It appeared that the compensation 
which the coach company derived by 
advertising was regulated by the num- 
ber of coaches which it employed. This 
number constantly increased. By the 
advertising display alone was realized 
a gross income of more than 6 per cent 
on the entire capital stock. Slow-mov- 
ing trucks were barred from the 
streets, owing to the congestion at- 
tending the passing of these garish ve- 
hicles. The New York court of appeals 
decided the ordinance within the city's 
power to pass, remarking that every 
rrocession. parade or show upon vehicles 
passing through the public streets 
tends to congestion therein, and to 
some extent interferes with those en- 
gaged in business. If the company 
has the right to so decorate its convey- 
ances, the owner of any wagon would 
have the same right, such a panorama 
or urban art being capable of assum- 
ing the aspect of a congestive menace. 



lutle 
com- 



one 
fell. 



OBSTRUCTING SIDE W A L K S BY 
FliUIT MERCHANTS. — Its sidewalks 
being occupied by shiners of shoes and 
\endor3 of fruit, a city passed an or- 
dinance making it unlawful for any 
person to erect any booth, shed, stand 
or anv other ob.struction upon the side- 
walk "for the sale of mercliandise, or to 
be used for shining shoe.«. By those 
iitwlv-acquired citizens whom this reg- 
ulation affected it was bitterly assailed 
in Chapman vs. City of Lincoln, 121 
Northwestern Reporter, 596. Plaintiffs 
complained that other merchants were 
allowed to use the sidewalks for the 
display of their goods. The Nebraska 
supreme court held the city without 
authority to bind the public whose free 
right to tlie streets and sidewalks 
could not be taken. Because it, per- 
haps Illegally, has seen tit to allow its 
merchants to display upon the walk in 
front of their stores samples of their 
wares, it does not follow that it was 
ever the intention of tlie city to allow 
such merchants to convert the side- 
walk space set apart for the public 
into a source of revenue by sublet- 
ting to obnoxious persons, who use It 
for crying out, engaging their services 
and selling their wares. 



on Mr. Kincaid, 'that is really import- 
ant, and It isn't necessary if you re- 
member the other things I've told you. 
It's pretty easy sometimes to do a 
ching because you see everybody else 
doing it. Always remember that a 
true sportsman in every way is about 
the scarcest thing they make — and the 
finest. So naturally the common run 
of people don^t live up to it. If you — 
not the thinking you, nor even the 
conscience you, but the way-down- 
deep-ln-your-heart you that you can^t 
fool nor trick nor lie to — if that you is 
satisfied, it's all right.' He turned 
and grinned humorously at his small 
companion. 

•' 'I've nothing but a little income and 
an old horse and two dogs and a few 
friends. Bobby. I've lived thirty years 
in that little place there, and a great 
many excellent people call me a good- 
for-nothing old loafer. But I ve learned 
the things I'm telling you now, and 
I'm just conceited and stuck-up enough 
to think I've made a howling success 
of it.' 

" 'I don't think that.' said Bobby, lay- 
ing his cheek against the man's thread- 
bare sleeve. 

" Of course you don't, Bobby,' said 
Mr. Kincaid cheerfully, "and I'll tell 
you why. It's because you and I speak 
the same language, although you're a 
little boy and I'm a big man.' " 

A SUFFRAGE DANCE. 

It is a mistake to think that the suf- 
fragists ignore totally the lighter side 
of life, says the Ladies' Pictorial of 
Londan. A very gay and successful 
private subscription ball in aid of 
wximan suffrage took place at 92 Lan- 
caster gate, by permission of Mrs. 
Hughes, on a recent evening. 

There were an excellent band and 
floor and great numbers of dancing 
men. The rooms and staircases were 
appropriately adorned with purple, 
white and green and with banners and 
pictorial emblems of the suffrage. Lady 
Marjory Blnnie, Lady Harberton. Lady 
Constance Lytton and others contribut- 
ed to the success of the very animated 
dance. 

Among those present were Miss Cliris- 
tabel Pankhurst. who looked very 
charming in a soft white gown, and 
Miss Cobden Sanderson, while among 
the pretty young girls dancing were 
the Misses Beatrice and Nora Cralk 
and Miss Little. 



Il 



Find time, today, for a quick trip to 
the store whcse ad "gets you" — en- 
lists your purse Interest, 



It 

cir- 

cult court ot appeals held that the child | "tempting 
could not, by reason of her age. he — ■ 
charged with contributory ne?r Ugence 
or with being a trespasser, and that de- 
fendant was liable. 

CONTEMPT BY ALLOWING LYNCH- 
ING OF FEDERAL PRISONER.— A 
negro having been convicted of a crime 
which had aroused intense local tee - 
ing and being under sentence ot death, 
appealed to the federal supreme court 
That tribunal allowed the appeal and 
ordered all proceedings *'tayed. 1 he 

community which "'i'^ ^^f^i^f/^^^^^t hv 
prisoner's executh-n on the day set by 
the state c.iurt was so aroused by in- 
flan-matory newspaper reports concern- 
ing the interference by allowance of 
appeal to the supreme court that a 
TOo'b entered the Jail, took forth and 
hanged the prisoner. In United States 
vs Shipp. 29 Supreme Court Reporter, 
637 it appeared that the sheriff in 
charge of the prisoner had not been 
vigilant enough in guarding the Jail 
and that his resistance to the mob had 
been too mild. There was even evi- 
dence to show an understanding Dt- 
tween the officers and the crow-d. li^ 
an ooinion from which three of the jus- 
tices dissented, the United States su- 
preme court held the sherift guilty of 
contempt in failing to give his prisoner 
adequate protection. 

S\LE OF INTOXICANTS TO IN- 
EBRI \TES. — A Kentucky statute for- 
bids giving or furnishing intoxicants 
to inebriates or to any person 
habitually becomes intoxicattd^ 
Adams Express Company vs. Kentuck>, 
29 Supreme Court Reporter, bii, the 
express company was prosecuted tor 
violating that statute by delivering to 
an inebriate liquor which had been 



who 
In 



DENIAL OF EQUAL PROTECTION 
OF CO.WICTS. — Prisoners in Idaho, at- 
tempting an escape, were punishable 
by confinement for the term of their 
original sentence. If a convict were 
serving a one-year sentence, his pun- 
ishment for escape would be one year, 
while a convict serving a twenty- 
year sentence would be punished for 
exactly the same offense by being im- 
lirisoned just twenty times as long. 
The method of determining the pun- 
ishment for one confined for life, at- 
to escape, is not made clear. 
This statute was alleged to deny e(|ual 
protection to all persons charged with 
its violation and to be unreasonable 
and class legislation. To say that 
the long-time convict is more culpable 
for preciselv the sam.e behavior, is 
absurd. The punishment for such es- 
cape would be not upon the act of es- 
caping a prison, but upon tlie act of 
escaping a punishment fixed by the 
judgment of conviction. The statute, 
however, makes the escape from tlie 
state prison the offense, and not the 
escape from the punishment of the 
judgment fixed bv the court upon trial. 
In Ex parte Mallon, 102 Pacific Re- 
porter. 374. the Idaho supreme court 
held this statute unconstitutional. 



NOTICE OF CONFIRMATION OF AS- 
SESSMENT FOR CEMENT SIDE- 
WALKS, EAST OF TWELFTH AVE- 
NUE WEST. „. , 
Office of the Board of Public Works 
City of Dulutli, Minn.. Oct. 15, 1909. 
Notice Is hereby given that the as- 
sessment of Four thousand fifty-one 
(4051) dollars and twenty-nine (29) 
cents made by the Board of Public 
Works upon September 27. A. D., 1909, 
property specially bene- 
construction of cement 
the City of Duluth, Min- 
of Twelfth avenue west. 
Board, upon notice duly 
given, confirmed on October 15, A. D., 
1909, and said assessment has been 
duly entered by the Board of Public 
Works in a book kept by it for that 
purpose. _^ ^, PRESTON, 

President. 

Attest: 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk Board of Public Works. 

RE. H., Oct. 15. 1909. D. 288^ 



909, personally.^eana£ared before me 
Walter F. Dacey. AT. L. Wiseman, C. C. 
Colton. G. F. Roecker and C. Wein- 
steln, to me known to be the persons 
named in and wUo ©jcecuted the fore- 
going Certificate -of Jncorporation, and 
they severally afcldaowledged to me 
that they executed the same as their 
free act and deed^ <- 

• R:<W. 
Notary Public, St. Louis 
nesota. 

' s 



SPROAL. 
County, Mln- 



County, Min- 
Nov. 4. 1915. 
Department of 



(Notarial Seal, SV l^ul 

nesota. ^ 

My Commission Exp^es 

^ 

State of Minnesotag 

State. 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed fOr record in this 
office on the 13th dav of October, A. D. 
1909, at 9 o'clock- A. Jkl., and was duly 
recorded In Book "S-af-'of Incorporations 
on page 68. 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of State. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
— ss. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed In this office for 
record Oct. 14. 1909, at 11:30 A. M. and 
was duly recorded In Book 10 of Misc., 
page 88. 

M. C. PALMER, 

Register of Deeds. 
By THOS. CLARK. 

Deputy, 
Duluth Evening Herald, Oct. 14 and 
1909. 



15.. 



ASSESSMENT 



FOR LOCAL. 
MENT. 



I MPROVB- 



against the 
fited by the 
sidewalks in 
nesota, east 
was by said 



OflTice of the 
BOARD OF PLBWC \% ORKS. 

City of Duluth, Minn., Oct. 12, 1909. 

Notice is liereby given that the 
Board of Public Works of tHe city of 
Duluth has completed its assessment 
for the cost and expense of construct- 
ing plank sidewalks in said city and 
that at ten o'clock A. M., on the 
Twenty-ninth day of October, A. D. 
1909, said Board of Public Works will 
attend at the office of said board In 
the City Hall building for tlie purpose 
of hearing objections theretti; that all 
objections made to said assessment 
must be filed in writing ivith said 
board at least one day prior to the 
time above specified, and that unless 
sufficient cause is shown to the con- 
trary, the said assessment so made as 
aforesaid will be confirmed. 

Notice is hereby further given that 
the following is a copy of said assess- 
ment roll so completed as aforesaid: 

ASSESSMENT ROLL. 

Duluth, Minn.. Oct. 11, 1909. 
The Board of Public Works of the 
City of Duluth doth hereby assess and 
levy upon and against the several lots, 
parts of lots and parcels of land below 
described, the respective sums: of money 
set opposite each lot. part of lot, or 
parcel of land. The assessment is levied 
to defray in full the expen.'ie of con- 
structing plank sidewalks in said city 
in the streets, avenues and alleys 
hereinafter mentioned, according to 
benefits. 

Total 
Amount 
Description. of As- 
Lot. Block, sessm't. 



east half 

Adolph H. Bader 

Adam Schaefer .... 
George W. Norton, 

south 45 feet 

George W. Norton, 

south 45 feet 

HarrlMon*« Brookdale 
DivlMlon, Tenth 
Street. 

Education. 

Education. 

Education. 

Education. 

Education. 

Education. 

Addition. 

Education . 

Thompson 

Thompson 



of 
of 
of 
of 
of 
of 



Board 

Board 

Board 

Board 

Board 

Board 

SpaidinK'a 

Board of 

Lewis J*. 

Lewis J. 

F. C. Smith 

Marius Peterson . . 

John X. Johnson... 

Martin Johnson . . . 

Peter A. Pihlstrom. 

Peter A. Pihlstrom. 

Andrew P. Lund... 

Peter Bernard .... 

Mcrcliantii Park Dl 



5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



ViMiOU, 

Street. 

Peter H, 

Peter 

John 

John 

John 

John 

John 

John 

•John 

John 

John 

John 

John 

John 

Frank 



Thirteeutli 



H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
IL 
H. 
R. 



Name 

so far 

to 

Upper 



and 
In- 



Full reports of anv case can be sup- 
plied by the West Publishing company, 
St. Paul, for 25 cents. 

WAYS OF PICKPOCKETS. 

"Low Grade Dips' Work In Fairs- 
Some of the Tricks. 



As 
their 
Only 
pairs. 



purchased bv liim in Oliio and sent to 
him at his residen.ce in Kentucky. The 
lower court ruKd that tlie transporta- 
tion and delivery of the liciuor did not 
constitute interstate commerce; liquor, 
however obnoxious and hurtful it may 
be in the judgment of many, being a 
recognized article of commerce. 



TENDENCY OF REGISTRATION TO 
■DISFRANCHISE.— The Illinois law 

madii registration a prerequisite to vot- 
ing. There was an opportunity al- 
lowed to register for the August elec- 
tion in April. No person who would 
not be 21 on the day of the election 
following his registration was allowed 
to register, but those persons moving 
Into a precinct subsequent to the regis- 
tration dav were allowed to vote. The 
law was a'ttacked in People vs Strass- 
heim. X8 Northeastern Reporter. 821, on 
the grounds that it was invalid be- 
cause violating the constitutional pro- 
vision that elections shall be free and 
equal, and that it tended to disfran- 
chi.«e electors. Thus a man becoming 
21 between April and August would not 
be entitled to vote. He might be- 
come 21 within a day after the April 
election and possess all tiie qualifica- 
tions of a voter, but the lav/, affording 
him no opportunity to register, de- 
prived him of the right to vote in 
August. Those securing citizenship 
through naturalization between the 
months mentioned would be in a like 
predicament. The Illinois supreme 



a usual thing pickpockets vary 
methods to suit circumstances, 
the lower grade dips work in 
These are the men who operate 
on street cars, elevated station plat- 
forms and similar places where they 
will find crowds of pushing people and 
have opportunity to escape if detected. 

One of the pair shoulders a victim 
roughly wliile the other does the work 
and makes a getaway. Arrests are 
frequent, but convictions rare, because 
the man captured seldom has the loot. 

The higher grade dips also work in 
ouch places. The difference, according 
to the Bohemian, is that they work 
in groups and choose times when pros- 
perous passengers will be in the ma- 
jority. During the fashionable shop- 
ping hours and after the theater at 
night are considered harvest times. , 

Ldst winter three dips worked a fP^F'^'y^ 
clever method in Chicago. Garbing Ine."" s"' 
themselves in evening clothes they 
mingled in fasiiionable crowds in big 
cafes, theater exits and railway 
stations. One of the party was al- 
ways hopelessly drunk and the others, 
apparently acting the part of Samari- 
tans, were hard put trying to keep him 
on his feet. 

With all their care, however, he 
would stumble occasionally and fall 
into groups of ladies and gentlemen. 
Invariably the sober companions had 
apologized and taken the charge away 
before any one discovered the loss of 
valuables. 



Stewart Heaters 

Will Save Fuel 

They have made good 
right here in Duluth. 

Don't buy a No-Name 
heater — one that the maker 
is ashamed of, when you can 

buy a 

STEWART FOR $25.00. 

TERMS, $1.00 PER WEEK 




GOOD ADVICE TO A BOY. 

Bobbv Orde, the hero of Stewart Ed- 
ward White's boy stories that are ap- 
pearing in the American Magazine, is 
said by many to be the author him- 
self when he was -that age. In the 
August issue of this periodical "The 
Hole in the Cap' is one of the Bobby 
Orde seriea and incidentally one of the 
best stories Mr. White has ever writ- 
ten. The following excerpt from the 
varn is in Mr. White's best vien: 

•'They had come out on the sand hills 
over the town. Mr. Kincaid drew up 
Bucephalus and contemplated it as it 
!av below them, its roofs half hidden in 
the mauve and lilac of bared branches, 
its columns of smoke rising straight 
up in the frosty air. 

•' 'Of course, I don't know, Bobby, 
whether you'll ever be a hunter or not. 
It all depends on where you live and 
how — the chance to get out, I mean. 
But, sonny, you can always be a sports- 
man, whatever you do. A sportsman 
tloes things because he likes them, 
Bobbv; for no other reason — not for 
moneV, nor to become famous, nor even 
to win — although all these things may 
come to him, and it is quite right 
that he take them and enjoy them. 
Only he does not do the things for 
them, but for the pleasure of doing. 
And a right man does not get pleasure 
In doing a thing if in any way he takes 
an unfair advantage. That's being a 
sportsman. And, after all, that's all I 
can teach you If we hunt together ten 
vears. Do you think you can remember 
that?' 

•• 'Yes, sir,' replied Bobby soberly. 

" 'There's only one other thing,' went 



CERTIFICATEOFINCORPORATION 

— OP- 
ALLIANCE REAL ESTATE COR- 
PORATION. 

We the undersigned, for the pur- 
pose of forming and being a corpora- 
lion under and by virtue of the provi- 
sions of Chapter 58, of the Kevised 
Laws of Minnesota for the year 190^, 
and all acts amendatory thereof, do 
hereby associate ourselves together as 
a body corporate and agree upon 
adopt the following Certificate of 
corporation: 

Article 1. , , ,, 

The name of this corporation shall 
be "Alliance Real Estate Corporation. 

The general nature of its business 
shall be to buy. sell, rent, lease, mort- 
gage and improve all kinds ot lands 
and tenements and to construct, im- 
prove lease, rent and sell houses and 
buildings of every description, to loan 
money, either for itself or as agent for 
others, upon mortgages or other securi- 
ties, to buy and sell mineral leases and 
timber, and money obligations secured 
upon real or personal property, to 
write all kinds of insurance and surety 
bonds as agent, to act as agent for in- 
surance companies and for owners of 
real estate, with power to execute all 
contracts. Incumbrances, transfers, re- 
leases and other documents and to do 
all such acts as are usually necessary, 
expedient or convenient to the trans- 
action of such business and such other 
enterprises or things as are incident 
thereto. The principal place of busi- 
ness of this corporation shall be the 
City of Duluth. St. Louis County, Min- 
nesota. 

Article 2. 

The time of the commencement of 
this corporation shall be the 16th day 
of October, A. D. 1909, and the period 
of its continuance shall be thirty (30) 

years. 

Article 3. 
The names and places of residence 
of the incorporators are Walter F, 
Dacev, C. C. Colton, M. L. Wiseman, 
G F. Roecker and C. Weinslein, all 
residing at Duluth, St. Louis County, 
Minnesota. 

Article 4. 
The government of this corporation 
and the management of its affairs Js 
hereby vested in a board of five (o) 
directors who shall be stockholders 
and, except as herein provided, shall 
be elected by the stockholders at their 
annual meeting, which shall be held 
on the first Tuesday In October of each 
year and who shall, immediately after 
such election, or as soon thereafter as 
practicable, elect the following officers, 
namely: a President, a Vice President 
a Secretary and a Treasurer. Any two 
offices, except that of President and 
Vice President, may be held by one 
person. The directors and officers of 
this corporation shall liold their re- 
offices for one year or until 
successors have been duly elected 
and entered upon the discharge of tlieir 
duties. , . ., , 

The flist annual meeting of this cor- 
poration shall be held on the first Tues- 
day in October, 1910, but until such 
time and until the directors tiiereat 
elected shall have qualified, the follow- 
ing persons shall compose and be the 
board of directors ot this corporation, 
namely: Walter F. Dacey, C. C. Col- 
ton M. L. Wiseman, G. F. Roecker and 
C Weinstein, whose places of residence 
and addresses are respectively at Du- 
luth Minnesota, and until such annual 
meeting is held and until the directors 
thereat chosen shall have elected of- 
ficers and until such officers shall have 
qualified the officers of this corpora- 
tion shall be Walter F, Dacey, Presi- 
dent; M. L. Wiseman, Vice President; 
C. C. Colton, Secretary, and G. L. 
Roecker, Treasurer. 

Article 5. 
The amount of the capital stock of 
this corporation shall be Fifty Thou- 
sand Dollars ($50,000.00), and the same 
shall be divided into five thousand 
(5 000) shares of Ten Dollars ($10.00). 
each, and said stock may be paid for 
in either money, property or services, 
as the board of directors shall elect 
and said stock shall be subscribed for 
at such times and in such amounts as 
may be prescribed by the board of 
directors. 

Article 6. 
The highest amount of Indebtedness 
or liability to which this corporation 
shall at anv time be subject shall be 
the sum of One Hundred Thousand 
Dollars ($100,000.00). 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. We have 
hereunto set our hands and seals this 
12th day of October, 1909. 

WALTER F. DACEY. 
C. C. COLTON. 
M. L. WISEMAN. 
G. F. ROECKER. 
C. WEINSTEIN, 
Signed, Sealed and Delivered 
in Presence of 
HENDRA, 
SPROAL, 
Witnesses. 



of Owner 

as known 

Board. 

Duluth, Morse 
Street. 
I.aice Avenue. 

E. R. Jefferson 282 

Uulutit I'roper, Sec- 
ond DIvlNiftn. 
MioiiiKnn Street. 
Athol Morton Miller. 268 
Athol Morton Miller. 270 
Athol Morton Miller. 272 



Lyman Wiley 266 

Uulutii Proper, Sec- 
ond DiviMion. 
Second Street. 

James L. Porter, east 

half 312 

Dulntli Proper, Sec- 
ond Diviitlon. 
Fourtli Street. 
J. .1. Janeway, north 

70 feet 314 

Catheis Drummond. .316 
(3ustaf N o 1 s t r o m, 

north half . . .v 32ft 

Cliaudier Park Addi- 
tion. 
George L. Raymond. ,. J2 

Marv Kerr 23 

Mary Kerr 34 

John H. Lllljander. ;■ 25 
John H. Lilljander.. 26 
CHiristena Anderson. . 27 

Carl Anderson 28 

Murdock 
et al . 



33 
33 
33 
19 



72 



105: 

lOS. , 

lo^r 



Murdock 

et al 
A. W. 



McGregor, 
McGregor, 



50 



$47.47 



28.18 
28.18 
31.55 
60.77 



14.60 



12.37 
35.83 

32.60 



2.23 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
8.07 
8.07 

8.03 

11.85 



Grytdahl.. 1 
Grytdahl.. 2 

Darling 3 

Darling. ... 4 
Darling.... 5 

Darling 6 

Darling 7 

Darling 8 

Darling.... 9 
Darling.... 10 

Darling 11 

Darling 12 

Darling 13 

Darling. ... 14 
Webber... 15 
Frank R. Webber... 16 
Ernest E. Williams 1 
Ernest E. Williams 2 
Ernest E. Williams 3 
Frederick Erickson . 4 
Fred Johnson, et al 6 

F. E. Eddy, et al 6 

Ulrick L. Lynott 7 

Josephine Anderson. 8 
Andrew Wlckstrom. 9 

Peter Tillman 10 

Peter Tillman 11 

August Lundgren . . 12 

F. C. Smith 13 

Smith 14 

Smith 15 

Smith 16 

Jarvis 1 

Jarvls 2 



F. C. 
F. C. 
F. C. 
Mary 
Mary 
Mary 
Mary 
Mary 
Mary 
Mary 
Mary 
Marv 
W. B. 



Jarvis 
Jarvis 
Jarvis 
Jarvis 
Jarvis 
Jarvis 
Jarvis 
Munson, 



that 



3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



16 
16 
16 

16 

16 



68 
68 
68 
68 
68 
68 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



ad- 



1 



Slackhouse, 
the unplatted por- 
tion of the NW»4 
of the SW^i4 of 
section 5, town.ship 
49, Range 14, lying 
on the northerly 
side of Fourth and 
within 132 feet of 
the northerly line 
of said street, 
between Fortieth 
avenue west and 
the east line of 
Chandler Park 

dition 

HalI'M Addition 

Oneotn. 
Flftli Street. 
L. A. Barnes, north 

36 feet 7 

L. A. Barnes, north 

36 feet 8 

HaiselTiood Park Dl- 
vinion. 

J. W. Lyder 5 

J. W^. Lyder 6 

Richard Forester, et 

al 7 

James Wedmark .... 8 

The Midland Co 9 

Nlcolene M. Hanson. 10 

Anton Hanson 11 

James A. Jennings.. 12 
Louise L i n d g r e n, 

south 33 feet 13 

Louise Lindgren .... 14 
Louise Lindgren .... 15 
Louise I.iindgren .... 16 
C'liandler Park Ad- 
dition. 
Ira E. Briggs, et al . , 29 
Ira E. Briggs, et al. . 30 
Ira E. Briggs, et al.. 31 
Ira E. Briggs, et al.. 32 
P Theodore Peterson, 

south 66 feet 17 

P. Theodore Peterson, 

south 66 feet 18 

P. Theodore Peterson, 

south 66 feet 19 

P. Theodore Peterson, 

south 66 feet 20 

Blanch B. Brlgham.. 21 

Nels Johnson 22 

Nels Johnson 23 

Nels Johnson 24 

Nels Johnson 25 

Honore Bolat 26 

Albert L. Wright 27 

Frederick C. Ros- 

borough 28 

Murray A Howe'a 

.Addition. 
Richard Thayer 
Thayer 
Thayer 
Thayer 
Thayer 
Addition 



unplatted land ly- 
ing on the south- 
erly side and 
within 140 feet of 
the southerly side 
of Thirteenth street 
and between Mer- 
chants Park divi- 
sion and Lincoln 

park 

Duiuth Heigbta, Fifth 
DiviMion, Hugo 
Street. 
Joseph A. Campbell. 1 

Hugh Fawcett 34 

Duluth IleightH, Fifth 
Divittion, Niagara 
Street 
Hubbard Company . . 1 

Frank L. Stone 32 

John Shea 1 

Axel Wickstrom ... 32 
London Addition, 

Cook Street. 
Lakeside Land Co.. 9 
Lakeside Land Co.. 10 
Lakeside Land Co.. 11 
Lakeside Land Co.. 12 
Lakeside Land Co.. 13 
Lakeside Land Co.. 16 
Lakeside Land Co.. 16 
Howard De Mott. ... 9 

Howard De Mott 10 

Howard De Mott 11 

West Park Division, 

Vernon Street. 
John Hagelin, et al.. 9 
Charley Hegelin, et 

al 10 

Toledo Investment 

Co.. et al 11 

Ole A. Berg 12 

Toledo Investment 

Co.. et al 6 

Investment 

al 7 

Investment 

al 8 

Investment 

al 9 

Investment^ 

al .•^ 

Nelson 11 

Nelson 12 



62.17 

14.35 
14.35 



17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



to 



(Seal.) 
(Seal.) 
(Seal.) 
(Seal.) 
(Seal.) 



T. 
R. 



J. 
W. 



Richard 
Richard 
Richard 
Richard 
Hail's 

Oneota. 
.\ndrew L. Apland . . 9 
Andrew L. Apland.. 10 

W. D. Bailey H 

W. D. Bailey 12 

W. D. Bailey 13 

Carl O. Brussell 14 

Carl O. Brussell 15 

Carl O. Brussell 16 

Duluth Proper, Third 

Division. 
Seventh Street. 
Frank L. Rittel 

Education. 

Education. 

Education. 

Education . 

Education 



Board 
Board 
Board 
Board 
Board 
Board 
Duluth 



of 
of 
of 

of 

of 

of Educatton. '79 
Proper, Third 



45 
69 
71 

73 
75 
77 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
On this 12th day of October, A- D. 



DiviMion 
Eighth Street. 

C a r 1 e t o n College, 

west half 69 

Malcolm H a g g e r t, 

east half 69 

August Kehtel, west 

half 71 

Ernst Gnifke 73 

Fred B e n n e w e i ». 

east half 75 

Albert F. Braun. 

west half 75 

Henry Lockwood ... 77 
Isam L. McAdams... 79 
Norton's Division, 

Ninth Street. 
Emma . Wickstrom, 

west half 4 

Charles Perrinfc- 



) 

9 

■J 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

9 
9 
9 
9 



9 
9 
9 
9 

8 

8 

8 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 



7 
7 
7 

7 
7 
7 
7 

7 



86 
«4 

84 
84 
84 
}i4 
84 



121 

121 

121 
121 

121 

121 
121 
121 



16 



7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 

7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 



7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
9.20 

9.20 

7.93 

7.93 

7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 

6.70 



12.02 

10.00 

7.93 

7.93 

1.23 



21.70 
21.70 
21.70 
21.70 
21.70 
21.70 
21.70 
21.70 



25.78 
25.78 
29.80 
29.04 
25.79 
25.79 
27.85 



. 8.60 

9.05 

9.00 
17.18 

8.60 

8.60 
17.19 
17.19 



4.75 



Toledo 

Co., et 
Toledo 

Co.. et 
Toledo 

Co.. et 
Toledo 

Co.. et 
Adolf 
Adolf 

Walbanks Addition, 
Wellington Street. 

J. E. Bowers 1 

Wladyslav Trojan- 

owski 2 

Joseph Mushynskl.. 3 

Mathew Sternal 6 

Mattis Sternal 7 

Louis Biernat 9 

Joseph Slosnka .... 10 
Thomas Szustak ... 11 
Thomas Szustak ... 12 

M. M. Glover 5 

M. M. Glover 6 

M. M. Glover 9 

Simon T. Charnow- 

ski 10 

Tri«!;e's 
Bay 

siou, V 

John Mattson ...... 12 

Neil Matheson 13 

Nils Llndfors 14 

Ilnxelivood Addition, 
Rene Street. 

Ann S. Mair 5 

Ann S. Mair 6 

H. H. Phelps, west 

half 7 

Mrs. George Little, 

east half 7 

Mehltabel Grover ... 8 
Harrington's Addi- 
tion, Magellan 
Street. 

Gallasch. . . 1 

Gallasch... 2 

Gallasch... 3 

Hedlund ... 4 

J. Sundin. . . 5 

J. Sundin... 6 

J. Sundin... 7 

J. Sundin... 8 

Realty Co... 1 

Realty Co... 2 

Realty Co. . . 3 

Realty Co. . . 4 

M. Culbert 



& Kennedy's 

Front Divi- 

Coates Street. 



Adolf G. 

Adolf G, 

Adolf G 

Andrew 

Charles 

Charles 

Charles 

Charles 

Albany 

Albany 

Albany 

Albany 

Orlena 

son . 
Orlena 

son . 
Orlena 

son . 
Orlena 

son . 
Oneota. 
George 
George 
George 
George 
Fred A 



M. 

M.' 
M.' 



Culbert- 
Culb'e'rt- 
Cu'lb'er't- 



Raymond. 
Raymond . 
Raymond . 
Raymond. 
Patrick 



5 
6 

7 

8 

1 
2 
3 
4 

9 
10 
11 
12 



St. 



A. H. Donald 

Eric Myhrman 

Olaf MyhKman 

West End Addition, 

Main Street. 
Hans J. Petraborg.. 

B. H. Riebel 

Thomas H. Fairfax.. 
West Duluth, Fourth 

Division, Polk 
Street. 
Julia A. BartcJn 

C. R. Keyes 

Eva Harbour, west 

25 feet 

Clara A. Burnsides, 
east 100 feet 

Robert A. Low. . 

Upper Dulntli, 
Croix Avenue. 

Lake Shore. 

Julia McDonald 

Mable A. Pearce 

Mable A. Pearce 

Mable A. Pearce 

Induoitrinl Division. 

Uenrrangeinent 
Diocks 7 and 8. 

Western Land Asso- 
ciation 15 

Marshall-Wells Hard- 
ware Co 

Charles Hill 

C. H. Clark 

Cowell's Addition. 

St. Croix Avenue. 

Zenith Investment 

Co 

Zenith Investment 

Co • 

Zenith Investment 

Co • 

Zenith Investment 

Co 

Industrial Division. 

East End Ice Co.... 
East End Ice Co., 



.294 
.296 
.298 
.300 



13 
13 
24 
24 



71 
71 
71 
71 

71 

70 
71 

72 
72 
72 



3 

3 

3 
3 

• 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 
16 
16 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
7 
7 



6 
6 



8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
9 
9 



34 
34 
34 
34 
47 
47 
47 
47 



1 
5 
6 



94 
93 

92 

92 
91 







DEFECTIVE PAGE 



4.75 
9.50 
9.50 

9.50 

10.07 



3.97 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
8.93 
14.04 

3.96 
7.93 
7.93 
8.18 
8.92 
8.76 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
9.21 



7.93 
7.93 
7.92 
7.92 
7.92 
7.92 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.94 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 



trustee 
William 

trustee 
William 



21 
21 



9 105 



30.47 



24.70 
23.94 



34.38 
34.38 
35.06 
34.38 



9.50 
9.50 
9.50 
9.50 
9.50 
6.62 
9.50 
9.50 
9.50 
9.50 



11.90 

11.90 

11.90 
14.75 

11.90 

16.23 

19.38 

20.11 

22.02 
17.73 
13.65 



4.38 

4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.37 
4.90 
7.94 
7.94 
7.94 

7.94 



south half 5 1 

Western Land Asso- 
ciation, north half 5 1 
Western Land Asso- 
ciation 6 1 

August Signer Es- 
tate 7 1 

August Signer Es- 
tate 8 1 

August Signer Es- 
tate, south half. . . 9 1 
Joseph Wiita, north 

half 9 1 

Joseph Wiita 10 1 

Sarah A. Banks 11 1 

OIka Johnson 12 1 

Clyde Iron W^orks.. 13 1 

Clyde Iron Works.. 14 1 

Clyde Iron Works.. 15 1 

Hugh Miscampbell . . 16 1 

Hugh Miscampbell . . 17 1 

Herman Hermanson, 

et al 18 1 

Industrial Division, 

Lake Ave. South. 
Western Land Asso- 
ciation, north 35 

feet 2 2 

Western Land Asso- 
ciation 4 2 

Kearransement of 

Blocks 7 and 8. 
Western Land Asso- 
ciation, north 25 

feet 12 

Thomas F. Trevillion, 
south 25 feet...... 12 

Thomas F. Trevillion, 

north 22 feet 13 

Alpine McLean, south 

28 feet 13 

Upper Dulntii. 
William D. Sohier, 

273 

D. Sohier, 

275 

D. Sohier, 

trustee 277 .. 

William D. Sohier. 

trustee 279 . . 

Norton's Division, 

Sixth Avenue East. 
Emma G. Godding, 

north half 16 5 

Jennie Bloom, north 

35 of south 70 feet 16 5 

Lakeview Division, 
Ninth Avenue East. 
Mary Jane Croll.... 1 
Mary Jane Croll.... 16 
Eudiou Division, Six- 
teenth Avenue East. 
Gustaf A. Frederick 

son 

Hiehlaud Park Addi- 
tion, Twentieth 
Avenue East. 
Renrrangeiueut of 

It luck ITt. 
Dickerman Invest- 
ment Co 1 

Dickerman Invesf- 

ment Co 2 

Dickerman Invest- 
ment Co 3 

Annie M. Jarchow . . 16 
Dickerman Invest- 
ment Co 1 

London Addition, 

Fortieth Ave. East. 
Oliver Eisciien, et al 1 
Oliver Elschen, et al 16 

Daniel R. Wilkie 1 

Willis J. Holmes. ... 16 
Ida Josephine Wat- 
son 1 

Ida Josephine Wat- 
son 16 

Daniel R. Wilkie... 1 
Daniel R. Wilkie... 16 
London Addition, 

Korty-lirst Ave. E. 
W. A. Hicken. et al 8 
Elizabeth O. Davis.. 9 
Duluth Proper, Third 
Division, Sixth 
Avenue West, 
Addie S. D. Baldwin 97 34 
Duluth Proper, Third 
Division, 3>inth 
Avenue West. 
George M. (Jould. . . .144 36 
Duluth Proper, Third 
Division, Eleventh 
Avenue AVest. 
Henry Johnson, 

north half 177 65 

Annie J. Hetebrug- 

ger, south half... 177 65 
William F. Hille- 

brand 178 «5 

Mary R. White 177 69 

Duluth Proper, Sec- 
ond DiviMion, 
Twelfth Ave. W. 
Annie E. Church- 
man 191 67 

Alice Haycroft 192 *)7 

Duluth Proper, Sec- 
ond Division, Six- 
teenth Ave. West. 
Lawrence P. Drohan, 

et al 257 58 

Harold Thorson ....2o8 58 
Myer's KcarrauKC- 

nient, Duluth Prop- 
er, Second Division, 
Nineteenth Ave. W. 
Charles Sanborn, 

south half 19 106 

Ole Elgstrom, north 

half 19 106 

Charles Sanborn, 

north half 20 106 

Soren Olson, south 

half 20 106 

Arthur C. Farrar... 21 106 
Nels P. Nelson, north 

half 22 106 

Lena L u n d q u i s t, 

south half 22 106 

Charles M. Hoffleng 24 106 
Lillian E. Kjeilin... 8 128 

G. R. Brooks 10 128 

Louis Lindgren, 

south half 11 128 

Louis M. Nelson, 



10.10 

10.40 

25.79 

25.79 

25.79 

12.89 

12.89 
25.79 
25.79 
13.51 
25.79 
25.79 
20.79 
25.79 
21.49 

25.79 



29.21 
30.44 

15.97 
18.52 
16.98 
21.77 

30.12 
30.12 
30.12 
36.05 



13.30 
6.46 



73.11 
73.11 



29.18 



north 
Charles 

north 
Duluth 



north half 

Duluth Proper, Sec- 
ond Division. 

Nils Olson -3"^ 

Annie Johnson, south 

75 feet 306 

George R. Green, 
south 37% feet of 

75 feet 306 

Johnson. 
371/i feet... 306 
Proper, Sec- 
ond Division, 
Twenty-third Ave- 
nue West. 

Jacob Low 3<o 

Western Land Asso- 
ciation .370 

Nels Havland, south 

50 feet -369 

Mina Aamold, north 
55 of south 10a 

feet •■3b9 

John Hall, north 28 

feet 370 

John F. Appleby, 

south 112 feet 3.0 

John F. Appleby 369 

Duluth Proper, Sec- 
ond Division, 
Twenty-Seventh 
Avenue West. 
Wisconsin Central 

Railway Co 434 

Helm Addition. 

Julia W. Coleman. . . 1 

Walbauk's Addition, 

Grand Forks Ave. 
Michael Duczmal ... 12 

Agnes Costello 12 

West Park Division, 

Pacific Avenue. 
Toledo Investment 

Co.. et al 12 

Ole A. Berg 12 

Daniel A. Dickenson 1 
Marine Division, 

Thirty-first Ave- 
nue West. 

Henry Kohnen a 

West Duluth. Fourth 
Division, Fifty- 
ninth Ave. West. 

Willis J. Holmes 1 

WIIHs J. Holmes 

Willis J. Holmes 

Willis J. Holmes 

H. 1'. Warner 

Bernard Heller, et al 

Mark D. Wilbur 

Mark D. Wilbur 

John Nelson 

Nels P. Gronberg... 
Benjamin Hoopes . . 
Benjamin Hoopes 
John Pederson, et 
Pederson. et 
D. Peterson. 



12 128 



107 
107 

107 
107 

169 
147 
181 

181 

173 

173 
173 



44 



12 



al 
al 
et 



3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 



2 

3 

17 



21 



290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 
290 



15 

11 



10 
10 

11 

11 
23 
23 



24 

24 



8.55 

8.55 

8.55 
26.60 

23.65 



17.67 
26.60 
26.60 
26.10 

26.60 

26.60 
42.02 
26.60 



25.65 
26.60 



72.63 



28.75 



45.64 

45?B4 

89.39 
89.39 



19.77 
62.01 



69.77 
47.33 



16 
13 
14 
15 
16 



6 

7 
8 



290 
283 
283 
283 
283 



96 
9C 
96 

96 
96 

96 



10 96 



13.98 
13.98 
13.97 

13.97 

27.87 

14.20 

14.20 
49.84 
52.45 
25.04 

11.10 



John 

^''ll r:.. ■.":.::..... is 290 

Carl D. Peterson, et 

al 

J. D. Becher 

J. D. Becher 

Amelia Traphagen.. 

Amelia Traphagen.. 

W'est Duluth. Sixth 
DiviNlou. Sixtieth 
Avenue West. 

Oscar Hill 

Peter Johnson 

Jacob llolma 

Herbert L. Pratt, et 

al 

Cina B. Johnson.... 

West Duluth Land 
Co • 

West Duluth Land 
Co • 

West Duluth Land 
Co 

Gust Risberg, et al. . 

Nels P. Grahm 

John Bugold 

Lew I ). Schott 

Lew D. Schott 

Macfnrlane's Addi- 
tion, Sixty-third 
Avenue West. 

Anna Zell 

I Dodge's Addition. 

Charles S. Sargent.. 

\Vest End Addition, 
Sixty-fourth Ave- 
nue W'est 

August Johnson .... 

August Johnson .... 

W. J. Holmes 

Neil Mack 

Frank J. Evans 

J. K. Newell 

Emil Johnson 

Emil Johnson 

John G. Ostby 

William H. Seldon.. 

William H. Seldon.. 

M. Kamrrrerer 

M. Kammerer 

Susannah Johnstone. 

C. H. Davidson 

C. H. Davidson 

Hunter's Grassy 
Point Addition. 

Douglas M. Dreweth 1 

Douglas M. Dreweth 2 

Alexander Dunel ... 3 

Alexander Dunel ... 4 

John Bergum 5 

John Bergum 6 

Clinton Place .Addi- 
tion, Sixty-seventh 
.Avenue West. 

Charles Mehling ... 1 

Charles Mehling ... 2 

Grassy Point Addi- 
tion. 

John Doyon 1 

W. J. Holmes 2 

Albert S. Chase 3 



11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



16 

12 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 



96 
96 
96 
96 
96 
96 



31 



2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 

2 

2 

o 

^ 

2 

2 

2 

2 
o- 



21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 



20 
20 



28 
28 
28 



11.10 

33.40 
24.81 

12.44 
12.44 



74.40 

69.25 
26.17 

28.93 

18.77 

55.67 
71.82 



68.52 
35.66 



22.44 
21.91 



30.92 
32.99 
32.99 



46.75 



10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
lO.SS 

10.85 

10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.85 
10.S5 



4.99 
10.85 
10.85 

10.85 
11.24 

14.44 

13.52 

10.86 
10.86 
10.86 
10.86 
10.86 
10.86 



3.85 
23.65 



4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.38 
4. 38 
4.38 
4.38 
4.3S 
4.38 
4.3S 
4.39 
4.39 
4.90 



4.39 
4.39 
4.39 
4.39 
4.39 
4.39 



2.80 
4.38 



4.90 
4.38 
1.60 



Total 
Official: 



$6,379.21 

J. W. PRESTON, 

President. 
R. MURCHISON. 
Clerk, Board Public Works. 
/Opal ) 
D. E.H., Oct. 15, 16 and 18, 1909. D. 288. 



7.93 
7.93 
8.89 



15.86 
15.86 

7.93 

7.93 
17.12 



9.20 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 
9.20 
7.93 
7.93 
7.93 

7.93 

7.93 

7.93 

7.93 

17.13 
15.86 
15.86 
15.86 
17.14 
15.86 
15.86 
15.86 



61.25 
56.43 
35.37 



40.92 
40.92 

9.20 

31.72 
40.92 



25.32 
25.32 
25.32 
31.96 



25.94 



20 
21 
22 


• • 

• • 

• • 


7.89 
25.79 
16.51 


2 


• • 


23.72 


4 


• • 


20.63 


6 


• • 


20.63 


8 


• ■ 


12.89 


4 


1 


25.79 



3 



, Office of the 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

City of Duluth, Minn., Oct. 8, 1909. 
Tn the matter of the condemnation of right-of-way for a new Herman- 

of October A D. 1909, at its ottice in the City of Duluth, meet to as- 
certain and award the amount of damages caused by the taking of private 
nroD^^nV^n this proceeding, and, after having heard the evidence adduced, 
and having viewed the premises to be taken, we do hereby award and as- 
sess the damages to the premises to be taken as shown In the following 
Ichldu e showfnj the description of each tract and parcel to be taken the 
name of' the ovvner so far as known to said Board and the amount of dam- 

^^^ Vh°e moVrtrfo be taken under this proceeding is those portions of the 
several lots^and parcels of land hereinafter described which lie within thirty- 
three feet of either side of the following described line, to-wit: 

commencing at a point on the center line of Piedmont avenue and the 
northTnTsouth section line of section 32, township 50. range 14 737. /O feet 
?rnni thrmonumert in the center of section 32: thence at an angle from tlie 
secUon line of ?6 degrees 48 minutes to the left 123.9 feet to a point which 
frtle be"fnning of the line; thence at an angle of 17 degrees 7 minutes to 
JhP He-ht^a distfnce of 228.35 feet to a point; thence at an angle of 9 degrees 
V(^ m n tes to the ?eft a distance of 390.75 feet to a point; thence at an angle 
of 24 delrees 48 minutes to the left, a distance of 757 feet to a point; thence 
at an anallof 37 degrees 11 minutes to the left a distance of 614.7 feet to 
a point thence at an angle of 29 degrees 28 minutes to the right a distance 
of 1 9 27 felt to a polnti thence at an angle of 12 degrees 4 minutes to the 
?ieht a distance of 421 feet to a point; thence at an angle of 18 degrees 53 
mfnutes to t1ie right 252 feet to a point; thence at an ang e of 7 degrees 37 
m nutll to the rilht 724.4 feet to a point; thence at an ang e of 12 degrees 54 
m nutll to thi riiht a distance of 1.53 7 feet to a point; thence at an angle 
S ''6 degrees 15 minutes to the right a distance of 1,019 feet to a point; 
thence at an angle of 18 degrees 45 minutes to the left a distance of S98 feet 
i^ n nnfnt thenSe at an angle of 20 degrees 40 minutes to the right a dis- 
fance^of 402 feet tVa point; thence at an angle of 19 degrees 1 minute to the 
left a distance of 1,239 feet to a point; thence at an angle of 16 degrees 54 
mlmues to the right a distance of 455 feet; tlience at an angle of 4 degrees 44 
minutel to the right a distance of 873 feet to a point on the center line of the 
old Hermantown road. Amount of 
Name of Owner so Far Description of Property. Damages 
as Known to Board ^l.tti 
Section 30, Township 50, Rause 14. , . . * ,i, ^o*^*'« 
.John F. Appleby, northeast quarter of southwest quarter of north- 
west quarter ' 

M. Alice Stultz, southeast quarter of southwest quarter of northwest 

quarter :, '^-O" 

Mary E. Sibbitt, et al, northeast quarter of northwest quarter of 

southwest quarter • ■■•• • • • • •; ; i-liA 

Thomas L Blood executor, northeast quarter of southwest quarter.... 7o.00 
The Atlas Investment Co., et al, east half of southeast quarter of 

southwest QU3.rtcr ov.vd 

A Buchanan, south half of west half of southwest quarter of south- 

east quarter loo.otf 

Section 31, Township 50, Ranee 14. ., » » irn ixn 

Mary Russell Abell, northwest quarter of northeast quarter ^^',^99 

Mary R. Farnum, northeast quarter ot northeast quarter 10.00 

Beriah Magoffin, southeast (luarter of northeast quarter 2o.0« 

Section »2, Township 50, RanRe 14. , ., * * 

The Manlstique Bank, north 16 of south 32 acres of southwest quarter 

of northwest quarter , • • • ••• l-o-OO 

Hamilton M. Peyton, south 16 acres of southwest quarter of north- 

west quarter •"" 

The Duluth Banking Co., north half of north half and north half of 

south half of north half of southeast quarter of northwest quarter 125.00 
W B Munson. south half of south half of north half of southeast 

quarter of northwest quarter ^ -06 

Total $700.12 

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Public Works will attend at 
its office, in the City Hall building, at 10 o'clock A. M.. on the Twenty-ftfth 
day of October A. D. 1909, for the purpose of hearing objections to said assess- 
ments- that all objections made thereto mu.st be filed in writing with said 
Board' at least one day prior to the time above specified, and that, unless 
sufficient cause is shown to the contrary, the said assessment so made as 
aforesaid will be confirmed. 

J ^^ PRESTON. President. 
Official: R. MURCHISON. 

Clerk Board Of Public Works. 

D.^lf^IL, Oct. iS, 1909. D. 287. 



>fc 






C 



tm^mrtrtvitBi^ 



«r- 



••.♦ 






^ 



W> 



I 



rri 




*•« 



Jl_^ 



THE UULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



r*- 







We Best Butter 
Test 



'■ Sticks ■■ wiiere- 

ever Ifs tried; it 

It too good to be 
%vithout — per lb. 
can.aocj 3-lb. can. 



30 E. Superior Si. The Low Price Store. Both Pliones 1991. 



Quality Meat Market Bargains 

Xo market in Diiliith eiijojs a better reputation for QLALITY, and at no OTHER 5LVUKET of QUALITY 
can yoti obtain such prices. 

^.o.N OR PouTr:RHOLSE icg I Pork Loins 'i2V2c ! ^ir;^.'!^.^..^'".".*!^'^' lOc 



Extra fliotcr Steer Rib 

Boiling Beef, per lb., ttc ai 
Rx«ra <kolce Steer Pot 

Hoast. per lb.. lOo and... 

Kxtra rhoiee Steer Family 

Slt-ak. per lb.. ISV^c and.. 

Kxtra ChoU-e Rib Ruant, 

per lb., l«e, lie and 

Kxtra Choice Susar-cured 

Be.n". por lb, 10c, Sc 

and 

Kxtra Choice Hauibtireer 

.■^leak. per lb 

Saicar-cnred Sniuked Butts, 

per lb 



>d.. 5c 

8c 

lOc 

IZ'/jc 

CorueU 

6c 

lOe 
20c 



Fancy Mllk-(ed Broilcrn, 

per lb 

Fresli Ure«»ed Chlckeus, 

lb 

noMton Style Pork Cbopa, 

(extra leann per lb. . . . 
Manchester Pure Pork Saii 

(wltli Tomato Sauce), 

Pork .Sausage on the 

market, per lb 

>ew Sauer Kruat. 

per lb 

Little PiK Pork Roniit, 



lb. 



Fancy SyrtuK Ducki*, 

per lb 



20c 
18c 
i4c 

sase, 

he be.st 

...iSc 
5c 

l2'/2c 
20c 



Cboice Mutton Chops, 

per lb 

Choice Lamb Chopa, 

per lb.. 18c and 

Choice Hlndauarters Veal, lOiAc 

Choice Veal Chops, 

per lb., 15c and 

Choice Veal Roasts, (with 

pocket.s lor dressing) 

per lb 

SuKar-cured llnms, whole 

or half, per lb 

Round Stcnk, 



lb. 



I2>/3C 
15c 



|2>/2G 

I2V2C 

18c 
I2V2C 




The everyday test of taste is the best butter test, but you had bet- 
ter make sure that there is nothing crooked hiding behind that dainty 
color and smell and flavor. 

PRIMUS BUTTER 

Will please the most critical palate. It is appetizing. PRIMUS 
butter will stand the most searching laboratory test. It is pure. No 
meal is complete without it. 

OUR VELVET ICE CREAM 

Ha.s won favor over that of any other make, and it has been accom- 
plished by the strictly pure pasteurized cream that we always use ex- 
clusively, together with the just-right knowledge of how to prepare 
it in every little detail All flavors in bulk or bricks. Give your Sun- 
day orders if you can, on Saturday. 

BRIDGEMAN-RUSSELL CO., 

16 WEST FIRST STREET. 
Both 'Phones, 352. 



sPKCi AL ti-:a sale 

I NCOL«»RED JAP.AA, 40c aiiality, 
toia.*rrowr, lb 



25c 



20 



Pounds Granulated 
pound Capitol Tea 



Sui;ar with every 
at 60c, any flavor. 



$1 



S.VVIXOl 



.L-ic 



(illOtKRIES AT 
PRICKS 
Capital Chocolate, 

:;:.(- oake.s a I only. 
< apitol Cocoa, 

L'.'ic cans at only 15c 

50c bottle Pure Ollve Oil 

(for medicinal U3e)..40« 
1 r.Oc can Ripe Oli»e» 

(containing from 100 

ti> 1-5 01ive.s> Me 

Full quarts Maple 

Svrup "*5<^ 

New LentllM, per ll> Sc 

3 lariKc pkgs. Pop Com. 35c 
1 can Royal IlakinK 

Powder 

1 15c can Ockra 

( for tlie .soup) . . . 
'J l.'>c pkK.<«. Pancake 

Flour 25c 

Fancy Shelled Walnuts at 

our low price, per lb. 35c 



FRUITS AS^D VEGETABLES 



FINEST t O.NCORD CiRAPES, 

Per basket 

FAXCV C.\BB.iGE, Solid Heads, 
Per 100 lbs 



20c 
85c 



.40c 
lOc 



Fancy Cranberries, 

per qt 10c 

Fancy Jersey Sweet 

Potatoes. Ib.s 35c 

Extra Choice Quinces, 

per pk T5c 

New York Preserving 

Pears, per pk 70c 

Keefer Preservlnn Pears, 

per pk 55c 

Tokay Grapes, extra 

fancy, per basket ... .40c 
Fancy CauliHower » while 

lat lasist, per head.. 10c 



Bananas, 

doz., S5c, 20c and 15c 

Rockyford Melons, 

10c, Sc and 5c 

Tolman Sweet .Apples, 

per pk 05c 

Cooklnte and Pie .Apples, 

pk 45c, 40c and 35c 

Potatoes, per bu 50c 

Red Onions, per pk....25c 



SPECIAL PRICE 

Bulk Peanut Butter, 20c 

per lb., 3 lbs. for 50c 

Yacht Club Salad Dressing 

(it is delicious), 1.5c 
size at !<>« 

Pet Peerless Poppy Mllk^, 

3 cans for 25c 

3 cans Tomatoes 25c 

2 25c bottles Gedney'a 
Pickles (to close 

out) 3.5c 

3 10c pkKs. Dr. Price's 

; Celery Food 35c 

Is cans Baked Beans.... 17c 
3 large bottles Pure 

Catsup 25c 

3 cans 15c value 

Homiiiy 32« 






T 



HE 




TH CASH MARKET 



14 West First Street. 



GEO. O. SMITH, Mgr. 



Order }our Meats for Sunday from a 
market that is not only sanitary in every re- 
spect, but also carries the finest line of 
Fresh and Smoked Meats in the city. 



Fancy Beef Pot Roast, Ib..8@10^ 

Fancy Beef Stew, per lb 5< 

Fancy Rib Roasts, lb.lO@12H< 

Fancy Mutton Rqast, lb 10< 

Fancy Mutton Stew, p<;r lb.... 6^ 

Fancy Veal Roast, per lb lO^ 

Fancy Veal Stew, per lb Hf 



Finest little Pig Sausages, lb. 15^ 
Sausage Meat, per lb 10^ 



Hams 

Hamburger, per lb... 

Wieners, per lb 

Bologna, 3 for 



. . 13c 
..lOf 

..lot 

..Z5t 



Give us your order for Sunday dinner. You'll never regret it. 





T- 



A GOOD THING TO TIE TO! 




If you want Flour that makes white, whole- 
some bread — flour that is made exclusive 
from the choicest Dakota hard spring: 
^-heat — rtour that never varies — flour that 
satisfies all the time — you'll find UNI- 
VERSAL FLOUR about the best thing to 
tie to in the world. 

The housekeeper who mixes her bread 
with this flour will have light, palatable 
bread, with a large percentage of gluten 
and other nutrients. Just try a sack. 

THE FLOUR THE BEST COOKS USE. 

MADE IN DULUTH 
"The Pittsburgh of the Wcsr 



Duluth Universal Milling Company 




> 



COX BROS. MAR 

101 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 




ARE YOUR LIVING EXPENSES 
TOO HIGH? 

Bv showing how vou may .save money in buying your Meats, we think 
we can help vou cut down living expenses. 

T*KE ADV\'ST\GE OF Ol R' SATLKD.4V SPECIAL S.4I,ES. ^ e off ei- 
you The ^est of MeaVs at the lowest prices. FOB CASH, take your choice 
of these bargains: 

I.EO OF SPRIXG LAMB — Per lb -]^ 

BEST CIT RIB ROAST— Per lb ^'Y^ 

BEHT CIT SIHI.OIN STK4K — Per lb ••»< 

BEST POT BOAST— Per lb -\y^' 

FI.NE VEAL RtlASTS — Per lb 1- /aC 

Our SprinK Chickens and Fowls are Extra Nice. 



WE SATISFY TELEPHONE CUSTO.MER.S. 



-^Jt^. 



LOWEST PRICES 

FOR STRAIGHT GOODS 

Wholesale and Retail 

To the Family Traiie 

We handle none but Straight Port and Sherries, 
the best and oldest Straight Brandies and Whiskies, 
and the choicest brands of Table Wines. 

"WANIGAS" The Bast Whiskey Made 

WALLS FAMILY 
LIQUOR STORE 

310 W«st Supsrior St. 

OHiiith, Minn. 



John Logan & Co., 

932 EAST FOURTH ST. 
Phones : New, 363; Old. 1227. 

CAN TOMATOES— Fancy hand- 
packed, IZ'Ac cans, each 10^ 

Tlie.se are new packed, doz. $1.15 
STANDARD TOMATOES— 

lOc cans cut to, each 70 

per dozen SO*" 

HART BRAND PEARS— 

15c cans cut to 12f 

CAN PINE APPLES— 

20c regularly, per can 15f 

CAN PEARS — Packed ni heavy 

syrup, 25c value, cut to 21^ 

CALUMET BAKING POWDER, 

1 lb. cans, each 21f 

COLUMBIA MINCE MEAT— 

Regular 10c pkgs.. each 7c 

JERSEY SWEET POTATOES— 

6 lbs. for 35<* 

Fresh vegetables in abundance, 
fancy cauliflower, head lettuce, 
leaf lettuce, Milwaukee celery, 
radishes, green onions, egg plant. 
WE SELL NOKOMIS COFFEE. 




CUT FLOWERS 
and PLANTS 

Buy a nice Fern or Palm 
for your house now, 

Also Roses, Carnations, 
Violets, Lilies, Etc. in cut 
flowers. 




Funeral Designs Made Upon Short Notice. 

J. J. le:boriovs 



92 1 East Third Street. 



Both Phones. 



GENUINE 




Pies, Cakes, Bread. Dough- 
nuts, etc. Made fresh every- 
day. We deliver to all parts 
of the city . 

In our Grocery depart- 
ment we carry a full line. 
Our prices are low, the 
goods are always fresh. 



GASSERS 

209-211 W. Superior St. 

Potatoi"«, very fine for puttin"^ 

awa.v. per bu »0c 

Coneoitls. per ba^tket 20e 

Delaware Grapes, ba.sket 30e 

Tokay Grapes, basket 45o 

liarjye liakiiig; Apples, peck. . . .50c 
Buckwheat Flour, 10-lb sacks. .45c 

Maple Syrup, per gal $1.25 

Crab Apples, |)er peck 60c 

Pre-stTvinj; Pears, peck. 50c and 60c 
Dawson Plums, 16-quart case. $1.90 
New AsparuRus Tips. 3 cans. .$1.00 
l^Our Baker>' department is a 
{»reat .succe.s.s — there is a reason. 
Oni GOODS AUE LIKE MOTHER 
MAKES. 






F. J. FILES 

GROCERY. 

926 East Second Street. 

Old Phone, 2570. 



A Dulutli Authority 

— SAVS — 

That one wonian in fivi' in a bread- 
winner, which nsaj l»e (rue, but it in 
alMU Maiti that only one in about five 
hundred enn malte eood l>read. 
Why not buy Hon Tou bread nud 
save a vaftt amount of trouble. 
AVEDDINO CAKES 1 ORDER. 
CHOICE COM-'ECnONERY. 







OSTBY'S 
CHOCERY 

32 East Fourth St. 

Gash Prices for 
Saturday 

Fresh Eggs per Pfic 

dozen fcwM 

Creamery Butter, per QP|* 

pound wfcl# 

Good Standard Corn, fi5c 

1 dozen cans at w w V 

Good Standard Peas, 8SC 

1 dozen cans at Oww 

Van Camp's Bouillon Soup, 9C|% 
3 cans at fcww 

Van Camp's Hominy, ORgk 

3 cans at fcWU 

Bestine Dirt Cleaner, C^ 

per can wW 

Washing Powder, PiRc 

8 packages for fc WW 

Home-made Jelly, P5P 

two glasses for fc wU 



us West Superior St. 



In order to construct the Manches- 
tenship canal, over 51.000.000 cubic 
yards had to be excavated. 



F. E. Guyctt. 

107 West Fourth St. 

Zenith 'phone. 451. Old, 1188-M. 

The market of good values; 
honesty and good weight. 

Round Steak, per lb 15c 

Shoulder Steak, best, per lb 10c 

Rib Roast, per lb 12i^@15c 

Pot Roast ,per lb lOc 

Pork Chops, per lb. . 16c 

Pork Steak, per lb . . 15c 



A New Yorker earRifig- |15 a week Is 
sued for >100 a week a.imony. 



^■•■■"^■^^ 




FOLrZ 

GROCERY 
COMPANY 

117 EAST SUPERIOR ST. 
Phones : Old 234 ; New 234 & 48 

Fancy Concord Grapes Iftf^ 

Per basket — special I^^w 

Burbank Potatoes, 

Per bushel — special... 

Tokay Grapes, 

Per ba.'iket 

Blue Plums, 

Per basket 

Crab Apples — 

Per peck 

Cabbage — 

Per 100 lbs — 

Fancy hard stock.., 

Onions — 

All kinds — per peck. 

Apples — 95c 

Per peck — for cooking fc^r^r 

Peaches — 

Per case 



MINNEAPOLIS 

MEAT MARKET 

304 E. SUPERIOR ST. 

Best Prime Native Steer 

Rib Roast, per lb. .I21/2C, 15c 
Pot Roast, per lb . . 8c and 10c 

Lamb Stew, per lb . . • 6c 

Rib Boiling Beef, per lb . . 

5c and 6c 

Home Dressed Spring 

Chickens, per lb 20c 

Fresh Dressed Hens, per lb 18c 

Pork Roast, per lb. . • 15c 

Pork Chops, per lb 16c 

We have very good Sausages 
— try them. 



$1.10 



Want to Serve You 

It's a pleasure to feel that we are 
serving you satisfactorily. We ex- 
ert ourselves to do that. When 
you phone us a meat order, we im- 
mediately hunt out the best, do it 
up neatly and deliver it promptly. 
That policy makes plea.sed custom- 
ers, and we intend to continue it. 
CHOICEST MEATS 

Are always found here. Prices 
consistent with quality. 

Fresh .sliipnirnt of Soalshipt 
Oysters re<'eived daily. 

STIEGLER & CO., 

2- SECOXD AVEXUE 'WEST. 

Both nioiies 2239. 



PreMervlDK Fruitn are boIdk «ut 
of ttie marliet, aud at tiiene |irieet» 
are your lant eliance to make your 
Craitapple nnil Grape Jelly. Let um 
liave yonr order for them. 

Our Bread and 
Pastry 

Are made under the most sanitary 
conditions, and in the most cleanly 
manner possible, and we invite you 
into our kitchens at any time. 

ASK FOR 
HIAWATHA COFFEE 

and TEA, 
WITH YOUR ORDER. 



DULUTH 
PROVISION 
COMPANY 

17 FIRST AVENUE WEST. 

Extra Special Tomorrow 

Nice Little Pig Pork Koast lie 

Pork Chops l^c 

Best Sugar Cured Hanis 15c 

Legs of Lamb 12>4c 

Lamb Chops 12;4f and 15c 

Lamb Shoukier 10c 

Lamb Stew ©c 

l*ot Koast of Beef 8c 

Beef Steu ^ 

l^amily Steak 10c 

Prime Kib Koast. staudiiig or 

roIkHl 10c and 12 %v 

Round Steak 12 V^c 

Sirloin Steak 15c 

V eal Itoast 8e and 10c 

Chickens 1^ 

Ilome-Madc Sausage — 

Bologna 3 lbs for 25c 

Liver .Sau.sage S lbs for 25c 

.Sausage Meat 3 lbs for 2.5c 

Hamburger Steak. . . .3 lbs for 2.>c 
Frankforts 10c 



Delicious, Wholesome 

"Tteaey to Sertfe" 

PORK A.ND PCAS 

Sijc Generous Helpings 

Fifteen Cents ^-Oeryiufhere 

SATISFY YOURSELF— 
TASTE THEM HOT OR 
COLD— ALL OVER TOWN. 

STONE-ORDEAN-WEUS CO. Dto:ributers. 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OK WILL. 
State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis 

In Probate Court. 
In the matter of the estate of Ida Isa- 
bella Michaud. Decedent. 
A certain instrument purporting to 
be tlie last will and testament of Ida 
Isabella Michaud havins been pre- 
sented to this court and the petition of 
Arthur A. Mlcliaud being duly filed 
herein, representing, among other 
thlnKs, that said decedent, then beintc 
a resident of tlie county of St. Louis. 
.State of Minne.sota. died testate in the 
county of St. Louis. State of Minne- 
sota, on the 26th day of September. 
1909. and that said jietitioner l.s sou 
and praying that said instrument be 
allowed and admitted to probate as the 
last will and testament of said de- 
cedent, and that letters testamentary 
be issued to Alice E. Bulchart thereon. 

IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard before this court. at the 
Probate Court Rooms in the Court 
House in Duluth, in said County, on 
Monday the 8th day of November, 
1909. at ten o'clock. A. M., and all per- 
sons interested in said hearing and in 
said matter, are hereby cited and 
required at said time and place to 
show cause, if any there be. whv said 
petition should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this 
order be served by publication in the 
Duluth Evening Herald according to 
law and that a copy of this order be 
served on the County Treasurer of bt. 
Louis County not less than ten days 
prior to said day of hearing. 

Dated Duluth. Minn.. October <th. 
1909. 

By the court. ^ ^j^^^lECOFF. 

Judge of Probate. 
(.Seal Probate Court. St. Louis County. 

Minnesota.) 
F. C ELSTON. 

Attorney for Petitioner. 

501-503 Torrey building. . ,, ,, 
Duluth Evening Herald. Oct. 8. lo. zz, 

1909. 




Call for it: Phone for it! Wire for 

it: Cable: 
Get It. however, wherever you're 

able — , , 

But ALW^AYS be sure that this 

names on the label — 

"WHITE LOAF." 



"White Loai 

Baking Powder" 



It pays to take more trouble 
and get "White Loaf" Baking 
Powder. 

It pays in satisfaction and 
in RESULTS. 




There are more tha. 30,000 vessels 
in the world of 100 tons or more. 



THIS guaran- 
tee places 
all the risk 
onus. If you do 
not find Occi- 
dent Flour more 
satisfactory 
than any other, 
for •▼ery flour 
purpose, it costs 
you nothing. 



NOTICE TO^TRAGTORS 

Sealed proposals will be received by 
the Board of Education of the City of 
Duluth. at their office In the Central 
High School Building, up to noon (1- 
o clock) of Wednesday, October. 20th, 
1O09 for the construction of Ihe New 
Fairmount School Building, to be 
erected upon Lots 9 to IC inclusive. 
Block 22; and Lots 9 to 16 inclusive, 
Block 21, Gra.ssy Point Addition to Du- 
Unh. according to the plans sind speci- 
iiratlons prepared by W'. A. Hunt, Ar- 
chitect, 307 Lonsdale Bldg. 

A certified check for 5 per cent of 
the amount bid must accompany each 
proi>osa!, .said amount to be forfeited 
by the successful bidder in case he 
fails to enter into ( ontract, and fur- 
nish a bond, as required by law, with- 
in five days after award. 

Each bidder must state in his bid 
the date upon which he will have tlie 
building entirely completed. The con- 
tract is to provide for the comjiletlon 
of the building on the date specified, 
nnd In case the contractor falls to have 
the building completed on that date, he 
is to pay the Board the sum of twenty- 
five dollars ($25.00) for each day there- 
after until the building is completed. 
In case the building is compltted be- 
fore the date specified, the contractor 
is to be paid a .uemiuin of twenty- 
n've dollars (^'S-O") for t-ach day from 
the time the building is completed to 
the date specified. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids. 

Mark envelope "Bid — Fairmount 
School." and address same to the un- 
dersigned. ^^^^ ^ rkoNSON, 

Clerk Board of Education. 
Duluth Evening Herald. Oct. 14 and 16, 

1909. 



The price is a few cents higher— 
the quality is highest grade in the 
world — the difference shows in your 
baking. 

OrJer a trial tack from your croccf . He I* 
avthoriied to refund witiioDt artuBCBt the f nO 
par^aM price of any packafe of Ocadent whidl 
yon do M>t find satisfactoor. 

For Sale by All Grocer*. 

STONE-OROEAN-WELLS CO., 

Wholeiak Grocen. 

biiiiiiiiiiiuiniiiiiiiiiitiiiimiiinmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



1. F. NEFF 

302-.S04 AVeut Fourth St. 

Old phone I40S: new 297. 



Headquarters for 
PURE FOOD GOODS 

IN OIR GROCERY DEPT. 

A full line of fresh green vtge- 
tables and all kinds of fruits, 
IN OUR MEAT DEPT. 

Nothing but the best of meats. 
Saaerferaut and i«par*rHMi In »«e«i.on 
BOW. Freak Seal-Shlpt 0>»«toM 
every day. 



SHERIFFS r>XECUTION SALE — 

Under and bv virtue of an Execution 
issued out of and under the seal of the 
District Court of the State of Minne- 
sota In and for the Eleventh Judicial 
Distlict, and County of St. Louis, on 
the nth dav of October, 1909, upon a 
Judgment rendered and docketed in 
said Court and County in an action 
therein, wherein Wilfred Longtin was 
plaintiff and Henry Longtin was de- 
fendant, in favor of said plaintiff and 
against said Defendant Henry Longtin, 
for the sum of Five Hundred Tw^enty- 
two and 54-100 ($522.54) Dollars, which 
said execution has to me, as sheriff 
of said .St. Louis County, been duly 
directed and delivered. I have levied 
upon and will sell at public auction to 
the highest cash bidder, at the Sheriffs 
office in the District Court House, in 
the City of Duluth, Fifth avenue west 
and Second street, in said County of St. 
Louis on Saturday, the 27th day of 
November. 1909, at ten o'clock in ihe 
forenoon of that day. all the right, title 
and interest that the above named 
judgment debtor had in anrl to the real 
estate hereinafter de.'^cribed on the 
nth dav of October. 1909. that being 
the date of rendition of said judgment, 
or any interest therein which said 
judgment debtor may have since ihat 
day acquired. The description of the 
property being as follows, lo-wlt: 

Lots Eighteen (18) and Nineteen 
(19) Block Five (5), Plat of Alborn, 
St Louis County, Minnesota, together 
with all buildings situate thereon, ac- 
cording to the respective plats thereof 
on file and of record in the office of 
the Register of Deeds in and for St. 
Louis County, Minnesota. , ^ , ,. 

Dated Duluth, Minn., 11th of October. 

^*^^" WM. J. BATE.S. 

Sheriff St. Louis County. Minn. 
By F. L. MAG IE. 
Deputy. 
CRVSSWELLER & CRASSWELLER. 

Attorneys for Judgment Creditor. 
Duluth Evening Herald. Oct. 15, 22, 29, 
Nov. 5, 12 and 19, 1909. 



SAVE TIME! 

Telephone your want ad*, ta Tb* 
Herald. The rate* are the aaate, 
and tve will mail you a bill after 
Ita Insertion. 

BOTH 'PHONES, 324. 




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26 



THE DULUTH EVENING pERALD; FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 



FLAX DROPS FIVE CENTS 
AND WHEAT GOES HIGHER 



October and November Seed 

Have Slump in Local 

Market. 



Bullish News and Good Mill- 
ers' Demand Helps 
Wheat Prices. 



were 
wtek 



Duluth Board of Trade. Oct, 15. — 
Wheat went fractionally higher and 
the nearl.y tlax options dropped Sc in 
the Duljili market today. 

Wiieat was somewhat lrreKu!ar dur- 
ing the first hour, but became firm 
toward the end of the session on bull- 
ish Areeniine news and buying by ilie 
millers. 

Flax opened unchanged and was fair- 
ly steodv duriiiK tl-f fi'-'^t hour, but 
after tliat had a slump and closed 

Liverpool closed *4«Jil'fe<J higher, Ber- 
lin ^i.c higher and Budapest %c lower. 

The Modern Miller says: 

"Kain throughout the Southwest has 
enabled farmers to complete seeding 
of wheat, which dry weather has re- 
tarded. This secures tlie certainty ol a 
larger acreage than last year. The 
general conditions of the crop where 
up is excellent." . - , . 

Argentine shipments of wheat 
344 000 bu against 72.000 bu last 
and 1.6r.«,000 l>u a year ago. 

December wheat closed %4C higher 
in Duluth, 'ic higher in Chicago, 
^(fi 'fee higlier In Minneapolis. Ic high- 
er In New York and >>,c higlur in 
Winnipeg. Mav wlieat closed a+c liigh- 
er in Dulutli. •S.^i^c liiglier in Chi- 
cago "sc higher in Minneapolis, •'t.c 
higher in New York and unchanged 
in Winnipeg. ^ , ,,. , , 

l>tcember corn closed he higher and 
oats •■»fi>T:C higlier. 

Hroomhall caOled from Liverpool: 

"At the opening tlie wheat market 
was strong with values "«, d t i 1 ' » d 
higher, being influenced by the firm- 
ness iii American cables yesterday and 
the strength in spot for whicli there 
was an active demand. Manitoba of- 
ferings were lighter and Argentina 
futures were firm as a result of tlie 
apprehension felt regarding the locust 
reported appearing in wheat. l..ater 
in ttie morning, there was some easi- 
ness and values lost some of the early 
advance due to larger Pacific coast 
offers. Again toward midday. supp«'rt 
developed on good millers' demand and 
large flour sales and tlie n.arkei was 
titeady and values ^4 4f lUd higher tlian 
yesterday. 

"Corn was steadv at the opening ana 
unchanged to Ud higher and during 
the morning further gained Uli'^d on 
the strength in America, firmness of 
spot and an improved deiu.ind." 

Car receipts ot wheat at Duluth were 
4J'l atrainst ;M<» last year, and at Min- 
neapolis 245 against 4t;4 last year, mak- 
ing a total for the Nirthwest oi ^3h 
against !>04 last vear. Chicago received 
14 against G9 last year; Winnipeg re- 
ceived 41i* against 3^3 last year. 

iTimarv receipts of wheat were 1,- 
3i:>.0iH> bu. last year 1.454.0uo bu. t^liip- 
ments 1. 070. 000 bu, last year 475.000 bu. 
Clearances of wiieat and flour were 
35O.0<'O bu. 

Primary receipts of corn were 233.- 
COO bu, last vear 1'94.000 bu. Shipments 
:!43,O00 bu. last year leO.OOO bu. Clear- 
ances of corn were 4.0C0 bu. 

Wheat was active in the Du'u'h 
marnet. December wheat opened 'rj,c 
1 Igher at *1.04, eased off to $l.o3'- and 
closed there, a gain cf ^^c over yester- 
day. Mav uiieui opened -"^c higher, ai 



Barley. 1 car j| 

Barley. 1 car *° 

Barlev. 1 car ^tt^ 

Flax, 4 cars J-°° 

Flax. 1 car to arrive , 5Z,, 

Flax. 3 cars i'^i^ 

Flax. 600 bu to arrive ,5,^ 

Flav. 1 car J • f i f* 

Flax 1.830 bu to arrive ^"i^ 

Flax. 16,700 bu to arrive lo8 

Flax. 4.000 bu to arrive ^•**\.e 

Flax. 600 bu to arrive .. .••• 1-65 

Flax, 1.500 gu to arrive Nov. 30 1-68 

Flax. 1 car to arrive itl^ 

Flax i;.700 bu to arrive l.o(% 



country millers were eager buyers of 
the little offerings. No. 1 northern 
sold for 2%c above the December op- 
tion, and No. 2 northern for i^c above. 
Closing on track: No. 1 northern. 
$1.06%: to arrive. $1.06%: No. 2 north- 
ern, $1.04 •■?Kra 1.04%: to arrive, $1.03%: 
No. 3 wheat, $1.02 ^Vk (<i 1.03% ; No. 3 
wellow corn. 5'.>»4Ct59?i: No. 3 white 
oats, o7%(g3S'/6; No. 2 rye, 67%(& 

Millstuffs — Shipments. 1.589 tons. 
There was no change in the situation 
today. Demand continued strong, 
shipments heavy and prices firm. Bran 
in 100-pound sacks, $19.50. 

Some millers quoted higher flour 
prices today, but the majority Quoted 
the market unchanged. Domestic de- 
mand was very strong, and foreign In- 
quiry was fair. Shipments w?re heavy. 
86 165 bbls. First patents, $u.30@d.40. 
second patents. *5.10^:5.20: first clears. 
$4 45«4.65: second clears. ti.KXfi'S.ti). 

Flax — Receipts. 79 cars, against 80 
last vear; shipments, 19. Demand was 
strong for both spot and to arrive at -c 



ADVANCES 
rtOCKS 

Market Opened With Excited 
Trading in Steel at 
er Prices. 



THE M ARKETSAT A^GL ANCE. | 

Duluth December wheat closed %c higher. | 

Chicago December wheat closed VqC higher. 

Minneapolis December wheat closed %c to YsC higher. 

Liverpool wheat cables, %d to l%d higher. 

Duluth October wheat closed 5c lower. 

New York stocks, irregular. 

Boston copper stocks, firrn. 

Duluth copper stocks, active. 

Chicago live stock: Cattle, steady; hogs, lower. 



Flax. 
Flax. 
Flax. 
Flav, 



365 bu, 6 lbs 

1 car to arrive 

2.500 bu to arrive . . . 
11.000 bu to arrive. 



1.67^4 
1.671^ 
1 . 63 V4 
1.63 



THE THK AGO MARKET. 

Wheat Opens Fiiui and .Milling De- 
mand (lives Support. 

Chicago, Oct. 15.— Early 
grain and provisions 
shov.-ed a firm market in 
with a moderate range 
wheat 
heavy "•"^'''^•''"•" ''i"'"^"'! reinforced by 



business in 

here today 

all the pits. 

of prices, 

opening at an advance of %c 
vesterdaVs close. Continued 
milling "demand, reinforced 
an advance in Liverpool figures, gave 
support to the market. Decembei 
opened Uc over yesterday 
l.oG'i;. advanced %c and 
$1.06 v.. , . 

The market fell off for a short 
terval after tlie early trade and s"" 
i,ac to ^ic below yesterday s clos 
coverv was prompt, forced largely 
incrensed demand from Northwestern 
millers The market advanced steadily. 



at $1,061/4 rtf. 
steadied to 



in- 



, He- 
by 



touching l*^c 



above the 
December 



final figure: 
closing at 



eased off to $1.06 ><4. 



I. 



rallied 
a gain 



$1.07 

$1.0712 and closed at $1.0 

"4C over yesterday. 

Dirum wheat «losed ^sc higher. 

Flax was actively traded in. Octo- 
ber Hax opened unchanged at $168, 
which was the higli level of tlie day 
The price declined to $1.63 and closed 
there a loss of 5c from yesterday. 
Novtmber tlax opened unchanged at 
$1.6S. declined to $1-63 and closed 
there, a loss of 5c from yesterday. De- 
ceuiber tiax opened unchanged at $1.62, 
declined to $1.56, ralitea to $l.aS',4 
and closed at $1.58. a loss 
yesterday. Mav fiax opened 
at $1.65. declined to $1.59 >^ 
at $1.6014. a loss of 4I4C 
terday. 

Oats closed i^c higlier. 

Following are the closing prices:_ 

Wheat — No. 1 hard on track. $1.0i 
To arrive: No. 1 northern. $1.00 
:• northern, $1.04%. On track: No. 1 
northern. $1.06%; No. 2 northern, 
$1.04%; October^ $1.06: 



of yesterday, 
$1.07 (fi 1.071/8- 

In corn, anticipation of a large mo\e- 
ment of the new crop gave a l^fa>»sl» 
tinge to I he market, but the lighter 
receipts and the hedging ot shorts 
eoun*eracted the bearish tendency and 
held the pit firm. December showing a 
gain of «sc over yesterday on the.^P^"" 
ing at 58i.8'U5S%c, and s^yayed slightly 
up and dov.-n, steadying at oSi.jC. 
Fluctuations in corn were within a 
narrow ranee. December closed ^40 

^ Some^'cmniission house traders bol- 
•5-iercd up oats. December opened ^Ac 
higher at 39a, Ij 40c. 

Moderate receipts of live hogs gave 
the provisions market an upward 
ranging from iH^oc higher, 
arv products opened, pork. 
1!>:55; lard. $11 and ribs. $9. To 

Article* — Receipts bhipments 

Flour, bbls 2T.500 

Wheat, bu 44,40<i 

corn, bu 135-000 

Oats, bu 2.^0.200 

I>ye. bu b.OOO 

Biriey. bn -^.-^^'-T. 

Car lot receipts — W heat 14 
1 of contract grade: Corn. 81 
69 of contract grade: Oats. 
Total receipts of wiieat at 
Minneapolis and Duluth 
850 cars, compared with 



below the^ Duluth October option. Of- 
ferings were fairly , liberal. Close, 

$1.63*4. 

Barley — Receipts, 107 cars, year ago. 
70; sliipments, 92. There v/as a firmer 
tone to the market today. Demand 
was stronger for the malting grades 
at steadv prices, but the strong in- 
quiry for feeding barley made quota- 
tion.s firm to Ic higher than yesterday. 
Offerings were fairly liberal. Closing 
range. 49 (g 59c. 

> 
Liverpool Grain. 
UTerp(«^.l. Oct. 15.— Close: Wheat— Spot aulct : No. 
■> reil western winter nominal. 7s lOd: futur^-s steady; 
Dei-ember, "s llil: March, 7s 9%i<); May. 7s 9d. 
t'orn— Spot new .\merUan mixed. \U Calvestcn. 6s 
Id; futiir«s qultt; Octcber, 5s I'Sid; l>ccfml>tr, 3s 



Realizing Toward the Close 

Which Was Irregular 

and Feverish. 



Dniutb C-iir luMpeetlon. 

Wheat— No. 1 hard. 77 : -No. 1 northern 
2 northern. 9U; No. 3 sprinif. 35: No. 4 
No. 1 durum. 35: No. 2 dunini. 81: No. 
6; no grade durum. 1. Total of dunini. 14 
3. Total of all wheat. 4P1: last year. 340. 

Flax— No. 1. tiO. Total of flax. 6H: last year. 

('cm. 2; oats, 38; r>e. .'>; barley. 3('. 

Total of all cars, t);!J. fars on track today. 



l.fS: No. 

spring. 2; 

3 dunim. 

mixed. 

196. 



666. 




slant 
Janu- 
$lS.501r 



of 4c Irom 
loc higher 
and closed 
from yes- 



No 



December 
$1 04 »s; Mav. $1,071^. Durum on track: 
No 1 92^4c: No. 2. 89-4c: October dur- 
um' 92I4C; November durum. 92V.4C: 
December durum. 89Sc; May durum, 
9" lie Flax to arrive. $1.63; fiax on 
track, $1.63; October, $1.63: .Xovemler, 
$163; December, $1.58; May, $1.60'/.,. 
Oats to arrive, C7i2-38i'2c; oats on 
track, 37i/4-38i^c. Bye. 

Cars inspected: \\ neat. 
v«ar, 340: corn. 2: oats. 38; rye, 
lev. 30; Max, 69; iast year. 196. 

"Receipts; Wheat. »12.9 
14 109 bu: oat.-^, 47.260 bu 
3S9 bu; rve, 2.190 bu; fiax.. 

Shipments; Wheat, i69. 
324 bu; oats. 20,0OO bu: 



66-69C. Barley. 

491; last 
■ ; bar- 

lO bu: corn, 
barley, 45,- 
109.920 bu. 
!92 bu; corn, 
Hax, 1,601 bu. 



58,300 

45,200 

225.200 

259.600 

31,100 

cars, with 

cars, with 

113 cars. 

Chicago, 

today were 

904 cars last 

week and 873 cars the corresponding 

day a year ago. .1 «-« 

Clo«e- Wheat — December. $1.0. ly 

1 Oil's- Mav. $1.0714: July. y9^4c. Corn 

October 60i/ic; December, 59c; May, 

61'Nc: July. 60-fe<661c. Oats— Decem- 
ber^ 40V4C; May, 42Gc: July. 401hC. Potk 

October, $23: January, $18. 4o; -^lay, 

$lh.22%. Lard— October, ?l-'.17i^: No- 
vember. $11.80; January $10.9- Vs; 
Mav. $10.70. Ribs — October, $11. lo. 
January. $9.70; .May. $9.70 Rye— Cash. 
73r«74c: December. -.3c. Barley— Lash 
65c Timothv — October. $3.80 It 4.00, 
March. $4.20. Clover— Blank 

(^ash wheat— No. 2 red, $1.21#1.23. 
No 3 red. $1.16'fi 1.21 : No. 2 hard. 
$li-'({ill5: No. 3 hard. $1.08@1.11: No. 
1 northern. $1.08rci l.lo: NO. 2 norih«.rn. 
$1 06(ft 1.081-2 : No. 3 spring. $1.0a&1.08 
Corn — No 2. 61'ri61ir2C: No. 
■^f No. 2 yellow. 61 '4 1« 61 i-^c 



DEUTH 
WEREjHORT 

Many Local Traders Squeezed 

in Sensational Advance 

in Flax. 



New York, Oct. 15.— Fxc ting trad- 
ing in United States Steel was the fea- 
ture cf the market today ai the open- 
ing. A single 100-share lot was quoted 
at 9214, followed by simultaneous sales 
of 28,000 shares at 92^k and 92%, com- 
pared with 91 V4 last night. Denver & 
Rio Grande rose W. Pressed Steel Car 
li/fe. Union Pacific preferred. Cleveland, 
C. C. & St. Louis and Anaccmda 1. and 
St. Paul, Great Northern preferred. 
Rock Island, Norfolk & Western, New 
York Central. United Slates Steel pre- 
ferred, American Smelting and Central 
Leather large fractions. 

Realizing had only a triflin.g effect on 
values and there was a further ad- 
vance. The demand for stocks was 
varied, with the railroad group making 
the best exhibition of strength. Prices 
were shaded all around at 11 o clock. 
American Sugar gained 3%. Union Pa- 
cific 2, Reading 1%. Amalgamated Cop- 
per l-^ii. Consolidated Gas 1 14 and At- 
lantic Coast Line, Southtrn Pacihc. 
Colorado & Southeri>. Delaware & Hud- 
son, Denver & Rio Grandt preferred, 
Missouri Pacific. American Car. Great 
Northern Ore Certificates and Virginia- 
Carolina Chemical 1. 

The buying movement gathered force 
n and carried prices higher all 
around. Reading rose 2^8. Lnited 
States Steel 2'8, Rock Island preferred 
21/^. American Car preferred 1%, St. 
Paul and American Smelting li^ and a 
number of others a point or more. 
American Woolen declined 1. Prici-s 
showed the effects of realix ng at noon 
in reactions which ran to a point in 
some cases. Bonds were irregular. 

The market c'osed irregular and 
somewhat feveri.=!!i. Rock Island was 
pushed up 3 points, the preferred 3-"^, 
Kansas & Texas l%i and St. Louis 
Southwestern IVj- The dea Ings in th.e 
Rock Island issues were lieav.v. The 
market had to take a lot of realizing 
sales, which forced back Union Pacific, 
Reading and United States Steel a 
point. Prices came up again alter this 
realizing had been absorbed. but 
dropped somewhat in the late trading. 



ZEXITII 1104. DULUTH 1871. 

UEFERENCESj 

City Xntional Bank. 

Vlrmt National Bank. 

MARTIN ROSENDAHL 
& COMPANY. Inc. 

Capital $50,000.00. 

c:pper stock brokers. 

COMMERCIAL CLUB BUILDING, 

404 Wont Flrat Street. 

MEMBERS DULUTH STOCK EX- 
CHANGE. 



Our OTTU wires to the Copper 
couutrj. .\l«o eonueefiona to Ea«*- 
eru .Markets. 




agai 



FRIDAY, OCT. 15. 1000. 

Never iu yoar life have you bad a 
l»etler ebnuoe than now to make 
iiiiruey on tlie copperM. Look at 
Tizuliiniue ou Butte Hill making 
good; also look at Butte-Alex S^cott, 
located in the very heart o« the 
henrt of richest producer** iu the 
world. Big men are now heavily In- 
tereKted, and one of thene dayK >oii 
will wake up to I he fact that you 
were awleep while sharet* were Nell- 
lug at this low level. Only 100,000 
KhareN ixKucd and one of the best 
niiucM iu Kutte. Buy the Seott»* ou 
every little reaction. 

St. Mary's should be bought when- 
ever it reaetii a couple of cents. 
Vou will see this issue advance fast 
whfU good news eonies from the 
property, and it i« expected auy 
day. We have again seut our rep- 
resenfulive to Salt Lake City and 
lo the mine and will know In a few 
days jiiKt what the oouditions are at 
the proper<y. We are bullish on St. 
.Mary's, for every rcyort from Salt 
Lake is good on this oue. 

Twin Cities are hea\ y purehasem 
of the Calumet ifc Montana stock. 
We look for a big ad»anee in this 
issue. 

Tlie Ballaklava mine is proving 
to be a regular kouauxa on the 
1,400 level, and when returns are 
received from sliipments something 
Khoitid thru be doing in the market. 

We handle all kiuds of stocks and 
our ofliee is so located that you can 
get service at any time. 

Vou may not know it, but it is a 
fact that we are doing a very big 
business. We ba\e the Miller wire 
and our connections arc of the best 
all around. Look at our office — al- 
most on (he Duluth Stock Exchange 
floor! 

MARTIN ROSENDAHL. 



■New York stock 
by Plp";.. Jiihiibcn 

STOCKS— 



nuotatl ns 
ii Case. 



furnlsl ed The Herald 



I Open. I Hlglj-I Lew. | Cl< se. 



Allis CliaiiiKTS . 
AnialgamaU'il . . 
.\nieriiaii Sugar 
AnitrKun 
.\merlcaii 
AiiurK-au 
Anaconda 
.^tclilson 
ilo pfd 
H:;ltlinore 
Hn«.k!jii 



Car Foundry 

LcounioUve . . 

Cott-n Oil.. 



1.". 

81>/i 
134 

Bl) 
74 V4 
47^ 
122<A122U 
104 'A 



white. 
No. 3. 



3 yellow, 6ivic; No, 4. GOV*^ 



62c: 
61c: No 

Oa*t':s— No. 3 white. 40(5 41 %c: No. 4 
white, 39i?i40c; standard, 4Ua41M!C. 

Xew York Grain. 

New Yi;rk. <Kt. ir..— Cli.«ei December, $l.Io-*»; 
May, $1.13H- Cum— iKccmtitr. C'J^ic. 



.\nierloan Wheat 

Dulutli. .Miniii.ip<.li'5. 
Deienilier- 



MarketM. 

Chicago. New York. 



Cash .Sales Friday. 

hard wiieat, - cars '|-J!l,, 

hard. 1 car lOB's 

hard, 1 car ; JpeT* 

hard. l.St'O bu. to arrive.. l.OfeV* 



No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 northern wiieat. 
to arrive 

No. 1 northern, 2 cars.. 

No. 1 northern, 27,500 bu 

No 1 northern, 12 cars 

No. 1 northern. 12.000 bu. 
arrive 

No. 1 northern, 5,000 bu to ar- 
rive 

No. 1 northern. 3 cars 

No. 1 northern. 3,000 bu. to ar 

No. 1 noVtheVii. i.o'oo bu, io arriv 

1 nortliern, 19 cars 

2 northern wheat, 5 cars.... 
2 northern, 260 bu 30 lbs 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 2 northern. 1 

No. 2 northern, 

rive 

No. 2 northern, 2 cars 
No. 3 wheat. 2 cars 
Durum wheat, 

arrive 

cars No. 1 . . . 

cars No. 1 . . . 

.800 bu No. 1 

ear No. 1 . . . 

JOO bu No. 1 

car No. 1 

cars 

car 

car 

car 

car 



30,000 bu 

1.061^ 

1.05% 

to arrivel.OC 

1.06H 

to 
. l.OCVi 

1.05 "i 

1.06 V4 

1.07 
1.06% 
1.06 
1.04 Vz 
104 
car 1.03% 



Oren . . . 
High ... 
Low .... 
Close . . . 
Clo;e 14. 
May- 
Open . . . 
High . . . 

lAiW . . . . 

CI(.*e . . . 
Close 
St. 



14. 



04 
1.04H 

i.t>;^'» 

l.l»4»»b 

1.07 
1.07 ',2 
1.06U 
l.OTHb 
l.tGH 



1.04-'; 

1.04*i-Si 
1.0:; 34 
1.04^a 
l.OSH-H 



$1.0CH-'-a 
l.TT's 
l.(0'/» 
1.07-'ia 
I.li6»»-Vi 



$1.12'4 
1.13S 
1.12 ',4 
1.13'tb 

1.12>3 



07 »» 
o:»sa 



--% 



1.U6' 



Louis — 

IVK-erubcr 

May 

Kansiis City — 

Dc( tmlier 

Mi.y 

Winnipeg — 

I>W'embtr 

.May 

Cbicago 



Open 
lUgli 

IX)W . 

Close 



Clos 

...tl 
... 1 



i.reTi 

l.fl7% 
1.16 '3 

1.0714a 
i.nfii>i--i 

l.Mli. Close 

o'.'»4-H ... 
09>4-H ••• 



1.13% 

1.13V4-% 

1.124-% 

1.03%a 

1.13 

13th. 



.03H-% 
.04»4-% 



.9fi% 
l.oiH 



.%34 

l.Ol»» 



Oats, Corn 

Oat>. 
IHC. 

39% 

40% 

M'd 

40"« 



and Pork. 

<'<ni. 
Die. 
.■)8 

.■>!»'.« 
.->8 



Pork. 
Jan. 
$18.47 
18.47 
18.42 
18.45 



000 bu to ar- 



1 car No. 1 to 



3 
6 
3. 
1 



Durum. 
Durum, 
Durum, 
Durum. 
Durum, 
Durum, 
Durum. 
Durum, 
Durum, 
I>urum, 
r>urum, 
Bonde<l 

northern ..... 
Oats, 1 car No. 3 
Oats, 2,000 bu No. 
Oats. 1 car No. 2 
Kye. 288 bu 39 lbs 
Barley, 1 car 

1 

1 



to 
to 



arrive 
arrive 



1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



wiieat, 3 cars 



No. 1 



3 white. 

white 

No. 2 



Barley 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley, 

Barley. 



car . 
car . 
cars 
cara 
car . 
car . 
cars 



1.041/* 

1.04 »A 
1.03% 

.92 54 

.92% 

.92y4 

.92?4 

.92% 

.93 

.93 

.98% 

.90 

. 90 % 

.90 'A 

.88% 

1.00 
.36H 
.38 
.39 
.69 
.49% 
.56 
.53 
.55 
.54 
.50 
.51 
.46 



THE MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

Wheat Keeps Ip Stren^h in Spite 
of Expected Reaction. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Oct. 15.— The 
trade again today expected a reaction 
from the strong advances .made in 
wheat, but the market was still strong. 
New high points were reached 
Mav advanced to |l.o7% 



They Began Selling Short 

When Price Was 

$1.35. 



The recent sensational rise in flax 
prices has brought no joy to the Du- 
luth Board of Trade members. 

During the latter part of the sum- 
mer and this fall, tliere were many 
grain men who felt confident that 
llax prices were going down and not 
up this fall, arguing that the pre- 
cedent of last year was not going lo 
be maintained, willi a big crop m 

siglit. , ^ ^, ,j 

Following out this hunch, they sold 
October and November ilax short all 
through August and September. Wlien 
the crushing Interests began buying 
heavily, and no tlax was in sigiit, they 
were "forced to flee to cover, wiiich 
they did, greatly to their financial dis- 
tress. ^ , 1 , 

It is said that a number of local 
grain men dropped large sums of 
money in tlie squeezing of the shorts 
which has taken place since the recent 
rise began. . ... 1 

Although flax went off o cents today, 
the price is still above the level the 
shorts ever thought it would reach. 
Moreover, it has been higher than it 
was during most of the session today, 
and many of the sliorts were obliged to 
cover at the lop-notcli prices. 

The bearish hunch on flax was not 
the whim of a few. but the belie! of 
many, and the number caught in the 
squeeze is large. There was at least 
one pool formed to sell flax short 
at $1.35. 

Among the few people who came out 
of the bulge ahead of the game were 
the crusliers, whose activities in buy- 
ing the seed for their own uses w.as 
one of tlie principal causes for the ad- 
vance. 

* * « 

World's shipments of wheat tliis 
week are estimated at lO.OOO.UUO bu, 
exclusive of North America. 

* • • 
Broomhall's Argentine agent called: 

"The wheat crop is growing well but 
the appearance of locusts is causing 
much apprehension." 

. • ' 

^ew Vork .Money. 
New York, Oct. 15.— .M ney on call firm at 4V«@ 
4% per «nt; ruUng rate. 4% ptr «nt; closing l>id, 
4^ per cent; cffprtd at i% per rent. Time loans 
easier; «0 and SK* dajs and id.T luontlw. 4^ i>«r 
cent. Close: Prime mercantile paptr, 4\(<<j per cent; 
sterling exchange >teady with actual business in 
hauliers' bills at $4.82.85 for CO-day bills and at 
$4 86.".'> for dtraand; conimtrclal bills, $4.82',4('i 
4.81:%; l<ar silver, .'>0%c: Mexican d<,'llarv 43c; go*- 
eninient bonds steady; ralln.ad bonds liTeguUir. 



& Ohio 

Itapld Transit.. 

Central I.eather 

Clvrsapealte & (»hlo 

Chirago-(!t. West*ni lom. 

C, M. & St. roul 

Colorado Fuel & Iron.. 

Coll rado Scutheni 

Consolidated Has , 

Cona<Ua!i Pacific 

Delaware & Hud>(.ii 

Denver &. Klo tjfande... 

D.. S. S. & .\ 

Krie 

do 1*1 pfd 

»ir?at Northern 

Criat Northirn Ore 

Illinois Central 

InUr-.Met 

Iowa Central 

Kansas City Southirn .. 
Liuisville & Nashville... 

Mexican Ctntntl 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas 

.\U.s.,curi raciflc 

Natii nal I.eiid 

New Yi rli Central 

N<.rf.lk & Wtsleni 

Nor h Anitrlcan 

Northern Tat ific 

Ontario & Wtstem 

Pennsylvania 

People's Ga> 

Prosse<l Stetl Car 

Hepubllc Steel & Iron . . . 

do pfil 

lto< k Island 

do pfd 

iteadine 

.Sloss-ShelTield 

Soo Line 

Southern Itailway 

do pfil 

S iithern Pacific ' 

Tenncs.we Copper 

Cnirn Pacific 

Ctali Copper ... 
I'. .S. Steel .... 

do pfil 

Waliash 

do pfd 

Westlnghonse 

We t(rn fnion . . . 

Wisei n^iii Ctntral 



117 

78% 

80 H 

14Vi 

I.SOH 

4.»';» 

53 

143H 
186^4 
187 Vi 

46^ 

IJ 

34% 

49 
151% 

82 fe 
150 Vs 

16% 

29 

45 
152V4 

2:<% 



68 
88 V2 

1.3«\i 
97 
78 '/fe 

152% 
47% 

147% 

115 
48»4 
47 >4 

106% 
38 H 
76 

164% 
93% 

140V» 
30% 
60 

-130% 
3.-.% 

2C6 
47% 
91^e92% 

128% 
18% 
48% 
8C% 
79 
62% 



82% 
i:!4 

72 

60% 

74^i, 

48 
122% 
104 'A 
117% 

7!i% 

48% 

90 

14 'A 
461 '4 

4.-.% 

i4,^% 

187 

188 

48 

"34% 
8i 

ic% 

' '4; % 

13: 

2;:Ti 

6'.' 

8.S-<, 
13(.% 

97 

79 
151:% 

4K 

14«% 
11:.% 

4H% 

4;-% 

ioi;% 

4i 

7:) 
lfiti% 

91 
141 

3-.% 

1.31% 

.3*5% 

20<5% 

12«% 

lit 
48% 

79 " 

52% 



81% 
1:12% 

70% 

03 

74V4 

47% 
121% 
M4 
116% 

78% 

47% 

89 

14 
159% 

4J% 

14,3% 

187% 
46% 

34% 

i-iin 

82% 

"ie" 
"45" 

152% 

23% 

45% 

63 

88% 
135% 

96 % 

78% 
152% 

47% 
147% 
115 

47 -i 

47 
106% 

38% 

75% 
164% 

93% 
140% 

29% 

'i3.i% 
35% 

203% 

'91% 

1'28% 

18% 

48% 

"'-'s\ 

52% 



15 

81% 
13;l 

71% 
6 
74% 
47% 
122 

lot 

117 
78% 
47% 
89% 
14 

161 "1 
45% 
53 

14:h% 

187 
187% 

47% 

15 

:i4% 

49 

151 Ti 

83 
1.50% 

Iti 

29 

45% 
152% 

2:t% 
47% 
68% 
88% 

1,!G 
96% 
79 

15L'% 
47% 

148 

115% 
18 
47% 

100% 
41 
78% 

165% 
93% 

141 
30% 
69 

131 
38% 

201) % 
47% 
92% 

128% 
18% 
48% 
86% 
78% 
52% 



Mining. 

Oil". ■.!'.! 



Total Eharts. 1.180.000. 



MidT«-ay Horse l^larket. 

,\Unn(Sota Transfir. St. Pail. Alinn., Oct. 1.5. 
— Harrttt & Zinuncrinan rtpcrt: Sivei-ai big orders 
fir liggitig lioisf.s wire plaitd' today. sUipiiiiiits being 
made to Duhith. Viinliiia and liena. .Minn. A nuin- 
iKT of iiKiulries for nml«s aud horses fcr railroad 
work were rocelv-.d. Kcteipts Ughtir than any day 
durlnB the week. 

Draft'Ts. extra > 

Draflirs. ihcice 

Drafted, cunimon to good 

Farm mans and iiorses. extra 

Farm nums and hovics. clioice , 

Farm mares, ccauucn to good 

Delivery 

Driurs and saddltrs 

Mules, according to size 



Mass Gas 

Mexico Mining 

Miami Copper 

Micliigan 

Moliawk 

Nevada Consolidated 

Nevada Utah 

Newhouse 

Nipissing . . . 

North Butte 

Ojibway 

Old Dominion 

Osceola 

Parrot 

Pneumatic Service . . . 

Quincy 

Paven 

.^"anta Fe 

.Shannon 

Shoe Michigan 

Superior lioston .... 
Superior Copper .... 
Superior & Pittsburg 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

I'nited Copper 

United Fruit 
United States 
do pfd .... 
United States 

Utah Apex 

Utah Consolidated 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Wvandot 

Yukon Gold 

Arizona Micliigan.. 
American Saginaw. 
Begole 

Boston Ely 

Buttc-Alex Scott pt 
do full paid 

Butte & .Superior. . 
Cactus 

Calumet 
Calumet 

Calumet 
Carman 

Cliemung 

Cliff 

Copper Queen 

Chief Cons. . 

Cordova part 
do full paid 

Duluth & Moctezuma. 

Denn-Arizona 

Elenita 

Ely Cons 

Goldfield Cons 

Keating 

Lake Sup. & Sonora. 

Live Oak ■. . . . 

Mowitza 

National Exploration 

North Lake 

Ohio Copper 

Red Warrior 

Rawhide Coalition . 

Superior & Globe.... 

Sluittuck 

St. Mary's 

.San Antonio 

Savanna part paid... 

Tonopah-Nevada . . . . 

\\arren 

Wolverine & Arizona 

Yuma 

Zenith Lead 



pd. 



& Corhin... 

Senora 

& Montana. 



paid 



70% 

5 
1 5 14 

6>/^ 
60 
2334 

1% 

2% 
11% 
59V4 

8 

52 

159 

31 

87 
55c 

1% 
15"t 
69 

14»4 
59 
15 
67 
11 

9% 
162 
55% 
53 
37 

4»4 
43 
4 7 1/2 

3% 

714 
146 
2 1 4 
5 
SO 

■ ■ "2 ■ ■ 
1% 

4% 

S% 

2 3-16 

31,^ 

18 

11 
1% 
l',4 



88c 
1-16 
9-16 
3% 



$180 @ 240 
115(«170 
75 ("115 
145(gl85 
110C4140 
70(0 110 
135t''200 
140(nl95 
155^240 



and 



when 
Decem- 



ber to $1.04% !?« 1.0454. 
heavy selling at the 
made the prices lower 
became oversold and 
very strong, only '4c 



There was some 
opening, which 
but the market 
the close was 
below the high 



prices. Cables were stronger and the 
primary movement showed a slight 
falling off from a year ago. Local ele- 
vator stocks of wheat increased b2a.- 
000 bu for the week against 2.100.000 
bu last week. Minneapolis today re- 
ceived 345 cars of wheat as compared 
with 464 cars a year ago: Duluth 491 
cars against 340 cars and Winnipeg 
418 against 393. December opened at 
$1.04 ffi 1.04 «4: high. $1.04 %ry 1.04%: low. 
$103%: close, $1.04%. May opened at 
high, $1.^7%; low, $1.0C»4; close, 

Cash wheat was in 
today at higlier prices. 



ii;07:'l 
$1.07% 



strong demand 
Both local and 



The Cotton Market. 

New York, Oct. 15. — The cotton mar- 
ket opened steady at a decline of 6 
points on near months, which were in- 
fluenced by disappointing cables. Late 
positions showed an advance of 1 point 
due to reports of a severe etorm in 
the eastern and central belts. Realiz- 
ing was heavy, but there was strong 
bull support oh fears of storm damage, 
accompanied by rumors that Mr. Pat- 
ten was again buying and was coming 
here to look after his interests. The 
market during the middle of the morn- 
ing was firm, with prices about 3^7 
points net higher. 

Sp<it closed quiet. 5 points lower. 
Middling uplands, 13.90: middling gulf, 
14.15. Sales, 2.600 bales. Futures 
closed easy. Closing bids: October, 
13.55: November, 13.52; December. 13.61; 
January. 13.64: February. 13.67: March, 
13 74- April, 13.74; May. 13.78: June, 
13.72; .July, 13.68: .\ugust, 13.34; .Sep- 
tember, 12.45. 




(Established 1883) 



WIRE US YOUR ORDERS IO SELL 

1 ARRIVE ON BULGES 

C. C. WYM AN m. CO. 

Minneapolis Grain Oommiss'on Buluih 



Treasury Statement. 

Wa»hlng'iii. Oct. 15.— Tlie c. nditii n <f the treas- 
ury at tile beginning of business today waa as fol- 
lows: Trust fundf— Cold coins, $872,242.86.; sliver 
dollars. $487,155,000; biivtr dollars of 1890. $4,- 
045.000; s-llrer certificates outstanding, $487.155,1100. 
Otneral fund— Standard silv^'r dollars in general 
fund. $2.9(1.'^, -228; current liabilities, $109,917,081; 
woildng balance in treasury c.lTlees. $24.:i59.564 ; In 
l»anl;s to rreiHt tf treasurer ot United S'atrn. $19,- 
72;. 078; minor coins. $1,795,343. Total balance in 
geiural fund, $87,426,987. 



ChloasTo Livestock. 

Chicago. Oit. 15. — Cattle — Heeeipls estlin.",tcd at 4,- 
500; inarliet steady to 10c l<:wer; beeves, $4.10(«8.75; 
TeXiLS steers $4.00(n 5.7.); wcs'.en steers. $4.25(g7.50; 
stock»i-s and feeders. $:}.10C'45.25 : <ows and heifers, 
$2 10(n5.7il; calves, $7.00(n9.50. H< gs— Ueeelpts esti- 
mated at 13.000; markit ofllOe higiier; light. $7.i)0(^ 
7.70; mixed. $7.30(17.90; heavy. $:.'25(« 7.90; rough. 
$7-J5(n7 40; gold to choice heavy, $7.40^79.); pigs, 
$5.,50(n7.ii0; bulk of sales. $7.40(ei ; .80. Sheep— Ue- 
ceipts esUmaled at 18.000; market steaily; naUve. 
$240(n4.75: western. $2.65(n4.75; vearUngs.- $4.10® 
5.40; lambs, native. $4.25(«7.20; we.dern. $4.'25(a 



7V4 
54 

G% 
1 1-16 

1 

55c 
7»^ 
4% 
2% 

19c 

80c 

21 

3Cc 
8 

1% 
6'^ 



97c 
2 7-16 



701^ 
514 

15V4 
6% 

61 

24 

"3" 
sale 

591,2 
8»/i 
52 '/i 
160 

"9" 
89 

60c 
'1 

15% 
691/0 
15 

59 U 
15 1« 
69 

111-2 

9=v^ 



53% 
37% 

4% 
43 »4 
48 

4 

iso"" 

2V4 
5% 

85 
3% 
2V4 
1% 
434 
9>4 
2 5-16 
3% 

25 

111/4 
1?4 
1% 

\1Vz 
2 

90c 
1 9-16 
1% 
4 

9'i 
4% 
8 

58 
6% 

IVs 
60c 
7?4 
1% 
56c 
sale 
414 
2% 
20c 
90c 
22% 
40c 

■) 
7 

3% 
1 



THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 



a 
but 



barrel. Tlie 
the rest of 



176's 
96 s 



216's 

IJO's 



.15. 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following are the closing quota- 
tions of copper stocks at Boston today, 
reported by Paine, Webber & Co., 
316 West Super ior street: 

I Bid. I Asked. 



STOCKS — 



Copper. 



Telephone 
Zinc 



Scnth St. I'aiil Uvextork. 

S uth St. I'aui. Minn., Oct. 15 — ( Mttie— Kec-e!pts. 
9C0: market sle.ady and unchanged. Krgs — Reccdpfs, 
2.000; market steady lo 5c higher; range. $6.90*i7.55. 
siieep— heceipls. 13.000; market ileadj aiid unchanged; 
lambs tuicbanged. 



Amalgamated 
Anaconda . . . 
Adventure . . 
Ahmeek .... 
Allouez . 
American 
•American 

Atlantic 

Arcadian 

Arizona-Commercial 

Boston Cons 

Bostcm-Corbin .... 
Black Mountain . . • 
Butte Coaiition . . • 
Butte & Londtm... 
Calumet & Arizona 
Calumet & Hecla.. 

Centennial •. 

Cons. Mcrcur 

Copper Range . . . . 
Cumberland-Ely .. 

Daly- West 

Davis-Daly 

East Butte 

Franklin 

First National . . . . 

Giroux 

Granby 

Greene-Cananea . . 

Hancock 

Helvetia 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw 

Lake Copper 

La Salle 

Mass Cons 



82% 


821/4 


47% 




5% 


5% 




230 


59 


60 


142^4 


142% 


33% 


34 




12 


4% 


5 


44% 


44% 


14% 


14% 


20 


20% 


65c 


80c 


24% 


25% 


23c 


25c 


98 


100 


650 




39% 


40 


15c 


20c 


79% 


80 


7% 


7% 


5 3-16 


5% 


8 


8% 


11 'A 


1 11% 


16% 


16% 


6% 


6% 


s% 


9 


95 


96 


10% 


10% 


11 


11% 


6% 


6% 


25% 


26 


2% 




36% 


37 


■St 


15 


6% 



10 

00 



3.73 
4.00 
1.60 

.65 
1.90 

1.50 

.18 

3.75 



earli. 



1 lb-prints 

1-lb jars 

10-Ib tubs 

tubs 

creamery. 60-lb 
size package... 



•ubs. 



DUL UTH COPPER STOCK MARKET 

H.SlilTCHELL^ 

IICMDERS DL'LUTH STOCK EXCHANGE 

202-204 Manhattan Building 




Private Wlrea. 
City 'pbone 180S. 



REFERENCES: 

City Xatlonal Bank, 
Dulutb, .Minn. 



Private tonjc "'■♦■■J* 
'Pbonea 1657-180.. 




Mo W. LEE & COMFAf^Y 

INCORPORATBin, 
Paid op Capital. «80,000. R^-oarceii Over t::50.OOO. 

BANKERS AND BRGKEBS 

Private Wires to Iron Range, Copper Country, and ail Stock 
Exchanges, both East and West. 

MoU, Pho-r. 20»3 4« W. superior St.. nulath. Mloa. 




LEWIS H. MERRITT 



LEWIS H. MERRITT & CO., Brokers' 



PRIVATE WIRES TO ALL MARKETS. 

104 PR.OVII>SNCB BVILrDINO. 

ZENITH, TOT. DULVTH, 12S». 



LEE W. FARMER, 

BROKER. 

LISTED AND CURB MINING 

STOCKS. 

410 I.oa»4ale BalMlBS. 

Zenith phen* 483. Bell pbon* 432. 




0. A. HOFFMANN, 

BROKER, 
637 Maaliattaa Ultlx.. 

Cnrb Mining Slocfes a SpcdaHy 

Corrc»i»oadeBC« Sollclte*. ^ 

Duluth, thi2. Z«'nlth. ♦«. ; 




ROOM 



Dotb 



Pbnaes 14K6. 
PHOKMX BLOCK. 



J. H. ROBBERS, 

Copper stocks and Bonds 

Carb Stock* a Specialt/. 
LUtCd Securities. 



sacks 07 V4 

pail 

Pkg.) 



Ro.-istetl peanuts, 100-lb 
S.\LTt;U PEANUTS— 
SiiUetl peanuts, .SO-lb palls pe 
Siiltetl peanuts, 10-lb boxts, pei biix.. 
(.Meusurliiii «{Uss lucludeU in eacli 
HOXICY— 

Fancy Wisconsin white clover, per lb 

CIUEIl— 

Apple cider, clarified, per )»-< 

Kr.iit cidtr, per iti-gal. keg 

JJiackberry cider, per keg 

Kaspberry cider, ptr kig 

Cherry cider, per keg 

IHiV coitx— 

Snowball pop com, 40-pkg. box 

Pill) corn, tn tlie cob t 

Pop corn, shelled 

POTAT()I':S— 

New potHtoe.s, per bu 

O.MONS— 

louM unions, per sack 

Kentucky onions, per sack 

tJllKKN VtGETAl51,i;S— 

Bean.s. srcen, per hunipir 

Beans, wax. per bu 

Meets, dozen 

Carrots, per dozen 

Cauliflower, per bu 

Celery, pe r doiSien 

Com, pe r sack 

Dill encumber:!, per bu 

Cucumbei-s. Ki.rden, ptr bu 

Meelium cucumber?, per bu 

Kffcplanf. pir dozen 

Head lettuce, per bu 

Lettuce, per bu 

Mint, per dozen 

Piir>'e.v, per tozen 

P( ppe rs, per bu 

P«.as, per bu 

Pieplant, home, per box 

Kadislicj, round, per dozen 

VKUETABLKS— 

New .Mliiuesota cabbage, medium crafw.. 

B.-.Ras. pt r bu 

Beets, per bu 

'l\irnlps. per bu 

Carrots, per bu 

i;arllc. per lb 

Horse radish, i)er lb 

Horse radl<h, per barrel 

Pumpkins, per dozen 

Squasli. per dozen 

UKKSSKU POCLTUY— 

Si rings, per lb 18 

Hens, per lb 16 

Tiirkc.vs, peT lb 20 

Ueese, per lb 14 

liucks. per lb 17 

FISH— 

PiUc. per lb 10 

Percli, per ib 7 

Fnsh salmon, per lb 11 

I'ickerel. per ib 7 

Wlilte, per lb 11 

Frtsh lake trout, per lb 10 

Herring, per lb 3 

HAY— 

Tiiiiotliy. per ton 12 .IO 

Uplands. No. 1, per ton 11 50 

FKKD— 



With our o\Tn private wlr« 
connections with New York. 
Boflton and the copper conn- 
triea of Michigan. Montana. 
Xevatla, Utnl). Arizona and 
Jlfexloo, tre are t!ic l)r*t e-quip- 
ped to q\\ti yon quick exccit* 
tlona on nil the U^adln;: local 
•tock.s of any brckeraac house 
in the dty. 

PAINE. WEBBER & CO., 

SI6 WEST SCPKRIOIl ST. 
Torrey Uulltliox. 



1. McOALLUI^, 

broke: s%. 

Member of Dulutb Stock Kxcbangre, 
112 .Maahaltan Dulltliug. 

Old 'PboDo, U34. ZcDitb, 48S. 



3.25 
1.25 



.16 



25 

2.25 
.03 
.04 

.45 

1.35 



.80 

.80 

.20 

.20 

1.25 

.50 

.75 

l.OJ 

.05 

1.25 

1..^0 

.75 

.50 

.40 

.25 

1..-.0 

1.10 

.85 

.20 



nue saloon keeper, was aceiuitted on 
an as.«ault and battery charge when 
arraigned in municipal court. 

Walter .Smith, held on an assault 
and battery chartre, pleaded not guilty 
and ^vill be tried <;>tt. 19. 



Will Soon Let Contract. 

The contract fsr a part of the new 
$65,000 normal .«--chool dormitory for 
women will be let on Oct. 28, accord- 
ing to the present intentions of those 
who have the matter in charge. It 
will be 9 7 by 60 feet and will have 
three stories and a basement. It is 
planned to put up the basement this 
fall and begin work on the upper 
stories next spring. The building 
will stand on a triangular piece of 
ground ju.'-t acro.'^s Grand avenue from 
the school. 



.35 
.00 
.00 
.60 
.75 
.12 
.14 
.00 
.50 
.50 



@ 



12 



loci.l market and i;re selliig at $ 
bi:nana market is a little easier, 
the li?t is aLiiut uncl!ang<d. 

cAi.ioKMA Fiiurrs— 

Peaches, per box $1. 

Bartlett pe'ar^, per box - 3. 

OUANGKS— 
Fancy California valcnclas. 
Fancy Califi mia vaiencias 
Italian pmnes. per crate 

TO.MAlX>i;S— 

Faniy tomatoes, 4-basket crates 

Fall! y ti'niatoes, bu 

(iltAPKS— 
Muscat. Callfoniia. 4-basket crates.. 
Concord grapes, per Uisket 

CItAPK FllUIT— 
Fancy Callfcniia, any size 

APPiJ-:s— 

Choice new apples 

LKMON.S— 

Lenions, fancy 

Limes. i>er box 

BANANAS— 
Uatianas. per lb 

WATK.KMKLONS— 
Fancy Missouri melons, 

CANT1-.LOIPKS— 
Callfonda, standards, per crate. 

COCOANUTS- 

Coccanuts. per sack 

Co€ oaiuits. per dozen 

CUANBKItltlKS— 
Cranlierrles. per bbl 

BITTKU- 
Fancy creamery. 
Fancy irian!er>', 
F'ancy ereamery. 
Creamery. GO-lb 
Hand separator 
Fresh dairy, any 

CHElISi:- 

Fancy full cream twins 

Block Swiss, per lb. No. i 

Full cream brick clicese. per lb 

Primost cheese, per lb 

Wheel Swiss, per lb 

I.imluirger 

IHIOS— „.^ 

Strictly fresh candled egg» 24® 

Flos AND DATES— 
Comet tigs, 80 packages to case, per case... 

Callfoniiii figs, 10-lb box 

Imported figs, 6crcwn, 25-lb box 

Imported figs, 100-lb boxes 

Fard dates. 12-lb boxes, per box 

Sugared walnut dates, 10-ib boxes, box.. 
Fard dates, lib packages. 30 Its to case. 
Halloween dates, 70-lb boxes bex 

N UTS- 
Walnuts. No. 1. soft shell, sack, per lb... 

Imported French walnuts, per Ib 

Filberts, per lb 

Bra/Jis. per lb, large 

Pecans 

Almonds, Taragonas. per lb 
C.'.Ufoml.t almcuds, S. S... 

Mixed nuts 

PEANUTS— 

Belle of Duluth. per lb O*'* 

Ituustcel peanuts, j>«r lb. ....«• « •••• •''• 



.2.75® 4.25 

6.50 

1.25 

03^ 

30 

2.00 



4.25 
.60 

7.00 

.31 

.31 
.31 
.30 
.25 
.24 

.leii 
. 19 
.18 
.06 
.18 
.17 

.25 

7.00 

.75 

.12 

.14 

1.25 

1.25 

2.25 

4.50 

.14 
.14 
.13 
.12 
.14 
.16 
.15 
.12 



Sh rts. i>e'r ton. 
Bran, per ton. . 
Oats, per bU.. 

MEATS— 
lUef. per lb. . . 
Mutton. t»er lb. 
Perk liins. per 
Veal, per lb. . . . 
Lamb:!, per lb. . 
Lard, per lb... 



22 50 

22 5D 
42 



Talk Over iiood Roads. 

The recently appointed state legis- 
lative committee on roads was in .Su- 
perior yesterday, and held a joint 
conference with the Commercial club 
last evening. "The real object of our 
travels," said the chairman of the 
committee la.-t evening, "is to lind out 
the best manner in which to give state 
aid to the establishment of good roads 
tlirough the state." 
c 

Will Coaie i.i on Train. 

Itasca children attending the Nelson 
Dewey high ^^chool at the East end 
will not have to walk a mile and a 
half to the street car terminus at 
AUouez in order to get to school every 
morning. The .Superior Commercial 
club has arranged with the Omaha 
road to slop the morning train at 
Itasca every morning, giving them an 
opportunity to come to the East end 
on the train. 



lb. 



5H@ 

8 @ 
Wit® 
8 @ 

13% 



lOli 

9 

15 

10 

UV-i 



C'lilcasTo. 

Chicago. Oct. 13. — Butter— Market steady: <rfa:u- 
erie:*. St'c; elairie.'. 26c. Eggs — Market stejidy: re- 
ceipts, 8.141 cases: at mark. ca«es included, 18c: 
firsts. 23c: prime flrstn. 25c. Cheesi>— .Market finn; 
daisies. 16(aIl>Vic; twins, 15(3 10c; young Americas, 
16felOV4c: long horns. 16(rtl6'.4c. Potatoes- Mar- 
ket steady: choil-e to faniy. 4fifn48c: fair to go<,d, 
42ta43c. Poultry— Market steady; turkeys. lJf(flCc: 
chickens. 12>,»c: springs. i:!c. Veal- Market steady; 
50 to 60-pound welglits. OfeOVic; 00 tj 85-pouiid 
weights, SVitelOc; 85 to 110-pound weights, 10^4 
<al2c. 



Xew York. 

New York. Oct. ]5.—Butter— Market firmer; re- 
ceipts. 6,683 packages; e-reamcry extras. 3:i^ic; thinl 
to firsts. 26&2!*'/5C. Cheese— Market steady and un- 
cl:a!igeel: receipts, 1.910 boxes. Eggs— .Market flr.nier; 
TKeiptB, 11,204 cases; state Pennsylvania and near- 
by hennery white fancy. 28is.42c: same, gathered 
white. 28,'<i37c; same, brown hennery. 33e^35c; same, 
gathered brown. 27^.120; western extra firsts, 26>4(s) 
27 '/ic; storage, prime to fair. 24(n25Hc. 




12H@ 



Dedication Banquet. 

Nenrly .'JOO Masons of Superior and 
Duluth attended the banquet, which 
v»as held last evening at Superior in 
connection with the formal opening of 
the new Masonic temple at Hughitt 
avenue and Belknap street. 

J. French was toastmaster. Mayor 
Crum.pton gave an address of welcome 
to the visiting Masons. Among the 
speakers were: Past Grand Master J. 
K. Durgin. Clarence 
Perry. Senator G. B 
Denfeld. A. C. Volk, 
M. J. Murray. 

This evening the 
concluded by an informal recept 
for Masons and their families. 

In Municipal Court. 

Ambrose Collins, arrested Wednes- 
day night on a charge of housebreak- 
ing, when arraigned in municipal 
court yesterday, pleaded not guilty. 
He will be heard in his own defense, 
Oct. 19. 

Frank Spoodis, a lower Tower ave- 



B. Miller, W. W. 

Hudnall, Robert 

A. J. Wright and 



exercises will 



be 
on 



*mm^ 






AUAlvO-N'K FISHI.NG. 

Wide World .Magazine: Tlie Chinese^ 
and Japanese along the coast of 
California obtain the abalone in the 
only practicable way — by diving for 
tlie-m. The diver ^rle!^ tlie animals 
from the rocks with an iron bar, and 
places them in a rone basket, which is 
hauled up to the .'^urface by men in the 
boat atttndin'fe him. \ diver will re- 
main under the wat^f. sometimes at a 
depth of more than 100 feti-t, for 
five hours unless dovil-fi.slt attack him. 
^hut off his supply of air, or other- 
wise stop him from working.* If the 
diver Is .<~eized by a de vil-flsh, liis com- 
I. anions liaul hi.Ti v-.> and cut off the 
tentacles tif the powtiful creature wita 
hatchets. Seveial years ago two 
Ciiinainen were .searching in a boat 
for al>alones off Cypress Point, in the 
bay of .Monterey. The man at the oars 
tried to kerep the bout steadv while 
his companion pried a large abalone 
frc.m tlie rocks and reached down to 
seize it. The abalone closed upon the 
man's hand and held him so that he 
was drowned. Tlie oarsman was 
throv.n out of the boat by a wave, but 
swam ashore. Some hours later the 
body of tli<» drowned man was rescued 
with great danger and difficulty by 
his countrymen. 

The abalones are brought ashore In 
boats aitd spread out In a sunny place 
to dry. the process reducing their bulk 
greatly and rendering their flesh 
tough and horny. Great quaittities of 
dried abalones are sent to the Orient, 
where the people soak and stew them, 
or grind them to powder and make 
soup. This is the simplest and crudest 
method of preparation. Some Japan- 
ese cut t^i' flesh from the shell while 
the abalone is still alive, boil it and 
pack it in cans in the same manner as 
oysters. This method is quicker and 
better than sun-drying, but yields a 
tou.Th product. 

m 

TREKKI.NCx TO CANADA. 

The ebb and flow of immigration 
across the Atlantic has borne a very 
close relation to the labor tnarket, 
says the Canadian Magazine, but the 
great trek of the sons of men — across 
tlie international boundary, from the 
United States into Canada — is the re- 
sult of the desire of oivners of land to 
become the owners of more and better 
land. 

The inrush of 80.000 settlers last 
vear from the United States to form 
"part of those who now occupy 5,000,000 
of the 175,000,000 acres of virgin soil 
that is to be cultivated is one of the 
most dramatic artl spectacular events 
in the history of modern times. 

Because of the great demands fot 
relief from the lack of work and over 
population It is estimated that this 
country will witness a migratory 
movement of Europeans such as has 
never bten seen in modern times. 

In 1800 the population of Europe was 
approximately 200.000,000. In 100 

years it had increased to 400.000,000 
during a time in which the population 
of all the rest of the world had In- 
creased by only 100,000.000 souls. From 
1900 up to the present time, it Is said, 
the increase in pojiulailon of Europe 
has been much more rapid even than in« 
the years immediately preceding that 
date. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 


; 




1 1 






rr 



■^r- 



-C-^ 



t 



T»> 



■i 
r 







1 

1 




1 

1 

t 

i 




1 










- T" 



■r*- 



-r*- 



"^ 



f: 



-^^. 




I 



■• 



THE DULUTH' EVENING HERALbr FRKDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1909. 




FOR SALE 

f3,SOO — Kight-poom modern home. 
)>fith. .^fone foundation, hanlwooil 
finish downstair.s and floor 
throughout; hot water; corner lot 
r)'>xl4<); Forty-fifth avenue east. 

^00»— Kight-room modern hovwe. 
hath, electric light and ga.s; hard- 
wood floors throughout, flue re- 
ception hall with grate; lot 50.\ 
]it-i I>»8ter Park. 

•2.100 — Six-room house, city water 
an.l gas In the street, one block 
from the car line. Lot 50x150; 
West Fifth street, near Eighth 
avenue. 

CHA.S. P. CRAIG Ok CO. 

.^01 ta 50R SflUyood Bids. 

WE U'RITK I.\SI:RA.\CE IN 

Al fOMTANIKS. 



liODTIOIJIIL 



lUlLROAD TIME TABLES. 

DILIITH, MISSABE & NORTHERN 
R41LWAY 



Of flee 



420 A\>fl1 

'PhOB«, 



Superior St. 
WW. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

WANTKD— PL'FILS IN SHORTHAND 
and tvpewriting: private instiuc- 
tloii.s; eighth grade graduate. Ad- 
dres.s I> 173. Herald. 

TYPKWRITING. STENOGItAHHY AND 

cop> ing. Lenox hotel notary. 



M. J. Traiiah. wUh Ileminglon Type- 
writer company. Commercial build- 
ing. Old phone 23'>: new 'plione 181. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 



KF.MOVED ON 
Barrett, 1117 



SHORT NOTICE— DICK 
E. 4th St. Zen. 1945-Y. 



Lctve. 






I AnU*. 
Hlbbtns. Vlr<tnU. Ereletb. ) | 
•7.40 \m) < C<lerjliu'. |Moaii»«iu Irjii. )■ ] *3.2I »• 

•3.50 iiml Htobltig. VltginU. KveUtU. |>I0.3I am 

tColiTaln>!. 
f Vinlnla. Cook. Kanler. Fort 
•7.10 fin; ■( Kranci-i. Port Arthur. Ban- H •7.31a" 
I t. (lette. Warroad. Winnipeg- j i 



ortl 

HI- }] ^7.31 



•OaliJ tDJll7 except Suudaj. 

Cafe, Observation Car. Mesaba Range 
Potnt.s. Solid Vestlbuled Train. Modern 
Sleeper through to Winnipeg. 



THE DULUTH ft IRON RANGE 
ROAD COMPANY 

"THE VER.MIL10N ROUTE 



RAIL- 



rf:movi:i» — merrill. i 

road. New. U'iX-.X.; Old. 



^09 LONDON 
1.390-K. 



HELP WANTED— MALE. 
(Continued.) 




WANTED— YOUNG MEN. * 

If vou desire a good military * 
training which will teach discip- * 
line and cost you nothing, we ^ 
have room for five young men in ,(■ 
the National Guard. Only young >^ 
men of good character need ap- >r 
plv. Complete uniforms. guns. ■* 
overcoats and other equipment i(- 
furnished. Apply Armory. Thurs- * 
day evening at 8 o'clock. Ask for * 
Capt. Miser. *• 



»»»»»»^'-»^P-»»»»^-^»^^»»^-^'»*'»» 



PICTURE FRAMING. 

<;r.«^T.\VE henneckeTTu'e. sup. st. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 



Zimmerman & M.than — 
mechanical dra vlngs. 



Tracings and 
Zen. 137fi-D. 



SAFES. 

SAFES— NEW AND SECOND HAND. 
Safes opened, repaired and combina- 
tions changed. Christie Lithograph 
company, telephone 262. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED isTEAM- 
titter at once. E. S. Farrell company 
24 West First street. 



WANTED- 
luth Van 



B.\GGAGE 
& Storage 



DRIVER, 
company. 



DU- 



WANTED. 



Bov over Ifi years of age to de- 
liver parcels, run errands and 
make himself generally useful; 
must be of neat appearance. Ap- 
ply at 



J. M. GIDDING COMPANY. 



-V 



SALE -iMISCELLANEOUS. 

FOlT'^A^^^^^^i^OlA^Jsi^^ CHEAP; 

at once. IQiafgast Sixth .street. 



FOR SALE. CI 
family launcj 
polished b* 

power engine 
good running 
account 
at once. 



[ ]•: A P— T W; E N'T Y - FOOT 
,full eqtiipment, all 



siT fittingsi, 7-horse 

I everse goar; all in 

order. Only selling on 

of moving; will demonstrate 

Address B 335. Merald. 



FOR HALE- 
CASH REGISTERS. 
We manufacture a cash regi.ster 
every two miniJtes. Liberal allow- 
ance for exchange of registers. 
Call and see our J 909 models. 
THE NATION'AL CASH REGISTER 
COMPANY. 
E. W. Rus.sell. .Sales Agent. 
425 West Superior street. 
Zenith, 817. Bell. 2585. 



-ROOMS. 



FOR RENT — NICELY 
room in private family, 
avenue east. 



FURNISHED] 
122 Seventh 



FOR RENT— VERY LARGE FUR- 
nished room; housekeeping P^'v- 
ileges; modern and reasonable. 130 
West Third street. 



KOK RENT — LARGE FURNISHEU 
room; light housekeeping allowed 
modern and reasonable. 
Third street. 



130 West 



Le.uo 



DUI.UTH. 



AiriTs. 



Ti 



KiUfo Rl»er, Two U»r- 

• 7.30 a*; ' born. Tjwer. Kly, Aurora. 

• ).lt pail 1 klwabiK MrKlnley. SparM, 
t7.43 am] i Eveleth and 

I !_ Vliilnla. 



w. 



12.00 m 

•6.30 pm 

ti.45 pn 



•Daily except Sundw. t*»'«l»» °'^- 



WATCHES REPAIRED. 

Guaranteed Main Sprin£?s, $1.00; watch 
cleaned. $1. Garon Bros., 213 W. 1st. 



FOR SALE— COWS. 



FOR S.\LE- 
cows. Call 



-TWO (JOOD FAMILY 
at 315 J<ortli Fifty-ninth 



avenue west. 



Dalntb & Northern Minnesota Railway 

Offices, 510 LoHsdale Bids., Dulutta. 

Trains leave Knife River, 20 miles 
rut on the D. & I. R. R. everj' day, 

Jlundays excepted, on arrival of the. train 
saving Union station, Duluth. at 7:30 
a, m. Returning conneciionn are made 
at Knife River with trains due In Du- 
liil> Liloa station al tJ iU p. m. Coiuiuotjona are 
rwde At BaptUm Hirer with itaga line for Grand i 
Marals «cd all North 3h re potaU when jperatin* 



ARTKLES OF INCORPORATION 

— OF— 
THOMAS FEKiH LWD COMP.\NY 



WANTED— TVVENTY'-FIVE .MEN FOR 
Southern Minnesota, near lovva. Big 
street paving contract. Laborers 
J2.2& per day. First class brick 
pavers $5 per day; board |3.50 per 
week. Company work, free fare. 
National FJmployment company, 5 
South Fifth avenue west. 



F(R. SALE— 1115 TAKES FISCHER UP- 
1 Iglit pianu; one Oliver, one Reming- 
ton typewriter cheap. Room 15 Phoe- 
nix block. 



FOR SALE — GAS RANGE JEWELL 
make, four holes, ovens and etc. J. 
D. Stryker, telephone 16i>. 



!■ Oi: RENT— TWO FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping. 702 \\ e»t 
Second street 



FOR F:ENT — W ELL FURNISHHD 
room, suitable for one or two; gen- 
tlemen preferred; Ninth avenue east 
and Fir.st street. Call suite o. oH 
West F irst street. 

FOR RENT— FIVE ROO.\I>. WITH ALL 
conveniences, at iau6 West I'ourtii 
street; rent. J20. 




I-OR RENT— FOUR ROO.MS. ON PITTS- 
burg avenue; water, sewer, gas. elec- 
tric light, hardwood floor. Call iien- 
ith 'wlii-ne 227T-A. 



FOR SALE— WOOD AND POLE SAW 
rig; also, 2Vs-lo''se pow«r gas en- 
gine; $58.50. Call Dulutli Gas En- 
gine works. 



^*?^>i'-***^#SJ-/r.*'V\i-«:^^:¥-******'**^ 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 



Laara 

•-I.9C am' 
• 8-00 am 
•7.30 pm'. 
•a.lS am 



Aihland and Ea*'. 

Ashland itiid Kaat . . . . 

.MUiD. ind I>akata Expraia. 
North Ci.Mt Limited 



ft (M ami 

^1.53 pm 

•II )0 pmj 



Duluth Short Una.' 

ST. PAUL 
MINNEAPOLIS 



Artl»e. 
•11.15 am 
•6.40 pm 
•8.IS am 
•8.2S pm 



Arrive. 
•S.30 am 
t2.0S pm 
•7.00 pm 



*l>ail) 
Deout and 



tUalljr txctpt Sunday. "Phone. 214. Uulm^ 
334 W««t eupcrlur itrtet. 



fiJia CTH-WkSTERNT iNE 

Ul-lc.cV.KM.a. 6.t«Y.lit=_ 



Boy for 
between 



WANTED 

packing room; 

the age of 15 to 

Applv at 

FRELMUTH'3. 



must be 
li years. 



**^^-?\<«#«iNI*«#«ie##^M--:%-*f***f*i* 



FOR SALE— OLIVER TYPEWRITER; 
good as new. 313 West Superior St. 

"^ToR SALE — WOOD AND IRON - 

working machinery; sawmill edg- 
gers, lathmills, saw tables, surfacers, 
sharpers. Northern Macalnery com- 
pany. Minneapolis. 



FOR SALE — NEW ANl' SECOND- 
hani engines, boilers, portable saw- 
mills, planers, matchers, resaws, pul- 
levs, shaftiTig hangers and boxes. 
'Phone »1. 

DULUTH MACHINERY CO. 



FOR SALE — ^ BLACK DIRT 
dairy manure. ■ H. B. Keedy, 
London road. Bot'.i 'phones. 



AND 
1709 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS FOR 
light housekeeping. 7 Munger row, 
Fifty-third a venue west. 

FOR RENT — BEAUTIFULLY FUR 

nishcd rooms; all conveniences; rea- 
sonable rates. 314 East Second 

street. ^ . 

FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS; CENTRAL 
location, at only l« Per month. In- 
quire a t 501 West Michigan street. 

FOR RENT— NICE. COSY ROOM WITH 
all conveniences for two or three per- 
sons, furnislied, heat; reasonable for 
the winter. 319 Mesaba place. 

FOR RENT — LARGE FURNISHED 
room, suitable for two; heat and 
bath. 608 Vj. West Secor.d street. 

i^^R RKNT — TWO FURNISHED 

rooms for liglit hou.sekeeplng; every- 
thing modern except heat. 1» tit- 
teenth avenue west. 



I. 



— DULUTH'S— 
PROGRESSIVE 

—FIRMS — 

Something is Always Wanted. 
Just what it is, who makes it, sells it, or 
does it, and where it may be obtained. 



J 



J 



BLACKSMITHS AND 
MAKERS. 



WAGON 



Horseshoeing and Repairing — Devaney 
& Jordan, 20-22 First avenue west. 



CARRIAGE & AUTO PAINTING. 



Also sign painting. 
East First street. 



M. H. Smith, 26 
Bell 'phone 26SS. 



L*DuMih a3 3ppm 

Ar lauClait* sjopoi 
ArM«di»./n 1 i>am 

At J<rir*vi:.e ^ >5ain 

• Dally, liba^ept Svanay 



be i5|un 

S 35Pn' 
iu aopa 
3 ♦ aiii 
;a,>an: 
4St«ii. 
3n«.- 



Lv Dulbth 
Lv Superior 
Ar St. Paul 
S.! M 'polls 






»4 35P!" 
4 5SPa 
9 55pm 
ajpn 



:<ir> to Chicai^o. Parlor aaJ 
;»fe ;aislo Twill Cltie*. OAc« 
'>m W Superior bt. . Duiulh. 



^ DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE & ATUNTIC 



Mo S 
AM 



.No. «; 

P M ! 



No. 7 
A.M. 



No. 5 
P.M. 



t7 «) 
t.OSI 



;' 



•S.I5;. 
.4 M. 



/ 



t7.46 
fS.35' 

tc.ss 

♦ 7.45 



•3.M . 
•4.30!. 
•10. Ul, 
••.001 . 
•».I5 . 



Duluth 

. . . . Superior . • • 

Hou«btoa . . . 
Calumat 

Islisemlng. ... 

. ■ . . Marquctt* . . . 
.Saolc .■''e. Mart* 

Mciitrca! ... 

Buatoa . . . ■ 



.At|*l0.30| 
......I0.I51 

I P.M 
.L»i* 10.30] 
...I •9.40 
P.M. 
'I2.2S 
•tl.30 
•5.30 
•9.50| 
MO.OOl 



to. 93 
T8.40 



A.M. 
t7.5S 

t6.43 



A.M , 
tO.0O| 



P.M. I 

•7.10tL».. 
AM. I 
•7.18 At. 



MoQtreal 
..New Tork 



I A.M.! P.M. 

.Ar •7.30|tlO.IS 

P.M. I A.M. 

.Lt •7.001 r8.49 



•Daily tUatlj except :juuddy. 
Km. 7 and 8. 



Dining car un Tfailii* 



THE GREAT NORTHERN 



Le«»« 



STATIO.NS 



Arrive. 



f 1.00 aaij I 
*a.2S pm! j 
• K.IO pm 
•I 43 an 
••.3S pm 
12.20 pm 
4 t.OO am 



ST. PAUL 

and 

MINNEAPOLIS. 

\ Crookaton. Uraiid Forlu. 
I Montaii.1 and Coast 

Swan Rlfer. Hltblns. VtrdiUa 
St. Cloud. WUmar. Sloui City 



*^DalIy. tDsU* except 
raadf at v. a OClce. 



>IO.IS pm 
•1.55 pm 
•6.30 am 
•e.3S pm 

•7.ISam 
1 12.30 pm 

tlO.15 pm 

liunday. Twla City ilcwtn 



Boyle's European Hotel, 

317-319 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

Koonia, 75c up to $2.00. 

Remodelsd throughout: flnest 
cafe In city, serving all the delt- 
caclea the market produces, togeth- 
er with flsh and game in season. 

CIIAS. BOi'LK, I'rop. 



THE PIICOl,L.ET HOTCI.. 

WELL FUPNISHEO HOOMS. U 'M PER WEEK. 

—OPPOSITE UNION DEPOT.— 

SI 7-S 19-52 1 -523 West Mlehlfan StrMt 

5l8-520-522-i24 WMt Superior StrMt 



NOTICE FOR BID.s — 

Offline ot' the Board of Fire Commission 

era. 

City of Duluth. October 14. 

Sealed bids will be received 
Board of Fire Commissioner?* 
for tlie corporation of the City 
luth Minnnesota. at tlieir office 
city. Room 31 City Hail, up to 2 
- ■ Oc 



10 feet. S43 



1909. 
bv the 
in and 
of Du- 
in said 
o'clock 
p m. on Friday. October 22. 1909. for 
furnishing the City of Duluth with 
material, as per list, to be delivered 
at No 2 Fire Hall, in .said City: 

44.^52 ereoaoted paving block.s. 3 by 

Lumber — 9.360 feet 2 by 6. matched 
flooring, 12 and 14 -foot lengths. 

7> pieces 2 by 14 feet. No. 1. 

60 pieces 3 by 10 by 
Wasliington fir. .,.,.. 

ftlill Work — 1 partition, lo by 4.S feet 
Oeorgij. Pine, according to detailed 
plan.s and specifications on file In the 
office of Radcliffe & Price. Architects. 

Separated bid.s must be submitted, and 
marke.' as foUow.s; ''Bid for Paving 
blocks;" "Bid for lumber." "Bid for mill 
work." and accompanied witti a cer- 
tifl''<r check for ten per cent of the 
bid. pavable to F. J. Voss, City Trea- 
surer, addressed to Board of Fire Com- 
nil^sioners. City Hall. 

The board re.«ervea the right to re- 

(ect any and all bids. 
JOARD OF FIRE COMMI.^.^IONKRS. 
By HARKY H. I. P: MONT. 

Secretary. 
D. E. H. Oct. 14 and 15. D. 284. 



"W'e, the undersigned, hereby asso- 
ciate ourselves together for the pur- 
pose of organizing a corporation under 
and by virtue of the statutes of the 
I Slate of Minnesota, and for that pur- 
pose we do hereby adopt the following 
Vr tides of Incorporation: 
ARTICLE I. 
The name of tliis corporation shall 
he Thomas Felgli Land Company. 

The general nature of its business 
shall be to buy. sell, hold, improve, 
'•cut, manage and otherwise deal in all 
kinds of real and personal property, 
and to do such acts and transact such 
bu.^iness as principal or as agent for 
nnv other firm, person or corporation. 

The principal place of transacting 
the business of this corporati<m shall 
be a? Duluth, in St. Louis County, Min- 
nesota. 

ARTICLE II. 
The time of the commencement of 
this corporation shall be upon the com- 
pletion of its incorporation, and the 
l>eriod of its continuance shall be thir- 
tv (.uO> years. 

ARTICLE IIL 
The names and places of residence 
of the persons forming this corpora- 
tion ;tre Thomas Feigh. C. O. Baldwin 
and Albert Baldwin, all oi whom reside 
at Duluth, Minnesota. 

ARTItJLE IV. 
The management of this corporation 
and tl'.e conduct of its affairs shall be 
ve-!ted In a board of seven directors, 
all of whom shall be stockholders, and 
wlio .-hall be elected at the annual 
meeting of stockholders to be held at 
the compauvs office at two o'clock in 
th'> afternoon, on the first Wednesday 
in September of each year, and in a 
President, a Vice I'resldent. a Secre- 
tary and a Treasurer, all of whom shall 
he directors, and who sliall be elected 
t.y the board of ilirectors at a time 
an-l plac*» and In a manner to be pre- 
scribed bv the by-laws of tliis corpora- 1 
tion. One person may hold the offices 
of Secretarv and Treasurer or President 
and Treasurer at the same time. 

The names and addresses of the per- 
sons composing the first board of di- 
rectors of this corporation, to serve 
until the first annual meeting of stock- 
holders and until their successors are 
elect'^d are: Thomas Feigh. C. O. Bald- 
win Albert Baldwin. I'atrick Hammel 
and Michael A. Keele.v, all of Duluth. 
Minnf'sota; M. J. Comerford of Plck- 
nev. Michigan, and Edward Fetgli of 
• "liicago. Illinois: of whom said Thomas 
Feigti shall be Presld*»nt and Treasurer, 
.-said M. J. Comerford shall be Vice 
President, and said C. O. Baldwin shall 
be Secretary. 

ARTICLE V. , ^ 

The amount of the capital stock of 
liiis corporation shall be fifty thou- 
sand dollars (jr.o.OOO.OO), to be divided 
into five thousand (5.000) shares of 
ten dollars ($10.00) each, and shall be 
paid in as required by the board of 
directors. _ 

ARTICLE VL 
The highest amount of indebtedness 
or liability to which this corporation 
sliall at anv time be subject Is fitty 
tliousand dollars ( J50. 000.00). 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF 
hereunto set our liands and 
Uth day of October. 1909. 
THOMAS FEIOH. 
C. O. BALDWIN. 
ALBERT BALDWIN. 
In Presence of 
H. .V. DANCER. 
AtiNES NESS. 

State of Minnesota, County of .St, Louis 

i7n 'this 8th day of October, 1909, be- 
fore me. a Notarv Public within and 
for said county, personally appeared 
Tliomas Feigh, C. O. Baldwin and .Al- 
bert Baldwin, to me known to be the 
persons described In and who e.xecuted 
the foregoing Instrument, and acknowl- 
edged that they executed the same as 
their free act and deed^ r>ANCER. 

Notarv Public, St. Louis County, Minij. 

Mv commission expires Sept. 23. 1911. 

(Notarial Seal, St. Louis County. Minn.) 



WANTED — ^BELL BOYS. 

Commercial club. 



APPLY AT 



WANTED 

gener,il 
street. 



— CO.MPETENT 
lious-.^work. 205 



GIRL 

East 



FOR 

Third 



FOR SALE— 1250 CASH BUYS Fl'RNI- 
ture of eigiit-room house, close In. 
Rent of house and water. $25 per 
niontii. Five rooms rent for $50 per 
month. 512 Burrows building. 



W.A.NTED— SWEDISH-FINN CLERK; 
no booze fighter need apply. 411 
West Micliigan street. 

WANTED— TEN C.\SH 
boys over 14 years old. 
rupl & Sales company, 
perior street. 

WANTED AT ONCE— GOOD MEAT 
cutter. F. G. Sugg. Proctor. Old 
'phone 22. 



GIRLS -\ND 
Duluth Bank- 
219 West ?u- 



FOR .SALE— 50.,oeHJ FEET OF ONE- 
Inch sound lumber, surface one side, 
at $10 per l.OOo. Mill Brook Lumber 
companv. Old 'phone 1798, four 
rings. Tako 'Woodland car to end 
of line. InquPreat store. 



busin:ess chances. 

J^^^P^ALlJ^^BRdtrir'BHLDlNG WITH 

line of groc^les and confectionery 
counters and "fixtures. Apply 
West First street. 



602 



BUS1NE.SS CHANCES— FOR SALE— A 
monev-maklng restaurant ri good 
live cltv. If you are looking for 
something good. inve.-tigale tills 
proposition: a snap for some one. 
Address Box Ai'2. Morris. Minn. 



FOR RENT— TWO FUllNISHED ROOMS 
for housekeeping; city water, elec- 
tric lights, heat, use of bath; * 
month. 609 West Third 



CIVIL ENGINEERINa 

Duluth Engineering Co., W. B. I'atton. 
Mgr., 613 Pulladlo Blag. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 

DENTIST. 

Dr. W. H. Olson, 222 New .lersey Bldg. 
All work guaranteed. Both phones. 



KODAKS AND CAMERAS. 



Eclipse View Co.. Inc., ; 
Develops and finishes 



:0 4th .-Vve. W. 
for amateurs. 



LAUNDRY. 



Model Laundry, 126 
the work." Old 2 



E 
749 



1st St. "We do 
■L; New 1302. 



OPTICIANS. 



per 
Fti)R 




street. 



ItEXT— THREE LARGE FIIONT 

rooms on second Hoor of our bulld- 

suUable for offices or work 

Apply Ron Fernandez Cigar 

312 West Second street. 



ing 

rooms. 

company. 



PLEASANT, 

litahlt: 
313 Third 



FOR RENT— A LARGE, . , ,., 
front room in private lamily, suitanie 
for one or two gentlemen, 
avenue west. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room: all modern conveniences. 307 
West Fourth street. 



WANTED .\T ONCE— THREE TE.A.M- 
sters, married men preferred; must 
be strictly temperate; good wages 
and steady work. Duluth Van & 
Storage company. 



WANTED. — GOOD BOV 
Show Case company. 



AT DULUTH 



WANTED — BOY TO RUN ELEVATOR; 

must have license. ApT>l.v at Gately's 
8 East Superior street. 

WANTED — FIFTY STATION MEN 
for sandy muskeg work; 22 to 2 4 
cents per yard; steady work. Apply 
at once to National Emploj'ment 
compan.v. 5 South Fifth avenue west. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 

DO YOU NEED MONEY? 
Money loaned In Duluth or Superior to 
* salaried people without security; also 
on pianos, furniture, horses, wag- 
ons, etc. Business absolutely confi- 
dential. Call and get our rates and 
terms. Monthly or weeklv payments 
as desired. No good applicant re- 
fused. WESTERN LOAN CO. 
521 Manliattan building. 
New 'phone 936. Old 'phone 1036. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — lOR SALE— 
Central Second street rooming house, 
$350: all rooms rented: pays 
must leave city, 
hattan building. 



rented: 
"Harris, 



533 



big 
Man- 



BUSlNESfc CHANCES — V\ ANTED- A 
manager for one of out branch of- 
fices Man must have experience In 
the lumber or employment business. 
To tlie right party ther-> will be an 
opportunity to secure an interest. 
We liave the heaviest labor business 
In the Nortliwest and .vant a man 
tliat can furnish first-class 
ences. Apply to Manager 
Employment Company 
avenue west. . 

iTuSINE.SS CHANCES — FOR SALi:— 
Restaurant t^n Superior street; loca; 
tlon very central: cheup rent; $.o 
dailv Income. Terms If desired. In- 
quire 50 1 Manhattan buildi ng. 

BUSINESS CHANCE— TO EXCHANGE 
~ For good clear section of Canada 
land, stock of clothing located in 
Eastern Neliraska; will invoice about 
$10,000; want to deal with owners. 
For particulars, address J. R. Col- 
lins, 423 Main St. Fr?mont. Neb. 



refer 
National 
South Fifth 



FOR RENT— COMFORTABLE Fl II- 
nished room, for one or two; men 
preferred 420 First avenue west. 



EMPLOYMENT OFFICE^^^^^ 

Natl Emp. Co., 5 S. 5th Ave. W. Esfb. 
1882. "We get the men." 'Phones 376. 



FL,ORIST. 



C. C. STAACKE lrt6 WKST .SfPERIOU STIIKET. 
Op*n Weilue»<iay autl, Saturday ncnltij*. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING. 



Geo. Mctjurrin 
Old 815. 



Co.. 329 E. 
JOBBING. 



Superior St. 
New 9S3. 



PROFESSIONAL. 



J. J. Le Borius, llorlst, 921 E. 3rd St. 
Floral and funeral designs, cut llow- 
eis. 



FURS STORED AND REPAIRED. 



FOR RENT— THItEE 
nished; upstairs at 
street. 



R(:>OMS. UNFUR- 
223 East Seventh 



WANTED— $2,500 IX>AN FROM PRI- 
vate party on modern house and lot, 
valued at $6,500. S 66 Herald. 



We have 
seals this 

(Seal) 
(Seal) 
tSeal) 



LOANS TO SALARIED PEOPLE 
and others on furniture, pianos, horses 
and other personal property the same 
day you make applieation. 

We advance you arty amount you need 
and you can pay it back in easy month- 
ly payments. Lowest rates in tlie city. 

.MINNESOTA LOAN CO. 
205 Palladio. Zenith 883. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNITURE, 
horses, wagons or any personal se- 
curitv at the lowest rates of any 
place \$ the city. Our large clientage 
and twenty-five years' experience 
should be sufficient proof that we do 
business right. Call and see us be- 
fore closing deal elsewhere. Duluth 
Mortgage Loan Co.. 430 Manhattan 
building. William Horkan. manager. 
Zenit h 1598-D: old 65-M. 

MONEY supplied to salaried people, 
housekeepers and others, upon their 
own names, without security. Easy 
payments. Offices in 66 cities. Tol- 
man 's. 509 Palladio. 

Security Mortgage Loan Company. 
401 I'IRST N.VflONAL BANK BLDG. 

We lend money to salaried people 
and otliers on furniture, pianos, horses, 
wagons, etc.. for a long or short time, 
and allow liberal discounts if paid up 
before due. _ ..,^^»„ 

YOU CAN GET IT TODAY. 

Securitv Mortgage Loan Company. 
401 FIRST -N.ATKJNAL B.V-NK BLDG. 
New 'phone 612. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — l'<^« ^^*^[±;; 
Anybody looking for a good »>"finefs 
opportunity, a snap in the tailoring 
line: a good worked- up business, 
good stock and fixtures; 
selling on application 
Herald. 



reason 
Address C 



for 
185, 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS. UNFUR- 

i.lshed: downstairs. 223 East Seventh 

str.eet^ . 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM IN A 
modern fiat. 24 West First s treet. 

?7m' RENT — FOUIt ROOMS B.\SE- 
ment, city water, sewer, at 129 First 
avenue west, $10 Pei' nionlh. \N . M. 
Prindle & Co., Lonsdale building. 

FOR RENT — NICE STEA.M HEATED, 
furnished room in private lamily. 
119 Tenth avenue east. 



Have your furs 
garments made 
Duluth Fur Co 
Zenith. 624 



repaired now. Fur 
to order a specialty. 
, 325 West First St. 



FURNITURE AND PIANOS. 



Polisiied and repaired. 
Hill, 236 E. Sup St. Old 



Thompson & 

■pliniie 2828-L 



DR MITIMIELL. ELECTRO-MAGNET- 
lo specialist, has positive cure lor 
kidney, liver, heart, all stomach trou- 
bles, nervousness, paralysis, deai- 
ness. blindness and piles. 325 West 
First street, upstairs. 



ROOFING AND SHEET METAL. 



C. L BURMA N. 2005 WEST 
street. Zenith 'phone 424-A. 



FIRST 



FURNITURE AND STOVES. 

All kinds at lowest prices. Shapiro, 12 
First avenue W. Zenith 'phone 1032. 



FURNITURE RECOVERED. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
heated room, with private bath and 
entrance; suitable for one or two 
people; reasonable reut. Call 
Fourth avenue west. 



at 214 



FOlTirENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
rooms In modern new flat. "1 he 
Cliatliam. flat 6. across trom high 
school, old 'phone 2515-L^ 



FOR RENT— THREE 
unfurnished rooms, 
avenue west. 



FURNISHED OK 
322 Forty-third 



FOR RENT — LARGE. PLEAS.ANT 
room, unfurnished, with gas range, 
for voung couple or two girls; ref 
120 W 



Let Forsell do your 
334 E. Superior St. 



UPHOLSTERING. 
Zenitli. 'phone 949. 



HAT MFR. AND CLEANER. 



George G. 
Vollaiid, 



Moosebrugger. successor to 
24 First avenue E. "Phones. 



TAXIDERMIST. 



Birds, animals, 
application. 



etc , mounted. Prices on 
Harrison, 118 E. Sup. St. 



TURKISH BATH PARLORS. 

cure colds and all rheumatic ailment.^. 
S. Kashmir, under Hotel McKay. 



IMPROVED SHOE REPAIRING. 

GOPHER SHOE WORKS— Shops 10 1st 
avenue west and 12 4th avenue west. 



VETERINARY SURGEON. 



I (5 FORSYTH, Lyceum Sale & 
■ ing stable, 11-16 East First 
Both phones. 



Board- 
street. 



erences. 



'est Fourth street. 



DON'T FORGET TO SENI» OR 'PHONE 
vour "ad. " in early for Saturday s 
want page. Clat-slfled (columns 
at 1 » m Any "ads. taken 
at 1 p. "^•,^^,jjj'>gQ in the "Too late 



close 
after 



that time 
to classify." 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— A 
good candy store, 725 West Superior 
street. Selling It on ac<.ount of sick- 



ness. 



FARM LANDS. 



State of Minnesota, Dei)artment of 

State, , ...,,, 

I herebv certify that the within in- 
strumf»nt 'was filed for record In this 
office on the 9th day of October, A. p. 
1909, at 9 o'clock A. aL, and was duly 
recorded in Book S-3 of Incorporations, 
on page 62. ^^^^^^ ^ gCHMAHL, 

Secretary of State. 



HOW'S THIS 

JIO — Return 40c weekly. $1.60 monthly. 

$oo_Return 80c weekly. $3.20 monthly. 

$30— Return $1.20 weekly,. $4.80 mthly. 

Otlier amounts same proportion. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO. 

301 Palladio. 
Open Wednesday and Saturday 
Evenings. 
Both 'phones. 



FARMS— GOOD LAND WANTED, AT 
right price, In exchange^ for a good 
modern, up-to-date. 1 '=>-^>a':^«l j^^ 
day flour mill that has made $6,000 
clea-- profit to owner every year for 
the last six jyears; mill in splendid 
condition and,.ui operaiion now and 
everv day In the year, light and day 
to supply the. ever increasing 
and shipping demand for 
highest and best rjuality 
best of wheat secured In 
at most reasonable prices 
growers; clieap powe"- 
splendid Investment . . . 

vestigation: owner getting too old t() 
operate mill and wants to retire: will 
sell above on easy terms to respon- 
sible party. For further information 
write or call on Frank 
Taylor's Falls, Minn. 



FOR RE. N'T — NEWLY FURNISHED 
front room, all modern conveniences, 
suitable for one or two gentlemen, in 
private family. 12 First avenue west 
Flat L 



FOR RE.NT — TWO UNFURNISHED 
steam heated rooms, modern. 109 
Eighth av enue west. 

FOR RENT —TWO FURNISHED 
rooms in private family; electric 
light; $5 and $6 per month. 
910 West Fourth street. 



Call 



FOR RENT — FOUR -ROOM FLAT; 
bath and city water; very central. 
S S. Williamson. 515 Torrey building. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 

SITUATION W^ANTED^^^^^^^^^^^JCPERU 
enced stenographer wishes position; 
two years' experience. 14 North Fif- 
tv-sixth avenue west. 



SITUATION W-VNTED — BY KINDER- 
garten governess, or companion in 
good family; can furnish high refer- 
ences. Telephone Miss Swords, care 
Y'. W. C. A. 



SITUATION WANTED— AN EXPERl- 
enced bookkeeper and cashier desires 
position; thorough and conscientious 
worker. Address R. G.. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— DAY WORK. 

washing, ironing and scrubbing. 

Call New 'phone 1140-Y, after 6 p. 
m. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM. 
East Second street. 



llOi 



FOR RENT— THREE PLEAS.\NT UP- 
stairs rooms. 22 East Fourth street. 



local 
reputed 
flour from 
abundance, 
direct from 
this is a 
worthy your In- 



Fredeen, 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St, Louis 

ss. 

I herebv certify that the within In- 
strument "was filed in this office for 
record Oct. 11, 19t)9, at 11 A. M., and 
was duly recorded in Book 10 of Misc., 

naee 84. 

^^ M. C. PALMER, 

Register of Deeds, 
By THOS CLARK, 

I>eputy. 
Evening Herald. Oct. 14 and 15, 



Duluth 
1909. 



NOTICE OF PROPOSALS TO BE RE- 
RECEIVED TO BE DESKiNATED A 
DESIGNATION AS CITY DEPO&-I- 
TARY. 

Notice Is hereby given that sealed 
proposals will be received by the 
Common Council of tiie City of Duluth. 
at us meeting to be held on .Monday, 
October 25. 1909, from banks, banking 
lioui.es or trust companies, to be desig- 
nated as a depositary of the moneys 
of the city treasury of tiie City of 
I>uluth. for a terra of two years, from 
November 1st, 1909 Said moneys to be 
held subject to draft and payment at 
all times, and proposals must also des- 
Igisatf the amount of interest that will 
b» paid if time depi-sits are made. Said 
proposals must also state what secur- 
r»y will be given to said city for such 
funds so deposited 

H. W. CHEADLE, 

City Clerk. 
D. B. U. Oct. 8 and 15. D 272. 



NOTICE OF CONFIRMATION OF AS- 
* SESSMENT FOR CEMENT .SIDE- 
WALKS. WEST OF TWELFTH 
AVENUE WE.ST. 
Office of the Board of Public Works 
City of Duluth, Minn., October 15. 19o9 
Notice is hereby given that the as- 
sessment of Sixty-four hundred eigh- 
teen (6418* dollars and thirty-two 
(32) cents made by the Board of Pub- 
lic" Works upon .September 27, A. D., 
1'409, against the property specially 
benefited bv the construction of cement 
sidewalks in the City of Duluth. Min- 
nesota, west of east Hue ot Twelfth 
avenue west, was by said Board, upon 
notice duly given, confirmed on Octo- 
ber 15. A. D.. 1909, and said assess- 
ment has been duly enteretl by the 
Board of Public Works in a book kept 
bv It for that purpose. 
'* J. W. PRE.=5TON, 

president. 

Attest: 

i:. MURCHISON. _ , 

Clerk Board of Public Works. 

d'^E.'^H., Oct. 15. 1909. D. 289 



Money to loan, building and loan 
plan. Build a home or pay up that 
mortgage" in easy monthly payments. 
Union Savings Assn.. "D" Pal, bldg. 



NOTICE TO BORROWERS. 
We are now making special rates on 
loans from $10 to $100 on furniture, 
pianos, horses, wagons, etc., and to 
salaried people. You can pay your 
loan on our easy weekly or monthlj 
olan Discount allowed on all loans 
paid before due. Loans also made on 
city and farm property. Union Loan 
company, 302 Palladio building. Both 
•phone's. No. 227. ■ 

MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS 
watches, furs, rifles, etc. and all 
goods of value, $1 to $1,dO0. Key- 
.stone Loan & Mercantile Co.. 16 \\ est 
Sur.erlor street^^ 



FOR SALE— FORTY ACRES, LEVEL, 
no rock, good road, flfieen miles, on 
surveyed railroad; $10 per acre, $3 
down. Eaton, 219 Fifth avenue wes t. 

^^^ SALE— $1,000— FARM, FORTY 
acres; new house; twenty-six acres 
improved; no stone; good soil; stock 
farm utensils; fifteen tons of hay, 1. 
G Vaughan, Palladio tiuilding. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping; very 
central. Zenith 'phone 1908-.\. 



FOR RENT— FIVE ELEGANT FUR- 
nished rooms; electric light, heat, hot 
and cold water. Palace hotel, Mme. 
Gain, proprietor. 217 St. Croix ave- 
nue. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM: GAS 
and electric light; use of home" 
ladies preferred. ■' 
street, upstairs. 



227 West Fourth 



FOR RENT — HEATED ROOM IN 
Dodge block; very central. N. J. 
Upham company, 18 Third avenue 

west. _^ 

ROOMS, 
Superior 



SITUATION WANTED — A MIDDLE- 
aged widow would like a position as 
housekeeper for a respectable man 
with a small family or elderly couple. 
G 149, Herald. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— MALE. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY YOUNG 
man 20 years of age. accus- 
tomed to doing all kinds ot 
work, attending the Duluth Busi- 
ness university, a place to \vork 
mornings, evenings and .Saturd.ays 
for room and board. Apply at once 
at the coll ege office. 

SITUATION W^ ANTED — A HIGH- 
grade manager, expert accountant, 
familiar with installing systems, 
thoroughly experienced with branch- 
liouse management, sales, credits, col- 
lectlon."!. purchasing, real estate, in- 
surance, banking, an up-to-date cor- 
respondent and hard worker, is open 
for engagement. Hlgliest testimoni- 
als. What have you to offer*/ Ad- 
dress T 49. Herald. 

HAUL- 

1987-M. 



SITUATION W.^NTED- YOUNG LADY 
.with two years' office experience 
desires position in any kind of office. 
Address C 411, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY A YOUNG 
lady, position as bookkeeper; experi- 
enced and can furnish the best of 
references. W 566, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY EXPERI- 
enced stenographer; must have posi- 
tion at once. L 636, Herald. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED 
steam heated. 310 East 
street. 



MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
farms and timber claims. Guaranty 
Farm L and company. 416 Lyceum. 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
' collateral securUy; reasonable rates; 
commercial paper bought. CO. Pal- 
ladio buildings 



Bargain-hunting that does not begin 
in ad. reading isn't very satisfying — 
as a rule. 



.MONEY TO LOAN ON IMPROVED 
Drooerty $250 to $3,000. Burg & 
Hawkins, inain floor. Palladio Bldg. 



Money to 
Cooley 



loan — .^ny amount; low rates. 
& Underhill. 209 Exchange. 



FOR SALE— EIGHTY-ACRE FARM ON 
small lake; has nev,- seven-rooin 
house, barn, chicken house, fine well, 
excellent soil; 4:wenty acres cleared; 
two hours' drive from Duluth. Price, 
$1,800: term.s. Fl H. Hobe Land com- 
pany, 10 Fifth avenue 



Avest. 



Few good homesteacis, with black loam, 
good water, no stones, easily cleared, 
near school; also timber and stone 
claims. Call at once, J. E, Manes, 
Miller hotel, room 18. 



FOR SALE — LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actti^l settlers only; good 
locations for dairying and truck gar- 
dening. For further Information call 
on or address Land Commissioner, 
Duluth & Iron Range Railroad coni- 
pany. 512 Wolvin building, Duluth, 
Minn. 



FOR RENT— MODERN FURNLSHED 
room, well heated. 12 West First 
street, flat G. 



FOR RENT — ONE L.A.RGE FUR- 
nlshed room, strictly modern; elec- 
tric light and bath; on the car line. 
New 'phone 2208- Y. 



FOR RENT — PLE.VSANT ROOM FOR 
winter; very central; low rent. 127 
West Fourth street. 



MEDICAL. 

LADIES— $1,000 reward! I positively 
guarantee my great successful 
"Monthly" remedy. Safely relle%'e3 
some of the longest, most obstinate, 
abnormal cases In three to five day.s. 
No harm, pain or Interference with 
work Mail, $1.50. Double strength, 
$2. Dr. L. M. Southlngton & Co., 
Kansas City, Mo. 

LADIES— DR. LA FRANCO'S COM- 
pound; safe, speedy regulator; 25c. 
Druggist or mall. Booklet free. Dr. 
I.a Franco Philadelphia, Pa. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNC]} 
woman with one child, position as 
housekeepe r. O 583, He rald. 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG LADY 
stenographer desires position in some 
office; understands bookkeeping; 
would accept position as cashier. A 1 
references. Advertiser, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— LIGHT 

Ing for one horse. Tel ephone 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAN 
Who has good knowledge of book- 
keeping dosires position In office. 
M 628, Herald. 

SITUATKJN WANTED— A PLACE TO 
tend furnaces and chores, betore and 
after working hours in payment for 
room and board. F 3 97. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— Y'OUNG MAN, 
age 20, wishes position as salesman 
In wash goods, linens, or gents' fur- 
nishings; licensed elevator operator; 
reference.-*. Address X 489. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— AN EXPERI- 

enced office man and salesman, now 
employed inside, desires outside po- 
sition; best of references. Address 

L 539. Herald. 

SITUATION W.VNTED— BY' WILLING 
young, sober man, a position of some 
kind to work way up; wages no ob- 
ject; can draw somewhat; answer 
quick. H. Z., Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— PLAIN SEW- 
ing and children's sewing. Call 409 
East First street. 



SITUATION WANTED— OLD LADY IN 
East end wants orders for home made 
bread, gingerbread, etc. K 546, Her- 
ald. 



SITUATION WANTED— HOUSEKEEP- 

er wants position. Call between 10 
a. m. and 3 p. m.; 'phone 21Q8-X. 

SITUATION WANTED— WASHING OR 
scrubbing by the day. Apply 108 



South 
stairs. 



Thirty-ninth avenue west, up- 



SITUATION W^ANTED 
man wishes to take 
two children. A 208. 



—YOUNG W^O- 

care of one or 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— AN EXPERI- 
enced bookkeeper, now employed, de- 
sires to make change: references as 
to honesty, ability and integrity. Ad- 
dress R 503, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY Y'OUNG, 
sober, handy Scandinavian: wish po- 
sition as helper In shop or hardware 
store; has some knowledge In black- 
smithing and mechanics; steady work 
preferred. Address A 210, Herald. 



FOR SALE— ARE YOU LOOKING FOR 
a home? Forty acres ^S'isconsln farm 
near new railroad survey of Omalia, 
15 acres cultivated and 
soil: house 16 by 20 by 
log barns, 16 by 20 
Price, only $810j 



fenced; good 

12 by 20; two 

and 12 by 20. 

wortii double what 



I ask. Write 
berland. Wis. 



Gust Hafslund, Cum- 



MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE. 
Lowest rates. L. K. Larsen company, 
214-215 Providence building. 



GRADING, SODDING & SEEDING 

J^iJK^SALE^^^^^Bl^'inSri^^ 

loam. James Willper. .Zenith 2059-Y. 



ORIENTAL RUG REPAIRING. 

^IfT'^AVEDTssTANr^ARa^^ 

expert Restorer of Persian rugs; 
spots crooks and wrinkles taken out. 
395 Bast Superior street. Goods 
called for and delivered. Old, 502-K, 



L. A. Larsen Co.. Prov. Bldg., sells lands 



WANTED TO 55J5J1:____ 

WANTED TO RENT - LARGE FUR- 
nished room, suitable for two ladies; 
must be warm and central. Address 
Y 342, Herald. 

DONT FOR(; 
your "ad." 
want page, 
at 1 p. m. 
that time 
to classify 



ET TO SEND OR 'PHONE 

in early for Saturday's 

Classified columns close 

Any "adK" taken after 

win go in the "Too late 



FOR RENT — MISCELLANEOUS, 

^^^^'^'^^NT^IbARN AT 318^ WEST 
Fourth street; concrete floor, water, 
gas electric light; finished room sec- 
ond fioor; large storage capacity. 
William E. Richardson. 



MUSIC 




MUSIC. ____ 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS OF EVERT 

description. Edison phono- 
graplij. band and or- 
c h e 3 t r a Injtruoienta. 
pLtfios ar.d organs. Ing- 
waid WraTGAARD. 7 
and First Avenue West. 



STOVE & FURNACE REPAIRS. 

It will pay to have an expert look over 
your furnace or heater. Gomberg, 22 
Lake avenue north. Zenith 1770-p^ 



TIMBER LANDS. 

TIMBER AND CUT - OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby. 305 Palladio building. 



FOR SALE— 160 ACRES GOOD TIM- 
ber land; also good prospects for iron 
ore In 66-20, Rainy Lake road. 517 
West Michigan street. 



I buy standing timber; also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Rupley, 615 Lyceum Bldg. 



SITUATION WANTED — PRUDENCE 

Robert, public janitor and porter, 
windows washed, floors mopped, etc. 
Branch Bethel, 508 W. Sup. Zen. 391. 



RENT— STORES. OFFICES, ETC. 

FOR RENT— TWO OR THREE DESIR- 
able stores in the center of the city. 
N. J. Upham company, 18 Third ave- 
nue west. 



FOR RENT— BARBER SHOP, WITH 
bathroom; good location. Apply Ed 
Santlni, 914 Third avenue, Hlbb i ng. 

STORE 

Inquire 

Agency, 



FOR RENT— THE FINE NEW 
at No. 408 Central avenue, 
at Getchell's House Rental 
West Duluth. 



FOR RENT — SPACE IN BACK OF 
store, 21 bv 23; heart of shopping dis- 
trict on Superior street; very light: 
gas and telephone service, also small 
space in front window for display. 
G 150 Herald. 



L. A. LARSON 
dence building, 



COMPANY, 
sells timber 



PROVI- 

lands. 



WANTED TO RENT — THREE UN- 
furnlshed rooms for housekeeping; 
central location. Call Zenith "phone 
1043-A. 



BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY. DEALERS 
in all kinds of musical merchandise. 
Largest stock of violins at the Head 
of the Lakes. 105 West First street. 



Cameron. 



UPHOLSTERING. 

the upholsterer, has 
Now Is the time to 



both 
have 



DRESSMAKING. 



First-class Dressmaking. Mrs. 
Sloan. 24 E. First St. Zenith 



J. 

1769- 



R. 
D. 



CLOTHES CLEANED & PRESSED 

Suits pressed. 50c; pants, 15c. Ladies' 
skirts cleaned and pressed; 50c. Zen. 
ISS'-X J. Oreckovsky. 10 4th Av. W. 



W^ANTED — TENANTS FOR NEW 
stores and boarding house being 
built on corner of Michigan street 
and Twelfth avenue west; will ar- 
range to suit tenants. Stryker, Man- 
ley & B uck. 

1 



FOR RENT— ROOM 50 BY 75 
fifth floor. Christie building 
light, power connections for 
facturlng; also front office on 
floor. Apply Christie Lithograph 
Printing company. 



f:et, 

good 

manu- 

second 

& 



PATENTS. 



^SrworkXke.'Wok^2iTBtAv^ W.UOHN MULLER. 208 



Weat First 



PATENTS — ALL ABOUT 

Street I See Stevens, •10 Seliwood 



PATENTS, 
building. 



your 



■T-i — r«-gg 



MiM* 



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DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 




BOTH LINES 



« 

iws 




PHONE YOUR WANTS TO THE HERALD 



One Cent a Woril EIucli Insertion. 
No A(lverti>«i>nient Le»«s Tliau 15 Cents. 

SHOPPINCT"^ 
BY TELEPHONE. 



Old 


New 


'Phone. 


'Phone. 


MEAT MARKETS — 




B. J. Tobt-n 22 


22 


Mork Uros 1590 


1S9 


LAV JURIES — 




Yale Laundry 479 


479 


Lutes Laundry 447 


447 


Troy Laundry 2o7 


267 


DKlGCaSTS — 




I':ddle Joronimus 1243 


1027 


Bi.vre 163 


163 


BAKERIES 




The Bon Ton 1720- A 


1128 


IVOOD — 




W. S. EllinpTPen 


1730-A 


ITPIIOLSTEUI.XG — 




Kd Ott 651-L 


1997-Y 


ARfHITECTS — 




Frank L. Young & CO.2120-L. 




MII.i.l.XKRY — 




M. A. Cox 57S-R 




PIA.XO TIMXG — 




C. A. droKory 


€06 


TEXTS A.\D AWM.NGS— . 




i'oirler & Co 


735 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

LXSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 

Jolin A. Stephenson, Wolvln building. 
K. D. Field Co., 2«3 Kxchange building. 
L. A. Larsen Co., Providence building. 



FOR SALE — MISCELLANEOUS. 

fHJlP5ALE^^^3i^A7uP^^To3A^ 

buggy, in good condition. 4 Munger 
terrace. 

FOR SALfi — LARGEST S.\LE EVER 
held In the Northwest; e.xtraordinary 
and compulsory sale at auction of 
valuable staple merchandise of every 
de.scrlptlon. same being wrecked and 
unclaimed freight collected at points 
from Cliioago to Pacific coast FROM 
THE C. B. & Q, NORTHERN PA- 
CIFIC. SOO ASU WISCONSIN CEN- 
TRAL RAILROADS; inventory value 
over ?55,0U0; sale will be held Oct. 
18. 19, 2l>, 21 and 22 ne.xt at the ware- 
house of the W. & L>. Railroad Stor- 
age & Railroad Warehouse company. 
227 and 229 First stittt north. Min- 
neapulis. Minn., commencing at 10 a. 
m. sluup eacli day. Amongst the 
more Important items will be found 
2,000 pairs ladies', gents and infants' 
high-grade boots, shoes and slippers; 
5i'U dozen pairs of ladies', gent s and 
children's rubbers and overshoes; 300 
fancy suits clotliing in men's and 
youths' sizes; staple dry goods and 
noti<.>ns. including 500 ladies' dress 
patterns in high-grade material and 
fashionable shades; silks; 50 dozen 
ladies rieeoed lined underwear: 25,- 
000 yards ginghams, percales, prints, 
flannels: ladies' handkerchiefs; lOo 
dozen pairs ladies' and children's 
hosiery; ladies' cloaks, suits, skirts, 
etc.: gent's furnishing poods, includ- 
ing fine line uf higli-grade fashion- 
able fall gloves, '^h dozen umbrellas, 
shirts, underwear, hosiery, handker- 
chiefs, hats, caps, etc.; large line of 
furniture, rugs, etc., of all kinds, in- 
cluding tine leather couches, rockers. 
125 fine Axminster, Wilton, velvet, 
Brussels and ingrain rugs in all sizes; 
lott pairs Arabian, Battenberg and 
Nottingham lace curtains, drayery 
materials; 4t'0 sacks granulated su- 
gar; 25,000 cigars, including 10,000 
Owl brand; smoking and shewing 
tobiccos; 11.000 l:;-pound cartons of 
pepper; 30 barrels New Orleans mo- 
lasses; hardware, machinery, painls, 
oils, grease, drugs, patent medicines, 
perfumes, phonographs, bruslies, 
stock and poultry foeds, stoves, up- 
right piano, crockery, glass, 1 case 
of ladies' lurs; tinware, nails. Can- 
ton matting, optical instruments, 
leather, rope, white lead, sewing ma- 
chines, 100 wasiiing machines, hay 
and manure forks, books, wall paper, 
tents, vacuum cleaner, electric sup- 
plies, cream separators, fire extin- 
guisiiers, paper musical instruments 
and other items too numerous to 
menlioi, togetlier wiij" about '~^)'< 
trunks, boxes, etc., contents unknown. 
Goc>ds will be sold in lots to suit 
buyeis. and may be inspected morn- 
ings of sale from 8 a. m. Hubert 
Bown &, Co., Auctioneers, Minneapo- 
lis. 



FOR SALE — ONE LARGE AND ONE 
small heater; also refrigerator and 
one coffee urn. 2401 West Superior 
street. 



WANTED— RENEWALS AND S'JP- 
scriptions for the La lies' Home Jour- 
nal and Saturday Evening Pos: for 
a scholarship. Miss L. Kluge, il"*rald 
office. Ser.d me your Christmas or- 
ders. Rate. J1.50 year each. 



FOR SALE — FURNITURE, THREE 
bedroom sets, chiffonier, leather 
couch, writing desk and bookcase 
combined, kitchen range and other 
articles containing hand paintings. 
2201 West Fourtli street. 



FOR SALE CHE.\P— H.A.RD COAL 
heater. Call at 2308 West Third 
street, upper flat. 

FOR S.\LE— NEW UP-TO-DATE BABY 
buggy; good condition. 4 Munger 
terrace. 

DON'T FORGET TO SEND OR PHONE 
your "ad. ' in early for Saturday's 
want page. Classitied columns close 
at 1 p. m. Any "ads." taken after 
that time will go In the "Too late 
to classify." 



FOR SALE — SAFES, OI'FICE FUR.M- 
ture. architects' and engineers' sup- 
plies, typewriters and supplies. J. S. 
liay Co.. 406 W. Sup. St. Both 'phones. 



FOR SALE— DIA-MONDS — WE HAVE 
a large stock of unredeeemed dia- 
monds which we will sell at large 
reductions. Keystone Loan company, 
IG West Superior street. 



FOR SALE— A SECOND-HAND J600 
piano for less than $100 cash. 1710 
Jefferson street, evenings. 



FOR SALE — MEDIUM-SIZED COAL 
heater, cheap. 1302 West First 
street. 



FOlt SALE— LARGE SIZE HEATING 
stove, standard make, almost new. 201 
West Third street. 



FOIi SALE— STEINWAY SQUARE 
piano, $35. Call evenings alter 8. 



1507 West Superior street. 



\ FOl 



FOR S.\LE— PL\NO USED ABOUT 
three months by music teacher; was 
$350. for (juick sale, $250. Brad- 
bury Music company, 6 East Supe- 
rior street. 

FOR SALE— CHEAP. EIGHTEEN- 

foot launch and boathouse. Call Ze- 
nith 'phone 1919-.\. 



FOR SALE— KIMBALL UPRIGHT 
piano; $50 cash takes this snap. 
Bradbury Music company, 6 East Su- 
perior street. 

FOR .SALE — BUILDING ROCK. 1320 
Jefferson street. Zenith phone 1535. 

FOR SALE— STEEL RANGe'wHICH I 
have had a sliort time; good as new; 
will sell for less than halt price: call 
and tee me. 608 North Fifty-sixth 
avenue west. Zenith 'phone 3001. 

FOR SALE— TWO IRON BEDS AND 
kitchen table; cheap If taken at once. 
Call 4 19 '/a East Fourth street. 

FOR SALE— CHEAP IF TAKEN AT 
once, one large and one small heater. 
Call 3 West Fifth .'•treet. 

(Continued on Page 27.) 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertis^'ment Less Than 15 Cents. 

'forT^ent^^^flats^ 

FOR 'REiiT^^^^GOoifFOirirA^ 

room flats. First street and Eleventh 
avenue west; warm In winter; low 
rent. Inquire old 'phone 1918-M. 



FOR RENT— STRICTLY MODERN SIOC- 
room flat on First street; heat, gas 
range, water and janitor service 
furnished; $45. Dowse & Co., 106 
l*rovidencc building. 



FOR PiENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT; 
warm and cozy for winter; modern, 
williout heat; $20 per month. Ap- 
ply 517 First avenue east. 

FOR RENT — DESIRABLE AP.\RT- 
ments; each six rooms and store- 
room: nicely finished; steam heat, hot 
and cold water; janitor service; gas 
range, laundry tubs and dryers. Cor- 
porate Investment company, Torrey 
building. 



FOR RENT— SIX AND FIVE-ROOM 
flats at 1330 West Michig'an street; 
modern; all conveniences. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM HEATED 

flat, modern in every respect. East 
end; $30 per month. Apply rental de- 
partment, John A. Steplienson, Wol- 
vln building. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT; MOD- 
ern in every particular except heat; 
822 East Fifth street. Apply at 
Cooley & UnderhlU's. 



FOR RENT— FOUR AND FIVE-ROOM 
central First street flats; all modern 
conveniences; $10 up to $18. "Harris, ' 
533 Manhattan building. 



FOR RENT— LARGE, LIGHT, FIVE- 
room flat; water, toilet, gas, cookmg 
or light; 518 Lake avenue north; 
$16. "Harris," 533 Manhattan build- 
ing. 



FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM STEAM- 
heated flat; light rooms; hot water; 
hardwood floor; janitor service. 216 
East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT; 

electric light, bath and sewer; $18. 
Apply at 2816 Helm street. 



FOR RENT — FINEST MODERN 
seven-room flat in city; hot water; 
janitor service; outside rooms; rea- 
sonable rent. Inquire Minnesota flat 
D. lis East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR -ROOM HE.-VTED 
flat; hardwood floors, gas range, 
bath; rent $27. Corporate Investment 
company, Torrey building^ 

FOR RENT-^iX-ROOir~AND FOUR- 
room modern flats, 24 and 30 Fourth 
avenue. Inquire 18 Fourth avenue 
east. 

FOR RENT— THREE-ROOM FLAT, 
unfurnished; water; light. Ill West 
Fifth street^ ' 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FL^\T. 
downstairs, 119 East Seventh street; 
all modern except heat; laundry in 

- basement: warm for the winter. Ap- 
ply at 1225 East Seventh street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 
downstairs, at 313 West Second 
street; $20 per month; modern ex- 
cept heat. W. M. Prindle & Co. 



FOR RENT — TWO FIVE-ROOM 
flats; central; water, sewer and gas. 
609 First National Bank building. 
Both 'phones 1086. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM BRICK 
flat, Eiehteenth avenue west and Su- 
perior street. $20. Inquire S. S. Alt- 
schul. 129 Second avenue east. Zenith 
phone. 174 7-Y^ 

FOR RENT — NEW FLAT: ALL CON- 
veniences, except heat. 215 West 
Seventh street. 



FOR RENT- CHOICE $12 FLAT ON 
West First street; city water, toilet, 
electric light. Apply old 'phone, 2758, 
1119 East First street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE- ROOM FLAT AT 

2809 Railroad street; electric light, 
water and toilet. Inquire at A. Heg- 
land. 2709 West Second street. New 
'phone 1075-A. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT; HOT 
water heat and all other conveni- 
ences: West end. Apply A. H. W. 
Eckstein. 301 Burrows building. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT. EAST 
end; furnished cr unfurnished. Old 
'phone 1133-M. 



FOR RENT — MOI>ERN FIVE-ROOM 
flat. For information call 2004 West 
Superior street. New 'phone 752; old 
'phone 1052-K. 



FOR RENT — SEVEN ROOMS IN ELE- 
gant new brick St. Marco flats, 222- 
24 West Third street; hardwood 
throughout; laundry and garbage 
chute. Prindle & Co. 



FOR RENT — MODERN FIVE-ROOM 
downstairs flat. 1020 East S.ixth 
street. 



HORSES, vehicles, ETC. 

ToGGING^HORSES. 
DRAFT HORSES. 



LUMBERMEN, TAKE NOTICE. 

W have for sale at our barn oppo- 
site the Dulutli postoffice, the finest 
bunch of big logging and draft horses 
ever brought to Duluth. Part time 
given if desired. 

BARRET & ZIMMERMAN. 

Duluth, Minn. 



FOR SALE— H O R S E S. HORSES, 
horses of all kinds. Loggers, take 
notice! Have just received two cars 
of first-class heavy draft liorses. 
weighing from 1.500 to 1.800 pounds, 
several 1,300 to 1.400-pound wagon 
liorses; also handsome pair black 
horses suitable for hearse, carriage, 
fancy wagon or excellent big family 
team, thoroughly city broke; between 
Twenty-first and Twenty-.second ave- 
nue east on Water street, opposite 
East End Ice company. 'Phone 
2382-X. 

FOR SALE— PAIR PONIES, 5 AND 7 
years old. reasonable; one mare, 
weighing 1,400 pounds, 7 years. Call 
1609 West Michigan street. 

FOR SALE— A HEAVY TEAM, HAR- 
ness and wagon, two sets of sleds, 
small camp outfit. Inquire at North 
Star employment office. 

FOR SALE CHEAP — FOUR-ROO.M 
house and lot. 6210 Green street. 

Ft:>R SALE— THREE TEAMS WEIGH- 
ing 3,200 pounds apiece. 927 West 
Fifth street. 



FOR SALE — HORSES. 
Third street. 



911 



EAST 



FOR SALE — DRAFT, DELIVERY, 
farm mares and drivers always on 
hand at our new stables, 308 East 
First street. Also wagons of all 
kinds. L. Hammel company. 



^AGENTS WANTED. 

AGENTS— LIVE AGENTS WANTED TO 
sell mining stock in proven mine. 
Fine inducement for hustler.«!. For 
particulars write X P., Herald. 

AGENTS — ANYONE, ANYWHERE^ 

\ can start a mall order business at 

home; no canvassing; be your own 

boss. Send for free booklet. Tells 

how. Heaco ck, 1218, Lockport, N. Y. 

AGENTS— START YOUR O'WN BUSf- 
ness, capital not required. Adveitis- 
Ing novelties; 14 samples mailed for 
25c. Pencil Adv. Co., East Orange, N. J. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

help^wanted^^^femalI; 



is- 



WANTED. 
CASH GIRL AT ONCE. 



J. M. GIDDING COMPANY. 



WANTED — PEOPLE TO DRINK MAL- 
comson's teas and coffees. New 
'phone 3232-A. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Tlian 15 Cents. 

wmii 
mm 




# * 

^ WANTED # 

# * 
>^ Good stock girl for cloak and siiit •3f 
^ department. Apply manager suit -^ 
^ department, second floor at -j^ 

# FREIMUTHS. # 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1106 East Second street. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1119 East Fourth street. 

WANTED— COOK, $40 MONTHLY. 2532 
West Superior street. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1106 East Second street. 
Flat C. 

WANTED— LADIES TO CALL SALVA- 
tlon Army when you have old 
clothes, furniture, etc. Old 1003-K; 
new 2134-Y. 

WANTED— SCANDINAVIAN GIRL FOR 
boarding house. 2727 West Helm 
street. 

WANTED- 
Kay. 



-TOAST GIRL. HOTEL Mc- 



DYE WORKS. 

Interstate Cleaning & Dyeing Co., 217 
E. Sup. St. New, 30; old, 2530. Best 
and most efficient plant in the city. 



ZENITH CITY DYE WORKS— LARG- 

est and most reliable. All work done 
in Duluth. Work called for and de- 
livered. 'Phones: Old, 1154-R; new, 
1888. 232 East Superior street. 



DULUTH DYE W^ORKS — French Dry 
Cleaning; fancy dyeing. Old 'phone 
2828-R; new, 1191-A. 330 E. Sup. St. 



East End Dyeing & Cleaning Co. Work 
done while you wait. 9. '6 East Su- 
perior St. Zenith, 1245-X; old, 2742-R. 



Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co., 
oldest reliable dyers and French dry 
cleaners in Northwest. 15 Lake Ave. 
north. 'Phones: .New, 1516; old, 1337. 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 

FOR SALE — AM LEAVING CITY; 
must sell best building corner In 
W'est Duluth: room for two houses. 
Cash or terms. J 486', Herald. 



FOR SALE — LOT FOR SALE 25 BY 
140, two blocks from car line. Thirty- 
ninth avenue west; must he sold at 
once. H. Craig, 4401 Oneota street, 
new 'phone 3111-A. 



WANTED- RENEWALS AND SUB- 
scriptions for the Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal and Saturday Evening Post for 
a scholarship. Miss L. Kluge. Herald 
office Send me your Cliristmas or- 
ders. Rate, $1.50 ye.ir each. 



WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 

general housework; must be good 

cook. Mrs. A. C. Hubbell. 1105 East 
First street. 



WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework: family of two. 
409 West Second street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR WAITING ON 
table at Omaha restaurant, 523 West 
Superior street. 



WANTED— A GOOD, STRONG KITCH- 
en girl. 1232 East First street. 



WANTED — EXPERIP:NCED GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1424 East Sec- 
ond street. 



WANTED — A GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Apply 323 West Second 
street. 



WANTED— MIDDLE-AGED WO.MAN. 
Norwegian preferred, to do house- 
keeping and take care of two cliil- 
dren. Alfred Peterson. 3212 Restor- 
mel street. 



WANTED — DISHWASHERS AT ONCE. 
1909 West Superior street. 



WANTED— A GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 226 West Third street. 



WANTED — MIDDLE-AGED LADY 

palmist and card reader. Address 
"Palmist." city viostoffice. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. E. A. Sil- 
bersteln, 517 East Third street. 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework. 1001 East Second 
street. 



WANTED — AT ONCE, TWELVE 
salesladies. No. 6 Lake avenue south. 



AV.A.NTED— C0MPF:TENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. Edward 
Hazen. 1113 East First street. 



WANTED AT ONCE— .\ NEAT YOUNG 

girl wlio understands plain cooking. 

Apply to Mrs. W. L. Windom, 2018 
East Second street. 



WANTED— EXPERIENCED MARKER 
and sorter as a helper. 1536 West 
Superior street. 



WANTED— A COMPETENT GIRL; NO 
washing; best of wages. 2311 East 
Third street. 



WANTED — BRIGHT YOUNG LADY 
with some business ability; good 
mf>ney to right person. Call at 327 
West Superior street, between 6 and 
6:30 p. m. 



FOR SALE— CORNER LOT; CENTRAL 
location for stoi'« or flats; $400 
cash, balance in three years; build 
now. "Harris," 538 Manhattan build- 
ing. 



BOARD OFFERED. 

ROOM ANiTbOARd! 210^WEST SEC- 
ond street. 



BOARD AND ROOM AT COLONIAL, 16 
West Second street. Zenith 'phone 
2340- Y. 



BOARD OFFERED — FIRST - CLASS 
board, with room, $5 per week. 114 
West Second strecL 



BOARD AND ROOM — R AL S T O N 
house, 122 East First street. 



BOARD OFFERED— NICE, NEW FUR- 
nished rooms, with board, at reason- 
able price. 120 East Thiid street 



Room and Board — 301 East Third St. 



STOVE REPAIRS. 

WE CAR'TTYTfTsTOCK'^RE^PAlRS FOR 
10,000 different stoves and ranges. 
C. F. Wiggerts & Son. 410 East Su- 
perior street. Open Saturday even- 
ings until 9 o'clock. Both telephon^jji. 



SWEDISH lAASSACE; 

A. E. HANSEN, MASSEUrTToT^nIJu' 
Jersey building. Old 'phone 1826-K. 



Mrs. H. Wlklng, S^^tdish massage, 305 
East First street. Zenith 1894-D. 



MARI.V OniNr>F;RENG. GR.'^^PUATFD WASSKUSK. 
frciu l>r. Anetlfun's In?Utute. Sweiim. Ztnilii £44. 



WANTED TO BUY. 

Furniture & stoves — W. End Furniture 
house, 2012 \V. Sup St. Zen. 1330-A. 



WANTED TO BUY— CORD WOOD, Di- 
rect from woodsman. William Jaap, 
Lester Park Greenhouse, 



WANTED— RENEWALS .AND SUB- 

scriptions for the La-iies' Home Jour- 
nal and Saturday Evening Post, for .a 
scholarship. Miss L. Kluge, Herald 
office. Send me your Cliristmas or- 
ders. Rate. $1.50 year each. 



WANTED TO BUY — GOOD, SOUND 
horse, about 1,300 or 1,400 pounds; 
must be cheap for cash. Address W., 
care Herald. 



WANTED TO BUY — A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for investment 
I 69,' Herald. 



WANTED— YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST 
with housework; German preferred. 
Old 'phone 1689-L. 



W'ANTED AT ONCF3— GOOD NURSE 
girl. 301 East Fourth street. 



DON'T FORGET TO SEND OR 'PHONE 
your "ad." in early for Saturday s 
want page. Classified columns close 
at 1 p. m. Any "ads." taken after 
that time will go In the "Too late 
to classify." 



WANTED— AN EXPERIENCED LADY 
clerk at once. Apply at 210 Lake 
avenge south. 



WANTED — CHA.MBERMAID. APPLY 

at Spalding hotel. 



WANTED — GIRLS AT NEW EM- 
plovment office, 412 East Fourth 
street. Zenith 'phone 1709-D. 

WANTED— A COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. A. J. 
Frantz. 2234 Woodland avenue. Hunt- 
er's Park. 



WANTED— GIRLg AT MRS. SOMERS' 
employment office. 15 Second avenue 
east. 



Wanted — Ladles to learn dressmaking, 
cutting and fitting by latest French 
svstem. Suit free. 114 1st Ave. E. 



WANTED— FIFTY GIRLS. APPLY AT 
Union Match factory. West Duluth. 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 

Madame Sterling, Palm Ri^ading, 25c; 
card reading, 50c. 114 E. Superior St. 

^TICIAN. 

J.'TT'nORBERG. OPTOMETRIST AND 
optician, 102 West Superior street, 
over 5 and 10-cent store. Glasses 
fitted under guarantee and at money- 
saving prices. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Centa. 

HELP WANTED— MALE. 

*-**5w^^wf-;!f'5f*5!f*>'^*i^'*^^i^.^«^ 
* 

I 

* 



* 

* 



— "WANTED — 
— W^ANTED — 

EXPERIENCED STOVE MAN. 

Apply at 

FRENCH & BASSETT. 




W.ANTED— SOLICITORS FOR FIRST- 
class proposition. Call 12 to 1 Fri- 
day, Y. M. C. A. building. 



■at ^ 

■» WANTED! * 

* WANTED! * 
i^ ^ 

* SPECIAL BOYS. * 
« SPECIAL BOYS. * 

* * 

* GRAY-TALLANT CO. ■%■ 

* GRAY-TALLANT CO. H- 

Si, jy 



W^ANTED— THE DULUTH LIFE IN- 
surance company has room for a few 
more reliable men; good paying po- 
sitions. Please call in person. 708.- 
709 Sellwood building. J. H. Block, 
manager. 



WANTED — MEN TO LEARN BARBER 
trade; students admitted Oct. get spe- 
cial advantages. Free lllust. Cat Mo- 
ler Barber Coll., 27 E. Nlc. Av., Mplis. 



WANTED— FIFTY MEN TO SEE OUR 
unredeemed pledges; 150 men's over- 
coats, 25 fur coats, 25 rifles, 5 seal 
caps, 150 men's and ladles' watches, 
200 solid gold rings, 60 violins, etc., 
all at big reductions. Keystone 
Loan company, 16 W^est Superior 
street. 



WANTED— RENEWALS' AND .SUB- 
scriptlons for the Ladles' Home Jour- 
nal and Saturday Evening Post, for a 
scholarship. Miss L. Kluge, Herald 
office. Send me your Christma.s or- 
ders. Rate. $1.50 year each. 



DON'T FORGET TO SEND OR 'PHONE 
your "ad." in early for Saturday's 
want page. Classified columns close 
at 1 p. m. Any "ads." taken after 
that time will go in the "Too late 
to classify." 



WANTED — CIGAR SALESMAN IN 
your locality to represent us; expe- 
rience unnecessary; $110 per month 
and expenses. Write for particulars. 
Monarch Cigar company, St. Louis, 
Mo. 



WANTED — TWO STRONG BOYS, 16 
to 18 years old. and able to furnish 
good recommendations; have good 
openings, with chances of promotion. 
Gray-Tallant Co. 



WANTED — THREE GROCERY 
clerks and two butchers. Apply at 
once. Duluth Public market. 



WANTED— BOY. QU A YLE- LARSON. 

23 Second avenue west. 



WANTED AT ONCE -r- YOUNG MAN 

over 16 years of age to deliver par- 
cels, run errands and make himself 
useful; must be of neat appearance. 
J. M. Gldding company. 



WA.NTED— TRAVELING SALESMEN 
earn $1,000 to $10,000 yearl'y. Write 
for free book, "How Salesmen Suc- 
ceed,' and secure position with re- 
liable firm Bradstreet System, Dept 
59, Rochester, N. Y. 



WANTED — JANITOR AND ENGINEER. 
Must be first-class; give references 
and salary desired. Address B 356, 
Herald. 



WANTED— BUSINESS MEN DESIRING 
experienced or Inexperienced sten- 
ographers or accountants are re- 
quested to call at the National Ac- 
countants' and Stenographers' Bu- 
reau. Minnesota office at Duluth 
Business university, 600 Christie 
building. 



WANTED— MAN W'HO CAN SPEAK 
Finnish to drive single horse. Du- 
luth bakery, 2914 West Third street. 



WANTED— FOUR LABORERS. AP- 
ply D. Anderson, Kelly-How-Thom- 
son company. 

WANTED— A YOUNG MAN AS STEN- 
ographer and filing clerk. Apply to 
Northern Lumber company, Cloquet, 
Minn. 



W'ANTED— OLIVER OPERATORS, AS 
well as other stenographers, to reg- 
ister at Oliver office. \V. M. Edmont, 
116 West Superior street. 



WANTED— A YOUNG MAN IN WHOLE- 
sale office; high school graduate pre- 
ferred. Write J. 130, Herald. 



WANTED — FIRST CLASS BUSHEL- 
man and presser. S. Grassenger, 
tailor. 211 West Superior street (over 
Gasser's. ) 



(Continued on Page 27.) 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Tlian 15 Cents. 

^'"'"'^OR^REjK^^iOUSESr 

FOR RENT— HOUSE, 214 NINTH AVE- 
nue east; eight rooms; all conven- 
iences; $33 per month. Stryker, 
Manley & Buck. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

lX)ST^^^^RAwTr^LIp"M^ OUT TO 

Mrs. J. Hodges, for reward return to 
George L. Drels, Duluth Life In- 
surance company, Sellwood building. 



FOUND— A WATCH. OWNER CAN 
have same by calling at 215 South 
Nineteenth avenue east and paying 
for ad. 

LOST— DARK BROWN MULEY COW, 
white spot on forehead. Finder re- 
turn to A. Dahl, 601 East Eleventh 
street, for reward. 

LOST — KEY RING WITH THREE 
kevs. two flat, one common. Return 
to 2302 West Superior street. 



SCHOOL OF DRESSMAKING. 

CXJTrisG^^'ANVr^'^ESlGmSG, MISS 
Gray, third floor. Gray-Tallant com- 
pany. Patterns cut to order. 



'0), 



CARPET CLEANING. 

INTERSTATE^ CARPET CLEANING 
Co.. Sinotte & Van Norman, com- 
pressed air cleaners and rug weav- 
ers. Both 'phones. 1928 W. Mi ch. St. 

CARPET CLEANING — ELECTRIC 

Cleaning company. Agents and op- 
erators of the Invincible renovator; 
housecleanlng simplified. 306 East 
Superior street. Old 'phone. 1213-K; 
Zenith, 2013-A. 



Phone Your Ad Tonight 
or Early Tomorrow for 
T he Saturday Herald- 
Both Phones 324. 



V !•*< 



If you have no phone in your 
home, your nearest grocer or 
druggist will be glad to phone 
for you. 





ifdfH 








5 


um^ 









































" ' ^ 


^ ' 


■ 1 ■ ita, , 













-^ 


^ 






■ " *•■ ■■- 




^ 

















FOR RENT — LARGE, SIX-ROOM 
house, attic and basement, modern, 
furnace heat; $26; 218 East Second 
street "Harris," 533 Manhattan 

building. 



FOR RENT — NINE-ROOM MODERN 
dwelling with hot water heat, fine 
place; very warm house and large 
lot. E. D. Field company, 203 Ex- 
change building. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM HOUSE, 
two blocks from car line; $10 per 
month. Apply Ron Ferdandez Cigar 
company, 312 West Second street. 



FOR RENT — NO, 529 WEST FOURTH 
street, brick house, containing eight 
rooms; modern and In good repair; 
hot water heat; new plumbing re- 
cently installed; $30. R. B. Knox & 
Co. 



FOR RENT — AN EIGHT-ROOM 

house in Woodland; furnace, gas, 
water and sewer connections. W. W. 
Allen, West end. Zenith 'phone 1048. 



B'OR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FURNISH- 
ed house to couple without children. 
505 East Superior street 



FOR RENT— 1.ARGE LIGHT BASE- 
ment, with entrance on Superior 
street; also on Fifth avenue west. 
Stryker, Manley & Buck. 



FOR RENT— MODERN HOUSE, SIX 
rooms with bath, and four rooms in 
basement; hot water heat, gas and 
electric light. Inquire at the Home- 
stead, Thirty-first street. Park Point. 



FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE 
with bath, furnace, hardwood floors, 
full basement 1204 East Third 
street. 



FOR RE;NT — FIVE-ROOM HOUSE, 
sewer and gas; also store at 326 East 
Sixth street. Will rent together or 
separate. Apply at 326 »/4 East Sixth 
street. 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROO.M HOUSE, 
centrally located; electric lights, 
water; rooms in fine condition, $18 
per month. Inquire 501 West Michi- 
gan street. 



FOR SALE CHEAP — FOUR-ROOM 
house and lot. 6210 Green street. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE NEAR 
Clyde iron works; water, sewer, bath 
and electric light. Apply 18, Thirty- 
first avenue west 



FOR liENT— A PLEASANT SIX-ROOM 
brick house withmodern conven- 
iences, at 5t4 First avenue west. 
Apply at 512. 



FOR RENT— SIX ROOMS, HALF OF 
double house, city water paid by 
owner; central location, $12.50 per 
month. Inquire 601 West Michigan 
street. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM ALCOVE 
Brick house. Bath, heating plant. 
215 East Fifth street. Hartman 
O'Donnell agency. 205 Lonsdale Bldg. 



FOR RENT— HOUSE, 117 WEST FIFTH 
street, six-room house; sewer, bath 
and electric light; $22 per month. 
Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FOR RENT — 707 EAST FIFTH 
street, five-room house; get water 
near by; $10 a month. D. W. Scott 
& Son, 18 Mesaba block. 

FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE, 317 
West Fourth street. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. 

FOR SALE — SIX- ROOM HOUSE; 
hardwood floors downstairs; good lo- 
cation. Call 1113-L, old 'phone. 



FOR SALE— BRICK BUILDING, 602 
West First street, with line of 
groceries, confectionery, counters 
and fixtures. 



FOR SALE — 16-ROOM BO-ARDING 
house, well furnislied and paying: 
best location in the city; furnace 
heat; rent reasonable. 211 West 
Second street. 

FOR SALE— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE ON 
corner of Forty-eightli avenue west 
and Third street; all modern con- 
veniences except heat. Call 3725 
West Third street. 



FOR SALE— $2,250 CASH AND B.\L- 
ance on time at 6 per cent will buy 
five houses and three lots that pay 
over 20 per cent net on the invest- 
ment 512 Burrows building. 



FOR SALE — NEW TWELVE- ROOM 
house; hardwood floors; double lot; 
Piedmont avenue; price $3,000; terms. 
E. H. Hobe, 10 Fifth avenue west. 



FOR SALE — AM LEAVING CITY; 
must sell my home. Tenth avenue 
east: cash or terms; act quick. L 532, 
Herald. 



FOR SALE— MUST BE SOLD— NINE- 
room dwelling, located in West end; 
water, sewer and gas; $2,550. Cor- 
porate Investment company, Torrey 
building. 




FOR SALE— NEW MODERN SEVKN- 
room house at Lakeside; cheap If 
taken at once; owner leaving. J 128, 
Herald. 



PERSONAL. 

PERSONAL — Frivate home for ladies 
before and during confinement; ex- 
pert care; everything confidential; 
infants cared for. Ida Pearson, M. 
D., 284 Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 



PERfeONALr— WANTED TO LOAN— $300 
or $400 on interest, from thirty to 
ninety davs; will furnish good se- 
curity. Write F 373, Herald. 



PER.«ONAL — SEWING WANTED AT 
6 Bast Fourth street, upstairs. 



PERSONAI^— PAINTING AND PAPER- 
hanging. Zenith 'phone 1518-'X. C. 
Gill. 



W'ANTED— PIANO FOR ITS KEEPING 
by two young ladies; will give best 
of care. A 209, Herald. 



Wringer Repairing. Interstate Mer- 
cantile Co., 1627 W. Sup. St. Zen. 787. 



PERSONAL — Old Mirrors Resilvered. 
St. Germain Bros,, 121 First Ave. W. 



PERSONAL — Foot Specialist; corns ex- 
tracted, 25c; inverted nails and bun- 
ions cured. Scott, 17 East Sup. .St. 



Personal — Manicuring, massage, scalp 
treatment. 813 Torrey. 'Phone 946-X. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

MRS. HANSON, GRADUATE MID- 
wife; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east. Old 'phone 1594; Zenitli 
1225. 



Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife; pri- 
vate hospital. 329 North Fifty- 
eighth avenue west. Zenith 3173. 



MISS SOPHIE WAROE, NURSE AND 
midwife, 2316 West First street. 
Zenith 'phone 1205. 



MRS. MARY BARREL. Nurse; private 
hosoitai for ladies before and during 
confinement 823 East Third street. 
Old ':»hone 2541-L. 



MRS. ANNA RONGE —GRADUATE 
midwife, 2018 West Superior street. 
Zenith 'phone 1894-D. 



For ladies through confinement; nurse 
and i>hysician; infants cared lor. 
Lock box 11. Champlain, Minn. 



Oct. 18, 

Andrew 
retary. 



MA.SONIC. 
PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 79,^ 
A, F. & M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month, at 
7:30 o'clock. Next meeting 
1909. Work — Second degree; 
C. Volk, W. M.; H. Nesbit, sec- 




degree. 
Hugh B 




William 
Richeux, 



KEYSTONE CHAPTER, NO. 
20. R. A. M. — Stated convo- 
cations second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at "7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting Wednesday, Oct. 27, 
1909. Work — M. M. degree, 

D. Underhill, H. P.; Alfred Le 

secretary. 



A 



15, 1909. 
ters and 
dalla W. 
Richeux, 



DULUTH COUNCIL, NO. 6, R. 
& S. M. — Regular meetings 
first and third Friday even- 
ings of each month at 7:30 
o'clock. Next meeting Oct. 

Work — Royal and select mas- 
super-excellent degrees. An- 

Torrance, T. I. M. ; Alfred Le 
recorder. 




Cross 
Alfred 




DULUTH COMMANDERY NO. 
18, K. T. — Stated conclave 
first Tue&dav of each month 
at 7:30 o'clock. Next con- 
clave will he held Tuesday, 
Oct 19, 1909. Work — Red 

degree. C. E. Peaslee, E. C; 

Le Richeux, recorder. 

SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR 
meetings every Thursday 
evening at 8. Next meeting 
Oct. 14. 1909. Work— Regular 
business. J. E. Cooley, sec- 
retary. 



Zenith CHAPTER. NO. 25. 
Order of Eastern Star. — Reg- 
ular meetings second and 
iCk fourtli Friday evenings of 
each montli at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting Oct. 22, 1909. 
W^ork — Worthy matron's nlglit. ballot- 
ing and Initiation. Gertrude Bates, W. 
M. ; Ella F. Gearhart, secretary. 



EUCLID LODGE, NO. 198, A. 
F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting Oct. 13, 1909. Work 
degree. Martin J. Murray, 
. Dunleavy, secretary. 




Y~ 




— Second 
W. M.; A 




DULUTH CHAPTER, NO. 59, 
R. A. M. — Meets at West Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
days of eacli month at 7:30 
u. m. Next meeting C>ct. 6. 
'VN'ork — Royal arch degiee. 

W. B. Getchell. H. 1'.; A. Dunleavy, 

secretary. 

Dl'LUTH LODGK, NO. 28. I O. O. F.— MKET8 

e\ery Friday evenl.-ig i.t Odil t'tllowV 
hall, 18 l.iikp avenue rn'rth. Nt-xt niettiiig 
Oct. 1,"). Wcrk — Scccinl ilesrse. W. H. 

Konkler. noble grand; Kilwin A. Bcrgs'rvm. Jtec. 

Sic; A. H. Paul. Fin. See. 




K. O. T. M. 
DVLl'TH TI:NT no. 1 MEKTS KVKRY 
W«lncftlay, 8 15 p. na., at Miioi.ibee 
hall, ra West Klrsl sirtet. VisiUng 
members always welcome. A. J. AuUer- 
son. couimandir, 601 East Kounh ctrcet; 
J. H. Gellne.iu, record Kefjwr, oltice In 

hall. Hours, 10 a. in. lo 1 p. m., daily; Ztidxh 

phone O'Jl-X. 



A. O. U. W. 

FiDEtirv i.oik;e no. ioj — meets 

at Maccal*e hall. 224 West F:rst Btreet, 
e\«ry 'lliuisday at b p. m. Vicitiiie mtm- 
bers welcome. G'ist Uiihlin. .\I. W. ; 
A. K. FUrinc nroniir; O. J. Murvuid, 
finar.fler. 217 East KlfUi ttreet. 

I. O. F. " 

COl'IST CO.M.MEnCE. NO. 3283, INDE- 
litiiileiit Order if Forestirs. meets flrel 
and third Friday evening? at 8 o'cluck 
at liiwley's hall. 112 Wert F;r^t ulrcct. 
Next regular meeting. Friday, Oct. IJlii, 
I'.ii'.'. C. A. Carlson, C. 11. O. ; W. 
Uui pes, U. S. 





MOOEHN SAMARITANS. 
ALPHA cot Nt'lL NO. 1 — MEETS AT 
F( rctt^i-s' hall. First street and Fourtli 
aveiuie west vwiy nn:rsd.".y evening at ft 
o'clock. Btncflcn.t degree first and third 
Tlinrsday-i. .Sam;;rllan degree .see< i.il and 
fourtli Thursdays. A. Nelncn. G. S. ; 
Lucy M. Purdy. h. G. S. T. A. (Jail, financial scriLe, 
501 First National Uniik luilldlnp; Wallace P. Wel- 
Uanks. Ecrllie. All .Samiirlta-is invltetl. 





urer. 



U.MTEU OllDEJt OF FORESTERS — 

Nrr.h Star, No. ii>. meets every second 
and fourth M; ndays at V. O. F. hall. 
;-om(r Fourth axtnue Wft,t and First 
street. M. M Bain, C. «.. 2 <Jslx)n.e 
l)lock; E. M. Stewart, secretarj, 22i 
Third avenue west; H. B. Young, treat- 
Wist Third sirct. 1(;<2-K old phone. 




treasurer, 

2078-Y. 



U.NIT1:D ORDER OF FORK.STERS— 

Court Eastern Star. No. 86. meets everj 
first and third Tuejidays at U. O. F. 
hall, ciriier Fourth avenue west auiL 
First street. A. L. Foster. C. R., 107 
liist Ninth stntt' C. E. Paul, secretary,. 
3 West Superior street; H;iriy Mllnes, 
Room 28, , Wiuthrup bluck. ZeinlU plioiifr 



,M. W. A. 
IMPERIAL CAMP NO. 2206 — MEKT» 
at U. O. F. hall Fourth avenue west 
and First street, *eociid and fiuitlk 
Tuesd'tys of each month. 

F. E. Dcremus, consul. 

C. P. Eari. lierk, IJox 411. 





NORTH STAR LODGE NO. 35. K. of P. 

— Mens eviry Tuesday evening at K. of 
P. hall, 118 West Superior stft'et. Next 
nveethig. Tuesday, (K-t. 19. W: ric— Seeind. 
rank. All knights cordially invited. Lcuii 
l>vv( r^bak, C. C. : L. L. Sparks, K. ot. 
R. it H. 



CLAN STT':WAHT. NO. 50. O. S. C. — 

Meets first and third Wednesdays each 
mi'Uth. 8 p. m.. at t'. O. F. hall, ccrnit 
Fourth iivei i:e we«it and First street.. 
Next regular nicitiiig Ott. 20. Alexander 
G. McKidght clilef: Don McLennan, sec- 
retary; John Uunictt, ilnaucial secre- 
tary, 812 Tcrrey building. 





ROYAL LEAGUE. 

ZF^MTH COrNCIL. .NO. 161, ROTAU 
1.1 ague — .Mtttg In K. P. lu,U flrst and 
third Monday eveniiigs at 8 o'cidk. G. 
L. Hargra\<H, tcribe. care of Ncrtlicm. 
Shoe company; W. W* Booth, arcl»cn, 
care of Marshall- Wells. 




WOOD.MEN Of THE WORLD. 
ZENITH CITY CAMP. NO. 5.— MEETS 
eviry tecond and fourth Wednesdays at- 
tlie old .Mag nlc temple, fifth floor. Mac- 
.\uky, C. C, 102 West .Mlclilgan street; 
J. H. iJtTMn. banker. 122 East Superior 
strut- Robin Fonsyth. clirk. 817 East 
Second street. 




ZENITH CITY TENT NO. 1044. KNIGUTS- 
of the Modem Maccabee*— Metts every 

second and fourth Friday evinlngs ef each 
month in .Maccaljee Imll. 224 West First 
stnet. C. R. Fossett. riimraander; C. K. 
lyx mis, R. K.. 1030 West First streti. 
SJenlth phone 2243- Y. 



ROYAL ARCANUM, Duluth Council, No. 
148."!— Meets first and tlilrd Friday even- 
ings, knights of PjUiias hnll. Cilntoo 
Brooks, secretary, 401 Columbia building. 
Mesaba Council. No. 1943— Meets first 
and third WVlncsdav evenhigs. ColumU* 
hall. We«t end. A. M. Johiisca. seci«- 
tary, 117 North Twmtleth a*eHue we«t. 





ORDER OF OWLS, DULUTH 

Nest, No. 12)1. will niett fint 
ar.rt third Fridays of e.ich 
month. Nrx; mieting. 0<t. lotli, 
EagifS" haU. JtsepU E. Peaks 
KCtretary, 32 Eatt Superior sireo! 



C 



IONIC UDDGE, NO. 186, A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meeting* *• 

second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month &X ^ ^ 
7:30 o'clock. Next meeting 
Oct. 25, 1909. Work— Third 
Clarence B. Miller, ■V^^ M. ; 
urgo, secretary. 



nr^mrtsm 



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SECTION 1 1 DULUTH F.VENING HERAL 




■^T-TTi--r* ;- 



TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR. 



LAST EDITIOIV 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1909. 



PRESIDENTS OF 
SISTER NATIONS 
SET PRECEDENT 



M and Diaz Meet and E<-||||{£MORIAL 

change Courtesies of 
Republics. 



Thousands Gather at Border 

of Countries to Attend 

Ceremonies. 



Formal and Impressive Mili- 
tary Spectacle Marks 
the Meeting. 



FUND GROWS 






'£yini^n^j§3^iSSiSCi<^ac^:i^s:s!^c;2 



Contributions to the Johnson 
Memorial Started To- 
ward $1,000. 

St. Louis County, Outside of 

Buluth, Has Made Good 

Showing. 



El Paso. Tex.. Oct. 16.— With cannon 
roaring a sequence of salutes, with 
soldiers everywhere, and a pomp of 
ceremony seldom, !f ever before, wit- 
nessed in this country. President Taft 
of the United States and Porfirlo Diaz, 
who for years has ruled over the des- 
tinies of Mexico as president of that 
great Southern repuhlic. met today and 
e.xdianged formal greeting of good 
will and friendship. 

The meeting took place behind closed 
doors. In the directors' room of the 
Cliamber of Commerce building, and 
only two assistant secretaries to I'resi- 
dent Taft were present to report tlie 
addresses i>f tlie executives. 

After having received President Diaz 
on American soil. President Taft him- 
self crosstd the international border 
line and returned the c;ill of President 
Diaz at the customs house in tlie quaint 
little city of Ciudad Jaurez. Again 
the two presidents were closeted for a 
few mlnute-s and I'residt^nt Diaz re- 
paid the hospitable courtesies which 
had been extended to him while he 
was a guest of the American people. 
Will VlMlt Dial AsaiB. 

President Taft returned to the United 
States to review a miliiary parade in 
this city this afternoon. Tonight, how- 
ever he will cross into Mexico for the 
second time to be the guest of Presi- 
dent Diaz at Jaurcz. 

i:umors of a possible demonstration 
attending the meeting of th.e two presi- 
dents caused the autlioritits. both civil 
and militarv. to take extra precau- 
tions on this side of the Rio Grande 
for guarding the life of President 
Diaz, and caused a similar alertness 

(Continued on pa ge 5. fif th column) 

captTcody has 
narrow escape 

American Aviator's Aero- 
plane Is Wrecked During 
FUght in England. 

Doncaster, Eng., Oct. 16. — Disaster 
for the biplane of Capt. Cody, the 
American, and a miraculous escape 
from death for the aviator himself, 
furnished a sensational opening for 
the second day of aviation week. 

The weather was ideal for flying. 
After some experimental work, -Cody 
started on a flight and had traveled 
a thousand yards when, takins? a cor- 
ner at great speed, the front wheel 
touched the ground and the machine 
toppled over with a crash. Cody 
pitched forward in the midst of the 
wreckage. 

As ambulance atendants came up, 
Cody crawled from the huge jumble 
of broken bamboo rods and tangled 
wires, unhurt save for a gash in the 
free The biplane presented a sad 
appf^arance. The engine escaped and 
the planes were not greatly damaged, , 
but the other parts were so badly 
wrecked that several days will be re- 
quired for repairs. 

CRISlNEAR 
IN NICARAGUA 



Brother of Rehel President 

Is Advancing on the 

Capital. 

Revolutionary Movement Is 
Spreading— Wild Con- 
fusion Prevails. 



The Johnson Memorial Fund today 
stands as follows: 

Previously acknowledged $900.60 

Received up to noon today.... 24.00 




TWO! C«W*MSOTA 

tJfllCAL 

OIETY. 




WORLD HONORS 
BASEBALL ARE AT 
STAKE IN DETROIT 






RUMOR SAYS 
KINGB^DEAD 

Alfonso Said to Have Been 

Killed But Report Is 

Unconfirmed. 

Ferrer Demonstrations Are 

Causing Riots in Many 

Cities. 



Tigers and Pirates Prepare 

for Decidmg Struggle in 

the Series. 







Total to date. 



.$924.60 



Tlie Johnson memorial fund in Du- 
luth now has a good start toward the 
$1,000 mark. But two weeks more are 
left in which to complete the fund of 
$25,000 desired by the state commis- 
sion, and Duluth's contribution should 
reach at least $1,500. If only a small 
number of those in Duluth who intend 
to aid in the erection of a statue of 
the late governor of the state capltol 
will send In their subscriptions before 
Monday noon to The Herald office, the 
local fund will exceed $1,000, and the 
additional sura desired here may be 



SHARP WORDS FLY AT TAH 
DINNER AT ALBUQUERQUE 



SEVEN KILLED IN 
MEXICAN MINE 



(.Continued on page 5, Hfth column) 

NORTH AND SOUTH 
MEET ON GRIDIRON 

Princeton and the Sewanee 
Tigers WiB Rub Mole- 
skins in Strife. 

Princeton, N. J., Oct. 16. — Unusual in- 
terest has been attached to the foot- 
ball game here today between Prince- 
ion and the team from the University 
of the South, of Sewanee, Tenn., better 
known as tlie "Sewanee Tigers," who 
many times have won the gridiron 
championship of the South. Not only 
because of the football reputation 
which preceded the Sewanee team here, 
but hecau.se of a perplexing slump by 
the Princeton team, today's contest 
was looked upon as one of the niost 
important games of the sclsedule. The 
visitors traveled 1,200 miles to play 
Princeton in wliat is really the first 
game of anv importance between rep- 
resentative teams of the North and 

South. . , » J 

Coach Copey of Sewanee said today 
that his men were in good condition 
for the fray, and that although a light 
team as a whole, the players were last 
and agile. For the first time this sea- 
son. Princeton will today use her 
strongest lineup. A curious thing 
about the game is the fact that the 
captains of the opposing teams both 
hall from the same state— South Caro- 
lina. 

GET MORE PELTS 

FROM ROOSEVELT. 



INDIANS PLAYING 
SYRACUSE TEAM 

Carlisle Will Meet the Fast 

Eleven From Up State 

University. 

New York, Oct. 16. — A large crowd of 
football enthusiasts journeyed to the 
Polo grounds today to witness the only 
gridiron contest of importance, which 
Xe%v York will have an opportunity of 
attending on home ground this season. 
The contestants in todays game are 
the Carlisle school Indians and the 
fast eleven representing tlie Syra- 
cuse university. The latter are not ex- 
pected to win, but promise to put up 
a stiff game. 

SURVEY ON HlbsON RAY 

LINE TO BEGIN MONDAY. 

■Winnipeg, Man., Oct. 16. — A gang of 
seventy-five surveyors left here last 
niglit for Pass Mission on the Sas- 
katcliewan river, fi-om which point 
they will begin Monday to locate a 
line to Hudson bay. The surveyors ex- 
pect to work all winter. 



Statehood Question Brings Gut 

Tilt Between Guest 

and Hosts. 



Mullin and Adams Picked as 
Pitchers for the Cru- 
cial Battle. 



Albuquerque, N. M., Oct. 16— In the 
closing minutes of the banquet which 
was tendered to him here laut night, 
Frtsident Taft took occasion to rebuke 
some local speakers who had made 
some rather testy remarks on the sub- 
ject of statehood. 

They had expressed some doubt 
whether the Republican party really 
meart to grant stilch<>od»-io New Mex- 
ico and Arizona, despite the earnest 
declaration the pretident Vad made on 
that subject in an earlie speech here 
during tiie afternoon. -. "i^^iy had ar- 
gued and harangued for two liours, 
while the president sat patitntly lis- 
tening Then he arose and declared 
he was like a judge he onoe knew, 
who, at the end of a long argument by 
counsel, remarked: 

"Mr. Wolfe, in spite of your argu- 
ment, I am still with you." 

Speaker Is Bitter. 

A. B. Fall, formerly aitorne:-- general 
of the territory, was one of the speak- 
ers. He said New Mexico miglit "pos- 
siblv" be admitted, now that the Re- 
publican party had entered Into a "con- 
tract on the subject." 

"For." he asserted in ringing tones, 



(Continued on page 5, sixth column) 



Fifteen Others Are Injured in 

Runaway Car at La 

Esperanzas. 

New York, Oct. 16. — A dispatch re- 
ceived at t!ie Mexican Coal & Coke 
company's offices in this city today re- 
ports an accident at the company's 
mine, No. 1, near La Esperanzas, Mex. 
Seven men were killed and fifteen seri- 
ously injured. The men were in a mine 
car, which ran away. 

MRS. TAFT BACK 
AT WIM HOUSE 

Is Much Benefited by Her 

Sununer on the Atlantic 

Coast 

Washington, Oct. IC.— Much benefited 
by her summer sojourn on the Massa- 
chusetts coast, Mrs. William H. Taft, 
who was in poor health when she left 
here early in the summer, reached the 
White House from Beverly, Mass., to- 
dav. 



London, Oct. 16. — There Is no confir- 
mation whatever here of a rumor tele- 
graphed from Paris that King Alfonso 
had been assassinated. 

Buried in m Ditch. 

Barcelona, Oct. 16.— The relatives of 
Prof. Ferrer were permitted to follow 
ihe hodv to the grave, l^^lay in an 
open cotfin, according to the Spanish 
custom. Bullet holes were visible In 
the foieliead. The authorities refused 
to permit interment to be made in a 
private grave, and buried the body In a 
common ditch. Permission was granted 
the family, however, to mark the spot 

Four courts-martial are sitting here. 
Among the cases on trial are those of 
three Frenchmen and a French woman, 
wiio are accused of participation In the 
burning of the convent of Geronimos. 
Twelve persons were wounded today by 
an explosion of a bomb in Obispo 
street. 

BoinbM tn Barcelona. 

Paris, Oct. 16.— The Matins Barce- 
lona correspomlent says that a bomb 
was exploded yesterday at the Ro.?er 
De Flor barracks on the spot where 
the captain general would have stood 
at an Inspection of the troops. Several 
soldiers, he adds, were seriousiy In- 

Another bomb, the third of the day. 
was found in the Plaza Ankel at Barce- 
lona. It had not been exploded. 

A bomb was exploded early yester- 
day In the street fronting the bishop s 
palace. Flying pieces of the metal 



Washington, Oct. 16.— Twenty more 
casks containing the skins of ani- 
mals killed by ex-President Roosevelt 
have arrived here. It Is however, im- 
possible to ascertain the different 
pelts contained In the casks, as the 
invoice has not yet been received at 
the Smithsonian institution. 



^ 'LONG 'BOUT THIS TIME O'YEAR. i 



£tf-)NHMB!HNt**^NHMt**^Hj^^ m'*^)t^t* t****'M***ttt* **t* * t-t'if''f**^^*m^ 



FIND STOLEN 
LITTLE ONES 

Chicago Pohce Discover Chil- 
dren Abducted From 
St. Louis. 




(Continued o n page^ 5. sevent h column) 

LAUNCH PARH 
IS ALL RIGHT 

After Buffeting About on 

Leech Lake for Day 

Reaches Haven. 

Walker, Minn., Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Tidings from the miss- 
ing launch Sarah L., which has been 
absent from its dock since early last 
Sunday, Avas brought in this morning 
by the steamer Northland, which was 
stationed at headquarters camp, twen- 
ty-five miles from Walker. After 
weathering the storm for nearly a day 
the party managed to reach the camp, 
with no real damage done, except the 
swamping of the rowboats, and liave 
remained in the harbor there, wait- 
ing for the storm to abate. 

Luckily the camp was occupied, and 
none of the four ladies among the 
party suffered from exposure. The Sa- 
rali L. is due to return this afternoon. 



Men Injured Thursday Back 

for More Prowess on 

the Diamond. 



Detroit, Mich.. Oct. 16.— What Is ex- 
pected would be the largest crowd tha| 
ever saw a baseball game in Detroit 
began pouring into Bennett park early 
today to witness the seventh and no 
doubt the decisive game of tiie world's 
championship series between Pittsburg 
and Detroit. The weather was cold, 
with the thermometer registering be- 
tween 35 and 40 dtgs. above zero. Th© 
sky was clear, altliougli the weather 
forecast promised snow flurries. 

The majority of the crowd tliat went 
to Bennett park appeared confident 
of an ultimate victory tor the Amer- 
ican league champions. Many wagera 
were made at even money, and several 
were recorded with Detroit a slight 
favorite at 4 to 6 or 9 to 10. 
Mullin May Pttcb. 
George ,Mullin, the hero of the 
series in the eyes of the Detroit sup- 
porters, was confidently expected to be 
the choice of Manager Jennings as the 
man to pitch the crucial game. The 
day was too cold for Donovan. Mul- 
lin's work in the series has made him 
one of Detroit's greatest heroes. 

Manager Clarke refused to make any 
definite announcement concerning hia 
selection for the Pittsburg pitcher, but 
it was tliouglit almost certain Adama 
would pitch. 

The three Detroit players who were 
injured in the ninth Inning of Thurs- 
day's game were all in the lineup dur- 
ing the morning piactlce. 

Injured Men Bacic^ Aarniu. 
Tom Jone.s was apparently none the 
worse for his collision with Wilson, 
and worked as snappily around first 
as ever, irchmidt was back of homo 
and showed no effects of the spiking 
he had rec-Mved, while Moriarity's sore 
knee did not appear to cause him any 
trouble. 

The reguhir Pittsburg nine also was 
on tbe field and practiced In brilliant 
style. The lineup: 



Pittsburs:. 

Byrne, 3b. 
Lfach, cf. 
Clarke, If. 
Wagner, ss. 
Miller. 2b. 
Abstein, lb. 
Wilson, rf. 
Gibson, c. 
Adams, p 



Detroit. 

D. Jones, If. 
Bush, 6S. " 
Cobb, If. 
Crawford, cf. 
Delehanty 2b. 
Moriarity, 3b. 
T. Jones, lb 
Schmidt, c. 
Mullin. p. 



(1) Just because a fellow intends to keep on sleep- 
ing outdoors — 



(2) And taking his cold plunge every morning — 



New Orleans. La., Oct. 16.— A dis- 
patch from Blueflelds. Nicaragua, says: 

••It is reported here that Gen. Aurello 
Estrada, elder brother of the man who 
has been proclaimed president, has 
landed a force of insurgents on the 
shore of Lake Nicaragua, and Is mov- 
ing toward tbe capital. Several towns 
on the shores of the lake have been 
occupied by the revolutionists. Seri- 
ous fighting Is expected soon In the 
vicinity of Managua. 

The revolutionary movement Is 
spreading rapidly In Nicaragua, and the 
wildest confusion prevails throughout 
tlie country. Thousands of people are 
flocking to the standard of Gen. Es- 
trada, and the revolutionary leaders 
now have a formidable array. The 
revolutionary government today re- 
ceived advices tiiat the revolt had ex- 
tended to lh<» western coast of Nic- 
aragua. 



Fathers Say No Ransom Was 

Paid- Have Clue to 

Kidnapers. 



Chicago, Oct. 16. — Tommaso and 
Grace Vivlano, the St. Louis children 
who were stolen from their homes at 
St. Louis Aug. 2. were again clasped 
in the arms of their respective fathers 
here today. 

The brothers, who are men of wealth, 
in an interview with the police before 
proceeding to the Passavent hospital, 
where their children spent the night, 
declared that no ransom had been paid. 
The only money which they spent in 
the case was to assist in the search, 
tney declared. Both osserted that they 
would bend every nergy to run down 
the kidnapers, of whom there are be- 
lieved to have been several. 
Clue io Kidnapeni. 

A clue whicli may prove of value in 
connection with the vague informa- 
tion secured from the children was fur- 
nished today by John Kay burn, for- 
merlv a railroad policeman. Kayburn 
identified the children as the same 
ones he had seen on a Wabash train. 

(Continued on page 6, sixth column) 




DYNAMITE IN 
UQUORFIGHT 

Head of Ohio Prohibition As- 
sociation Victim of 
Attacks. 



dams, p. MuiiiM. y. 

Umpires — O'Loughlin, Evans, John- 
stone and Klem. 

HASKELL'S PLEA 
DENIED BY COURT 

Federal Judge Refuses to 
Quash Indictments in Mus- 
kogee Case. 

Ardmore, Okla., Oct. 16. — Federal 
Judge Marshall has overruled the de- 
fendants' motion to quash the indict- 
ments charging Governor Haskell and 
other Oklahomaus with fraudulently 
scheduling town lots In Muskogee, 
Okla. 



(:?) Keeping plenty of fresli air in the office during 
working hours — 



(1) 
fall — 



Wearing his atliletic underwear till late in the 




Home and Business Plant 

of D. B. Gary Damaged 

at Zanesville. 



Zanesvllle, Ohio, Oct, 16.— Dynamite 
explosions early today damaged the 
residence of D. B. Gary and the factory 
of the Zanesvllle Furniture company. 

Mr. Gary is president of the Civic 
league, which has been actively en- 
gaged in the prosecution of liquor 
cases before Mayor Campbell of New 
Concord. Fifty-six cases have been 
tried, and a conviction obtained in 
each case. , . , , 

At the Gary home the kitchen was 
blown up just as Mrs. Gary was about 
to enter it. She Is prostrated from 
the shock. 

The damage amounts to several thou- 
sand dollars. 



AVON BANK 
SAFEBLOWN 

Burglars Get Away With 

$1J00 From Steams 

County Town. 

Escape by fiSeans of Stolen 

Team and Board Freight 

Train. 



Avon. Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Three robbers entered 
the Bank of Avon early today and 
blew open the safe. They secured 
$1,700, stole a team of horses and drove 
to the village of Holdingford, where 
they boarded a freight train on the 
Soo railroad and made their escape. 



(5) Hanging around the football games without an 
overcoat — 



(•3) Guess lie can change his mind if he wants to, 
Can't he? 




SEBALL EXTRA 



The Story of thcDclroit-Pltlsburg Game 

Will Be Told in The Herald's 

Baseball Extra Tonight. 





' 




! 


. < 


<l 




















' 






-» 






< 




1 



-4 




THE DtFLVTH EVENING HER'ALD: SATURDAY, OdTOBER 16, 1909. 



WFJITHER— Partly clotkly weather tonisht 
aiu) Sunday: not much chu^g* lii teiup.;r- 
aiiire; mixlente wiii(i«. protkibir shlfUnj to 
ea^ttrijr tonlglU. 



KNOX 




yjTV YORJC. 

World-R.enofirned 

HATS 

WE ALONE SELL THEM. 




SUPERIOR ST. AT FOURTH AVE. \V. 




rHIS new Civil War 
novel by a master 
story-teller is one of 
the big Fall books — one 
of the kind that every- 
body will urge you to 
read. Pictures in color. 



AT ALL BOOKSTORES 



ihe South 

By RANDALL PARRISH 

A. C. McCLURG & CO. 

PUBLISHERS 






w^^ 



BUY FROM 
THE MAKER 

And save the middlcman'i 
profit on Trunks. 



DULUTB TRUNK CO. 

220 W. Superior Street. 



Palace of Sweets 

We manufacture the very best 
Chocolates and Bon Bona. We have 
our own factory and guarantee sat- 
isfaction. Our candies are fresh 
every day. 

Fancy bo.xes of best candy put 
up to order. 

Bitter Sweets and Caramels that 
are delicious. 

Hot Drink.* Served. 

13 EAST SI PKUIOK ST. 

WILLIAM BRANTZ, Prop. 



BEST FRUIT PB0P8SITI0N 

At last people are waking up to 
the enormous proflt.? of fruit-grow- 
ing under proper (conditions. No- 
where else is tlie business so profit- 
able as on the Isle of Pines. No 
frost, no irrigation, cheap trans- 
portation, an ideal climate. 

Prices aie higher, of course, than 
last year, but are still very, very 
low. A 10-acre grove in bearing 
means an independent Income for 
life. 

Ten acras. |500: 20 acres, Jl.OOO; 
40 acres. $2,000. Easy terms. 

SHIPRERD & CHANDLER, 

UOO Manhattan BIdK. 



GAME FIGHT 
FOR HER LIFE 

Little 13-Year-Old Girl Is 
Battling With Con- 
sumption. 

Slept Out of Doors When 

the Snow Covered 

Her. 



The story of the nerviest tubercular 
patient in the city was told at the 
city hall this morning by Mrs. Flor- 
ence Lee, tuberculosis nurse. 

During the storm the early part of 
the week, she says a 13-year-old girl, 
who has been making a determined 
fight against the great white plague, 
refused to sleep indoors. Refusing 
to listen to the entreaties of her par- 
ents, the brave child crept into her 
little outdoor shanty, built on top of 
the kitchen at the rear of her home, 
and bundled herself in the blankets. 

That was early Monday night. At 
4 o'clock Tuesday morning her father, 
unable to control his anxiety longer, 
went to see how she was getting along. 
Although her window opens directly 
into the outside refuge, where she has 
been sleeping, the little girl was still 
there. She was covered with snow, 
and despite her protests her father 
carried her inside and absolutely re- 
fused to allow her to return that 
night. 

Every night since she has braved 
the inclement weather and slept in 
the small wooden and canvass struc- 
ture perched above the ground. Mrs. 
Lee s<iys that the girl has made 
splendid progress in the battle which 
she has been waging and in com- 
paratively short time expects to see 
her fuUv recovered. 

The girl has learned to take her 
own temperature, which she does 
every day, and if any change for the 
worse is shown by her readings, she 
takes prompt steps to bring her tem- 
perature to normal again. 

• 

Don't complain about cost of living. 
Barthe-Martin sell groceries at whole- 
sale. 



TRI-STATE AND 
MEETING DATES 




Annual Gathering With Other 

Meetings at Fargo 

Jan. 18-21. 

Fargo, N. D.. Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.')— The dates for the Trl- 
.State Grain and Stock Growers' con- 
vention have been fixed for Jan. 18-21. 
It will be the eleventh annual meeting, 
and an interesting program will be pre- 
pared, with speakers of national repu- 
tation. The meetings have come to be 
rega'-ded as the leading assemblage.s 
of the farmers of the Northwest, and 
draw from both Dakotas and Minne- 
sota. 

Thf> second annual corn show will 
also be held the same week. The effort 
was ."^uch a success last year that the 
demand was pronounced. Corn grown 
bv the pupils of the state di.'Jtrict 
schools as well as by farmers will be 
entered. 

The North Dakota Poultry associa- 
tion gives a show the same week. 

The first bench show ever held in the 
state under the American Kennel club 
rules will be given at the same time 
under the auspices of the North Da- 
kota Kennel association. A prominent 
Kasiern judge will officiate, and lead- 
ing breeders have arranged to make 
entries. 

HERDER HAS WON 
TO PROMINENCE 



Works Way Through College 

and Quahhes for High 

Position. 

Fargo, N. D., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The case of William It. 
Lanxon. a graduate of the North Da- 
kota Agricultural college last summer, 
is an Inspiration to the young men of 
the Northwest. Lanxon came to the 
college seven or eight years ago as a 
herder on the experimental farm. He 
became imbued with a desire for an 
education and started to take one of 
the strongest courses. 

It took him about seven years to 
complete his work and earn his way. 
He graduated with honor, represented 
his institution in the oratorical con- 
tests and was prominent in other 



BEWARE OF COLDS 



FbOB" DUNN NOT A CANDIDATE 



REPORTS THAT HE WILL NOT OPPOSE EBERHART FOR THE 



L 



NOMINATION FOR GOVERNOR. 



J 



St Paul. Minn., Oct 16. — The Pioneer 
Press says: Reports are to the effect 
that Bob Dunn of Princeton realizes 

that there Is no use fighting for the 
nomination for governor next year, and 
that he '« not considering being a can- 
didate next year at least. A politician 
from a county nortli- of here, who was 
in St. Paul yesterday, .said that Dunn 
had told him a few days ago that "the 
stuff's off," and that he will not con- 
sider being a candidate under the pres- 
ent circumstances. 

It is perhaps ten years or more since 
Dunn began flunking of being govern- 
or, and his defent by .Johnson five years 
ago did not take him out of the field 
of possibilities. He has always been 
considered a possibility, and during 
the pa.at summer he visited the gov- 
ernor's office several times, in an ef- 
fort to determine whether Johnson 
would run a fourth time. If he could 
iiave been assured that Johnson would 
in no wi.'-'^ be on the ticket, most likely 
Dunn would have tried for tht nom- 
ination next year. As long as Johnson 
was a fourth tei m possibility, Dunn 
kept out. When Kberhart came into 
t!ie chair, and when C. S. Mitchell was 
considered for private secretary and 
tiirntd it down, It was supposed thaf 
Dunn was preparing for a figlit. 

Dunn has good friends and advisers 
and they probably kept him Informed 
of the sentiment of the people. The 
first lmpie.=sion of Lberhart was good, 
and without anyth.ing to change it, he 
would be the logical nominee of the 
partj' next year. Many of tlie Repub- 
licans, realizing that a fight in the 
party spelled defeat, were getting it\ 
line for Kberhart, and the present in- 
cumbent of the office had the inside 
track. Dunn was no doubt aware of 
this and realized that it would be futile 
for him, who had once led the party 
to defeat, to try now to make a fight 
for the nomination, for a nomination 
I tider those circumstances would mean 




ROBERT C. DUNN. 



almost certain defeat. So the active 
participation of the fomer state aud- 
itor in the next campaign will prob- 
ably be confined to making .spicy re- 
marks In the oolumns of the Princeton 
Up-ion. 



DR. FREDERICK A. 




-AT THE 



FIRST METHODfiST CHURCH 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 



23 



will tell of hia discovery of the 





With PHOTOGR.\PHS taken by himself of the TOP OF THE WORLD. 
PRICKS. $1.00, 91.50 A\D $2.00. 

Reserved .Sent Sale Oiiens Wednestdny at ChnqiJ^erlain & Taylor's. 




women;$ woes. 

Culufh Women Are Find- 
ing Relief at Last. 



It does seem that women have more 
than a fair share of the aches and 
pains that afflict humanity; they must 
"keep up," must attend to duties in 
spite of constantly aching backs, or 
headaches, dizzy spells, bearing-down 
pains; they must stoop over, when to 
stoop means torture. They must walk 
and bend and work with racking 
pains and many aches from kidney 
ills. Kidneys cause more suffering 
than any other organ of the body. 
Keep the kidneys well and health i.s 
easily maintained. Read of a remedy 
for kidneys only that helps and cures 
the kidneys and is indorsed by people 
you know. 

Mrs. W. F. Humerichous. 109 Twen- 
ty-.seventh avenue, Duluth, Minn., 
says: "For several years I was af- 
flicted with kidney trouble and the 
medicines I used did not help me. My 
back often ached severely and when I 



MAY NOT BE 



Latest Gossip Is That Dr. 

CuUum WiU Not Enter 

Race. 



Effort WiU Be Made to 
Find Another Can- 
didate. 



from 
effect 



There is a persistent rumor 

several sources today, to the 

that Dr. Marcus B. CuUum will not 

heed the call of many of his friends. 

After I and that he will not give his consent 



stooped, dizzy spells seized nie 

I had tfl'cen the contents of one box! to become a candidate for the Dem- 

of Doan's Kidney Pills, I felt so muchjocratic nomination in the forthcoming 

better that I procured a further sup- mayoralty campaign. 

ply. I am now free from backache, j^,. culluni remains silent on the 

and f^'^l.^better in every way. I ^o , ^^ ^^,^^^^^ ^.,^^ j^^^.^ 

not hesitate to recommend Doan s , , ,. . w ^i^ „ 

Kidney Pills in return for the benefit I urged hmi to announce his candidacy, 

they brought me." \^^ ^^^ refused to commit himself. 

For sale by all dealers. Price 50c.! The story that Dr. Galium will not 
Foster-Milburn Co.. Buffalo. N. Y., |be 
sole agents for the United States 



take no other. 



a candidate comes from several 
' men who are in close touch with the 

- ~" — r — .. ,,„„ T^/^o.,'a anilic'ty political situation. Both yester- 

Remember the name— Doan s— and ^^^. ^^^^ ^^^^^. ^^^^. expressed the be- 
lief that it would be Impossible to get 
Dr. Cullum to run. 

Should Dr. Cullum refuse to become 
a candidate for mayor on the Dem- 
ocratic ticket, there is no candidate in 
sight at the present time. Several 
names have been mentioned, but when 
workers in the party are asked, they 
state that they know of no man just 
at the present time, who is going to 
announce his candidacy. 

Even tho.se who have most stren- 
uously advocated the candidacy of Dr. 
Cullum, are at the present time doubt- 
ful of his becoming a candidate. It is 
said today that a quiet campaign is 
l)elng made, in the event of I>r. Cul- 
lum's refusing to permit his name to 
be used, to line up some other man for 
the race. 



branches of college life. Immediately 
on his graduation he was elected 
•I the farm school at 
Alexandria, Minn. This week he was 
elected superintendent of the hew 
sub-station to be started next spring 
at Hettinger, N. D. 



Sale Is Successful. 

The sale of 10-acre tracts at Wal- 
bridge. on the Wisconsin side of the 
t^t. LouLs river, at New Duluth. which 
is being conducted by Helmbaugii & 
Spring, of Superior, Wis., is proving 
very successful, in spite of the adverse 
v.eather conditions that prevailed the 
past week. A large number of people 
have visited the location and all but 
one made purchases. There are only 
twenty-four of these tracts for sale 
and the prices range from $250 to |400 
per acre. $25 cash and the balance in 
easv pivyraent each week. It is ex- 
pected tliat prospective purchasers will 
vl.slt Walbridge tomorrow. 



The VermillioD Iron DeveIopin*nt Co. 

Have opened offices at 316-317 Providence Bld«. Work 
on the properties v*iM commence at once. A shaft 
will be started un the Pint Island property and dia- 
mond drill on the Murray Homestead. Map. samples 
and blue prints can b« seen at our office. For further 
information address MR. TILTON E. LEWIS, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 



i/in 



turion. Shau#hneFsy, Scottish Hero. 11 
Howard Hanna, I>agcnda. Russell 
Northern Light, noon; Goulder, 12:30 
p. m.; Kennedy, 1; Lyman Smith, Mag- 
na, Maritana. 2; Leonard, 2:30; De 
Graff, Ishpeming. 3:30; McGean. Black 
Rock. W. W. Wawatam. Manitoba, 
Kotcher, 5:2'D; Superior Cltv, Hollev, 6; 
Phipps. Sill 7:30; Wade Berwick. 9:30; 
England. 10; M. C. Elphicke. Nasmyth, 
10:40; Murphy, 11; Buffalo. 11:30. 
Down: Mount Stephens. 12:30 p. m. ; 
Joshua Rhodes, Pere Marquette, North- 
ern Queen. ,1:30; H. M. Hanna. Baker. 
3; Capt Thomas Wilson, McKee. 3:30; 
Gilchrist. Sonora, 4:30; Kaministiqua, 
(steel) Wolf. Nicholas. 6; Crete, 7:30; 
Queen City. Moore, 8:30; Mueller. 9; 
L. C. Hanna, 9:30; Tionesta. Corona, 
10; F. C. Ball, 1:30; French. 11:30. 



BOATS ARE 

REPORTED SAFE 




PENNINGTON 
SAFE AT DETROIT 

Drifting Helplessly When 
Picked Up and Towed to 
kan Port. 



Steamers Are Still Straggling 
Into the Duluth 
: Harbor. 

While the arrivals at the port of 

Duluth are still light, it is believed 

that all the. boats that were out In the 
storm thaf^ raged over Lake Superior 
were successful in finding sheltering 
places. Most of the boats over which 
concern was felt have been reported 
at one port or another down the lakes 

One of the boats whloh was reporteci 
iXH missing in a special dispatch from 
the Soo last night was the big Wol- 
vin. This boat entered the harbor at 
Buffalo at 11:30 last night. She at 
once communicated with the Erie, Pa., 
wireless station,' and the message stat- 
ing that the vessel wt s safe was re- 
layed to' the Duluth station. Capt 
Vragie commands the V\'olvin. 

The steaitier Pere Marquette, over 
wlilch some anxiety was felt, has been 
reported as safe at Detroit. 

The W. E. Corey and C. S. Hebard 
are reported as being .«afe. 



BARGAINS 

III WOOLEN REMNANTS, 
Also L.ADIE.S' SKIRTS 

of all kinds. For sale at reasonable 
prices. 

28 W^ST FIRST STREET. 



Board of Health iHsueii W'arninK. 

The board of health has the danger 
sign out in big letters. Now is the 
time the doctor is kept busy and the 
undertaker roaps his harvest from 
those who do not heed the warning. 
It's the cough or cold we contract now 
that lingers on throughout the year, 
running down the system and often 
ending in death. The board of health 
and the best medical authorities state 
positively that the deaths from these 
causes are absolutely unnecessary. 

In view of the board of health's 
warning when we urge our readers to 
take "the stitch in time." A remedy 
like Salubrln, the great Swedish an- 
tiseptic, will absolutely prevent the 
danger from our changeable climate. 
Dr. P. Hakansson of the Royal Uni- 
versity of Lund, Sweden, and the lead- 
ing physicians, both here and abroad, 
say that Salubrln. if taken in time will 
have prompt effect on all diseases of 
the bronchial tubes and lungs. Indeed, 
so remarkable are the benefits of Sal- 
ubrin that the government of Sweden 
has removed all taxes on Its manufac- 
ture so that it might be universally 
used. The wonderful effects of Sal- 
ubrin on all coughs and colds of weak 
lungs and catarrh of the throat, nose 
and lungs, are now creating as great 
a sensation in scientific circles in this 
country as they have already done 
in Sweden. 

Salubrln sells for 50 cents per bottle, 
and every fhst class druggist is pre- 
pared to furnish it for home or pro- 
fessional use. 

For «ale and recommended In Dulutli by William 
A. Abl,v«. dnigglst. 129 West .Superior street. iJl 
W€^t Fourth stre.'t and 932 East Second «tre«t. 

Call at your dniggi.-in'i for a free .Salubrln Book- 
let <:t write Salulirtii l.4boratory 13, Salubrln Bldg.. 
tiraud Crossing. Cbica«o. 



Detroit. Mich., Oct. 16. — A Detroit 
News special from Sault Ste. Marie, 
Mich., says: 

The schooner B. L. Pennington of 
Tonawanda, N. Y., was towed Into this 
port by the tug Thompson yesterday 
after having drifted lielplessly in the 
storm on Lake Superior from Tuesday 
night until Thursday afternoon, with 
the crew every moment expecting their 
vessel to founder. 

The Pennington was In tow of the 
steamer Fleetwood of Tonawanda, 
which had also in tow, ahead of the 
Pennington, the schooner Moravia. At 
the height of the gale Tuesday night 
the Pennington broke away from the 
Moravia or was let go by the latter's 
crew off Whitefish point. Anchors were 
useless against the force of the storm, 
and the Pennington's steering gear 
gave way under the heavy strain 
placed upon it. The lighthouse tender 
Amaranth finally picked up the schoon- 
er, and the crew landed here little the 
worse for their experience. 



The Sault Passages. 

Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., Oct. 16. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Up Satur- 
day; P. E. White. Strathcona. 1:30 a.m.; 
J. E. Upson, 2:30: Midland. 3; Shenan- 
go. Frontenac, Weston. 4:30; Thomas. 
5:30; Princeton, Angeline. 6:30; Wi- 
nona Maunoloa, 7; Meacham. 7:30; La- 
gonda, A. B. Wolvln. 8; Adams. A. S. 
Upson. 9:30; Spalding, 10. Down: Ad- 
miral, S. Mather No. 1. 1 a. m.; C. S. 
Neff. 1:30; Cranage, Garretson, 2:30; 
Boshe, Pathfinder, Sagamore. 4; Wil- 
sen, 5; Kenora, Carnegie, Woodford, 
Gratwlck No. 1. 6; Saunders. Stewart. 
Mcintosh, 7:30; S. H. B. Morse, Lewis- 
ton. Bufflngton, 9; Umbria. 9:30; Fort 
Carrington. W. S. Mack. Colgate. Smith, 
Thompson, 11. Up Friday: Gates, Cea- 



Clement Aground. 

Detroit, Mich.. Oct. Hi. — The 450-foot 
freighter Clement of Cleevland ran 
aground yesterday in the ship channel 
in Lake St. Clair, just above the en- 
trance to the Detroit river, and. swing- 
ing acro.ss the channel, practically 
blocked traffic last night. 

Port of Duluth. 

Arrivals: New York, Armour, light 
for grain; Marlska, D. G. Kerr, Foster, 
coal; Empire City, Davock, light for 
ore. 

Departures: Empire City. Eads, Will- 
iam Livingstone, P. White. M. Taylor, 
ore; D. W. Mills. Anderson, Gettysburg. 
J. P. Donaldson. Dayton. lumber; 
Rochester, merchandise; F. B> Wells. 
New York. Laughlln, grain; John 
Mitchell, light. 

$10.(W Cash Prize. 

We will pay .$10 in g<)ld to the school 
boy or gii^l ^»he wrlte.j the best poem 
on Hiawatha Coffee, to reach us on or 
before Oct. 20. 1909. Neat and good 
writing will co-unt in the points. 

stone-ordp:an-wells co. 



Meetins In Xeiv York. 

New York. Oct. 16. — A meeting to de- 
nounce the e.xecutior of Francisco 
Ferrer, the ravolutioni.'U, at Barcelona, 
Spain, will be held In Carnegie hall on 
Tuesday night next under the auspices 
of the Internationa! L.a.bor conference. 
The conference was organized here 
some time ago. to lend help to work- 
men then engaged In general strikes 
in Spain an 1 .Sweden. It consists of 
100 labor Relegates ami delegates from 
all the Socialistic societies in New 
York city. 



Storm Sash and Dooi*s. 

Any slze.TTtaQe quickly to order. Tele- 
phone today 111. . Duluth Lumber Co. 



THE WEEK AT 

THE NORMAL 

People of This Age Read 

Too Much, Says Prof. 

Guthrie. 

Prof. William Norman Guthrie 
spoke to the normal students yester- 
day on the "Vital Study of I^iter- 
ature." 

"The main difficulty today,' he said, 
"lies in the fact that literature is not 
taught properlJ^ Literature is not 
brought into connection with real life. 
The average man has no comprehen- 
sion of what literature serves, and the 
pupils in high schools almost loathe 
it. This is due not to the incapacity 
of the student but rather to the way 
in which it is taught. The teacher 
cannot make the pupils love literature 
unless she her.self loves it, and is filled 
with its spirit. She is the infector, 
and through her the appreciation of 
literature is kindled. 

"They say literature cannot be 
taught. The trouble is that litera- 
ture is not a science and to teach it 
that way is not the aim and no good 
is accomplished. It is an art and 
can be taught only in creation. It 
can be taught only in production with 
a study of models. Literature is a 
body of artistic construction and an 
appreciation of it should begin with a 
child of 6. 

"One method used in teaching liter- 
ature is the historical method, which 
consists of learning biographies and 
dates. This is nothing but a train- 
ing in memory. The art of a man 
is the product of his inner life. The 
biographer does not know the inner 
life of the man, and he can't say that 
a certain event led to the writing of 

the work. . j ■ <. 

"Another method is the studying of 
literature through the study of a 
language. Language is the recorded 
soul of our people. If we have a 
corrupt language we have a corrupt 
soul The sacredness of language 
cannot be driven home too much. 
However, this method is a poor one. 
The anthological method is the nriost 
beneficial and is used by the best 
teachers. Literature is for life; not 
life for literature. It is a race nimn- 
ory and has selected those things that 
constitute the spiritual upbuilding of 

tVio rftco . 

"Literature is the product of two 
elements, the creative and cherishing, 
memorv. When man learns to \vrite 
he forfeits his memory, and with the 
decav of memory comes the decay of 
attention and obserAation. as litera- 
ture is needed. The question then 
comes, what is literature? It is that 
thing which can be always read and 
enjofed and that demands attention 
at anv stage in a man's growth The 
way people waste time reading stuff 
This ?ear that is dead next year, is 
criminal. However, it is foll> to say 
?haT the classics should be read by 
everv one. Too many people buy 
sets of boks to furnish their libraries. 
It is not sets of books that we want, 
but real individual books which we 
can read and reread with a deep ap- 
preciation for them. The 
with us today is that a 
much." , • • 

During the past week Alma 
borson became enrolled in the school. 
The attendance now is 185. 

• • • 
Wednesdav morning. Miss Ely gave 

her second talk on library science. 

• ♦ • 

At the chapel exercises Friday 
morning, seven selections from James 
Whitcomb Riley's works were read by 
Bertha Hopkins and May Langford. 

• • " 

The sophomores and third year 
pupils held a joint classmeeUng 

Thursday. 

« * • 
Miss Winnifred Wright spent the 
week end at her home in Brainerd. 

• * • A 
The Misses Kata Ketcham and 

Agnes Loffall visited Laura Elberson 
at Proctor last week. 

• ♦ • 

Miss Capitola Cater spent Saturday 
and Sunday in Two Harbors. 

The Thalian Literary society held 
its regular meeting Friday afternoon. 
The following program was given: 

Piano solo • • • 

Helen Coburn. 

Recitation • 

Kata Ketcham. 

Vocal duet ;••;.• " '.',' ' ^" 

Myrtle Pierce and Wmnifrea 
Warner. 

Discussion of current events 

Club me mbers. 

CASS LAKE SALOON 

MEN GET MORE TIME- 

Cass Lake. Minn.. Oct. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Mayor Lange today 
received word from W. E. Johnson of 
the Indian department, who is in Du 
luth to the effect that ten days more 
Ubertv will be given to saloon keepers 
In Cass Lake that they may have time 
to thoroughly go through matters. 

Most of the saloon men had their 
booze removed when the order came. 
The other order was to go into effect 
tomorrow. 



PffiRCE BUTLER TO 
SUCCEED BEGG 



As General Solicitor of the 
Great Northern Rail- 
way. 

St. Paul, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 

Tlie Herald.) — "My decision to sever 

my connection with the Great North- 
ern railway has been made, and 1 ex- 
pect to he able to open an office for 
general practice in St. Paul by Jan. 1." 
That statement was made .yesterday 
morning by AV. R. Begg. for the past 
six years general solicitor of the Great 
Northern. He has been considering re- 



FURS- Milwaukee 

, If you intend to 

purchase anythmg in 
rurs thw season it will 
pay you to cone to 
Milwaukee and in- 
spect our unusually 
latgs display o( fine 
furs ana rich and 
exclusive styles — an 
immense assortment 
of small furs and gar- 
ments in the latest 
Parisian models. 

Reckmeyer furs al- 
ways carry the stamp 
of quality and relia- 
bility. You get the 
choicest there is — the 
moit approved style — 
at prices below the 
average for equal 
quality. 

It would be a prof- 
itahle trip to run into 
Milwaukee just to see 
this large display of 
elegant furs. You will 

■■^^^^^^^^ be repaid many times 

in satisfaction and in actual saving. 

Or if you will tell us your wants we will 

quote you the lowest pouible price on what 

you describe, by mail. 

WM. RECKMEYER COMPANY 

101 Wi*contir\ Street Milwaukee, Wi«. 




NEUROLOGY. 

Im m ue«v NeioiKv. .\ HyMicm of Mnalytila 
of cnuNt'M of human IIIm uud hotv to 
nholiMh them. 





trouble 
read too 



Hal- 




iPECiALIST 

V^MiNNEAPOUS 

EVE, NF.UVF AXD nilAIV SPKCIAL" 
IST <»F MiXXKAPtU.IS. 

Will be at Parlor K. Spalding Hotel, 
Wednesday and TImrsday, Oct. 20 
ana 21. 

Dr. E. S. Bugbee relieves all eye 
strain that causes catarjict. blindness, 
red, sore and inflamed eyes, head- 
aches, dizziness, black and floating 
spots, nervousness, etc., without drugs 
or pain. Unexcelled by (Ocular or 
Medical Science. All cases thorough- 
ly examined under Dr. Bugbee's Skia- 
scopy, revealing the .slightest errors of 
refraction as well as any diseased or 
abnormal condition of the eyes. 
Glasses made that will fit. New 
lenses put in old frames if desired. 
Replaces lenses from prescription or 
from pieces sent by mail. A com- 
plete record kept of every case and 
a guarantee and prescription number 
given with over\' pair of glasses fitted. 
Artificial Eye.s. 

Special attention to cure and relief 
of nervous trouble.^^. such as lienfne**, 
Axthma, StammeriiiK. ^t. VUum Dnnee* 
IleadacheM, Stomach, etc. These trou- 
bles are largely caused and come from 
irritation of the vital nerve and brain 
centers, caused from uncoirectcd eye 
strain, and the wearing of properly 
fitted glasses will relieve the.se c<jndi- 
tions. Sn|»erior Hotel, Superior, Mon- 
dsiy and TiirNday, Oct. IH aud 10. 



PIERCE BUTLER. 



signing his position for the past couple 
of months, but the final decision was 
made vesterday, so as to withdraw his 
name from the .•stockholders' meeting 
for re-election as a director of the 
company. 

Mr. Begg has been a stockholder and 
director of the company for several 
years, and, with R. I. Farrington, vice 
president, and Edward Sawyer, treas- 
urer, his term expired Thursday. In 
order that the matter might be settled 
and a new director chosen, Mr. Begg 
announced his retirement. 

It is understood that Pierce Butler 
of How. Mitchell & Butler, will suc- 
ceed Mr. Begg as general solicitor. 
Mr. Butler was formerly attorney for 
the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & 
Omaha, and he has been prominent In 
the rate cases. 



For an enjoyable time g^o to 

TEMPLE 
ROLLER RINK 

Second Avenue East. 



LrADIESI 



Do you want the latest In Halr- 
dvesslng? I've ju.st returned from the 
East and am now prepared to dress 
vour hair the KugliMh, Parin, or Mop 
.Style, which is so much the rage. Trim- 
mings of all descriptions to match. 



Miss KeUy. 



NEW CUYUNA RANdE 

MINE LS PROMISLNG. 

Deerwood. Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Operations at the 
Kenned V mine are going along nicely. 
Stock piles from the old shaft are 
looming up. The work on the new 
shaft Is progressing. The miners are 
now down eighty-two feet and expect 
to strike the ledge by the end of this 
month. 



DANES STILL 

BEUEYECOOK 

Barrill Statement Has Shaken 
Faith in Former Ex- 
ploit 

Copenhagen, Oct. 16. — The affidavit 
of Edward Barrill, denying that Dr. 
Cook reached the summits of Mount 
McKinley and which was considered 
here as a vague reply to the affidavit 
by Dr. Cook, is believed to have weak- 
ened somewhat the American ex- 
plorer's position that he ascended the 
mountain to its apex. Public opinion, 
however, still favors his claim that he 
reached the North Pole. The news- 
papers are reticent on tlie subject, but 
the authorities and the explorers con- 
tinue in their belief in Dr. Cook. 



Don't complain about cost of living. 
Barthe-Martin sell groceries at whole- 
sale. 



DO IT FOR 
YOURSELF 



INVESTIGATE OUR PRICES 

AND FACILITIES FOR YOUR 

PRINTING OR BINDING 

MERRITT & HECTOR, 

Printers and Binders. 
"JTnsh Orders a Pleai jrz." 112 W. Hrst Street 



Loose 

Uaf 

Devices 



E'H.^^uju4£ett^S^ 



PPIM TE/tS* BlJ/pePS 



MaU 

Orders 

SoUcited 



PROVIDENCE BLDG., 4th Ave. W. and Superior St. Both 'Phones. 



IRun Down ? 



Ayer's Sarsaparilla is a tonic. It does 
not stimulate. It does not make you 
feel better one day, then as bad as ever 
the next. Thei% is not a drop of alcohol 
Ask yottr doctor alt ahoat Ayer's Sartapa- in it. You have the Steady, even gain 
rilla. EnUrdy free from alcohol. A strong that comes from a Strong tonic. Ask 
tonic and alteratioe. i^^f*um'. Y^^^ doctor all about this. 



*lr 



■^r 



li*> 



.fl*^ 



■Hi 




-« - 



— V- 



-H=-- 




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—'■I iJC~ rr, >M T-n r .t. v wctii 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY. OCTOBER 16. 1909. 




HERALDS WEST 
DUIiUTH DEPARTNE 

« 

BRANCH OFFICES I 
J. J. Moran, 405 Central Ave. A. Jenaen, 330 North 57th Ave. We«t. 




SCHOOL MAY BE 
READY BY FEB. 1 



OLD LANDMARK WILL BE 
REPLACED BY NEW BUILDING 



Contract for Fairmont Build- 
ing Will Be Let Next 
Week. 

It is expected that the contract for 
the new Fairmont school will be 
awarded by the board of education 
early next week. Tlie plans for the 
new structure have t>een in the hands 
of contractors for the past week, and 
all have instructions to return their 
bids next week. 

The new school will take the place 
of the old builtfiriR whicli was burned 
this fall. It will be modern in con- 
struction and handsome in architecture. 
The construction will be rushed as- 
fast as possible, and it is expected thai 
it will be ready fur classes by Feb. 
1, 1»10. , , 

Some new Ideas in public school ar- 
chitecture Avill be worked out in con- 
nection with the erection of the West 
Duluth structure. A new style cloak- 
room will economize space, and by a 
ventilating system will dry the pupils' 
garments which mav have become wet. 
The cloakrooms will be at one end of 
the classrooms, and will be concealed 
behind sectional blackboards, which 
will perform the functions of doors. 

According to the original plans, 
twelve rooms were called for in the 
specifications, but this was later 
changed bv the request of residents 
sending children to the school, and 
through the wishes of tlie alumni as- 
sociation, to a lo-room building, witli 
an auditorium included. The building 
will be constructed of brick and stone, 
and will be two stories in height. It 
Is to cost $65,000. 

Additional ground adjoining the 
property on which, the old school build- 
ing stood has bten aciiuired for play- 
grounds. 

succumkTo 
white plague 



Mrs. Alfred Hasa of 421 North Fifty- 
second avenue west, died last evening 
at lier home of tuberculosis. She was 
33 years old and is survived by a hus- 
band Dnly. The funeral will be held 
Tuesday afternoon from the Swedish 
Finnish Evangelical Lutheran church. 
Fif'y-third avenue west and Wadena 
street, with interment at Oneota cem.>- 
tery. 

Besides losing his wife. Mr. Haga also 
lost an Infant child about a year ago. 
He has recently bought some properly 
at West Duluth and has built a rt^w 
house, lie had intended to move into 
the new building In the near future. 
Tlie bodv ot the woman was br., iig!it 
to the undertaking pa.lors of W. II. 
Richter. 




^Plioto by Ablwtt. • 

THE FRAME SHACK AT THE CORNER OF CENTRAL AVENUE 

AND RAMSEY STREET. 

for, business purposes in the western 
entf of the city. 

The upper story will be used entirely 
for office purposes, while the lower 
portion will be used for mercantile pur- 
poses. The building-is of sufficient size 
to acconmiodate three ordinary stores 
on the ground floor,- but the Scott- 
Kreidler company will reserve the cen- 
ter apartments for Its office. The other 
two rooms will be leased. 

The building is also to have a full 
tasemenl. Work has already begun on 
tearing down the old buildings, which 
now occupy the corner, and as soon as 
this is finished, excavation work will 
start at once. The contract has not yet 
been let, but it is expected that It will 
be in a few days. It is expected that 
the guilding will not be ready for oc- 
cupancy until the latter part of win- 
About twenty-four years ago this cor- 
ner was swept clean by a fire and the 
nre.senl Structures afterwards built_ 
They have not been kept in repair of 
late vears. and have been considered 
an eye-sore to the people of West Du- 
lugh One of the buildings occupied 
l,v the Hazen & Getchell real 
estate o.^ice has been built more re- 



One of the oldest landmarks of West 
Duluth is now passing away to make 
room for a modern two-story struc- 
ture. 

It is a group of old shacks situated 
on the northwest corner of Central ave- 
nue and Ramsey street, and occupied by 
a livery stable, news stand and a real 
estate office. 

The S-ott-Kreidler real estate agency 
of North Central avenue is putting up 
tlie new building, which will replace 
the old structure on that corner. Al- 
though the price of the new olTice 
building has not yet been made public. 
It is understood that It will cost In the 
neighborhood of $15,000. 

The new structure will be a tri- 
angular-shaped building, with a 90-foot 
frontage on Central avenue and ex- 
tending back along Ramsey street for 
ninety feet. The rear of the building 
will face the Northern Pacific railroad 
right-of-way, extending for 130 feet 
from the corner. 

Nothing but the very best of ma- 
terial will be used in the construction, 
the specifications calling for pressed 
brick. It will be modern in every par- 
when completed will be 



string of victories to their credit. The 
Tigers have been out almost every 
night or afternoon for practioe, and 
are In fine trim. . t^ i .i, ■„ 

A big crowd from West Duluth is 
expected to go over with the Tigers 
to Superior. Between halves a game 
may be arranged between the Broad- 
wavs of Superior and the Fairmont?. 

The West Duluth fans will leave In 
a body on the 1:55 p. m. train for Su- 
perior tmorrow afternoon. The fol- 
lowing is the lineup of the Tigers: 
Wlnton, center; Blanchard, left tackle; 
McCloud, right tackle; Buey, left 
guard; Poissant, right guard: Drake, 
left end; Fellman, right end; Rv^n. 
left half; Abrahamson, right hall; 
Ross, fullback, and Munion, quarter- 
back and captain. 

Engagement Annonneed. 

The announcement has been made 
of the engagement of Miss Rena An- 
derson to Gordon Rice. The wedding 
will take place on Nov. 30. Both of 
the young people are known to many 
West Duluth people. The couple will 
probably make their future home in 
the western end ofthe city. 
♦ 

Kynell Is Buried. 

The funeral of Matt Kynell of 5514 
Nicollet street, who died Thursday, 
was held this afternoon from the 
Swedish-Finnish Lutheran church. 
Fifty-third avenue west and Wadena 
street with burial at Oneota cemetery. 
The members of the Modern Samaritan 
lodge attended In a body. He Is sur- 
vived by a wife and four children and 
had lived in West Duluth for twen- 
ty ytars. 

Will Meet' Relatives. 

Rev. Gideon Nylander, pastor of the 
Third Swedish Baptist church at West 
l>uluth, left yesterday for New York 
city, where he will Join his mother and 
brother, who are expected to arrive 
this week from Sweden. They will re- 
turn with him to West Duluth, where 
they ill visit this winter. 

Play Makes a Hit. 

Many attended the social given last 
evening at the Westminster Presby- 
terian church, given by the yoing men 
of the Christian Endeavor society. It 
was featured by a one-act sketch on 
•Modern Justice." 

The play was written by C. I. Towner 
and Loyal Shober, and concerns a rich 
man who gets away with $10,000 and 
who Is acquitted when he is tried. 
Rastus Jphnsing, a colored gentleman, 
is sent up for ten yej&s Inr the same 
court for chicken stealing. 

The ployers gave their parts very 
well, and the costuming was good. The 
cast follows: 

Judge Sendthemup. .. Aleck' Anderson 
Prosecutor Thinksheknowsltall. . . . 

C. I. Towner 

Attorney for the Defense Dol.ittle 

. . . . .L. Shober 

Officer Lockthemupskl .]. . j» . .' 

WilBai* McClelland 



DATE IS SET 
FORLEaURE 

Dr. took Will Tell His Story 

Here on OcL 

23. 



admits the theft of $176 of the money. 
He left soon after the theft and was 
arrested at Charleston. 



Famous Explorer Will Fur- 
nish Proof of His 
Claims. 



"DO IT for 
DULUTH" 

Montana Cities Buy More 

Duluth Coffee Than 

Duluth Does. 



StomachTroubles 

Vanish 
Li ke Ma gic 

FREE 

to 

Every 
Man 

or 

Woman 




ticular. and wnen «.ujiip.<^i<-" "••• — l""n,, tvinn thf other two 
one of the most up-to-date structures | cently than the oiner i\>o 



QUARTERLY RALLY 
OF YOUNG PEOPLE 



The Baptist Young People's Union of 
the Head of the Lakes licld its quar- 
terly rallv last evening at the West 
Duluth Bantist church. Fifty-ninth 
avenue west and Grand. Delegates irom 
all the Baptist churches of Duluth and 
Superior were In attendance. 

Dr J S. Kirtley of Duluth gave an 
infresting address to the young people 
and a fine musical program was also 
g! -en after the business session. Solos 
were rendered bj- Miss Erickson and 
Marion Flack. The choir of th-3 W- .-t 
Duluth church also gave a numbor of 
selections. 

nothincTtoToxceal. 

George McDonald Says He Seeiired 
Divorce From First W ife. 

George McDonald of 3315 Chestnut 
street called at The Herald and said 
that he is the George McDonald for 
whom Mrs. George McDonald of Potts 
Headquarters. Mich., is supposed to be 
starching. He says he doesn t 
whether or not his former 



know 
wife is 



In West Duluth, but if she Is he will 
be found at his home. He says he 
secured a divorce many years ago 
from his first wife and married again. 
He has nothing to conceal, and denies 
that he married again without secunug 
a divorce. _ 

WEST DULITH CHLRCHES. 

Rev. W. G. Boyle W ill Preach First 
Sermon at Asbury. 

Rev. W. G. Boyle of Deer River. 
Minn., who has come to W^est Duluth 
to take up the pastorate of the Asbury 
M. E. church, will preach his first ser- 
mon to the West Duluth congregation 
tomorrow morning. 

The other services at the Asbury M. 
E. church will be as usual. 

• m * 

\t the West Duluth Baptist church, 
Fifty-ninth avenue west and Grand. 
Rev. Arthur J. Hoag. the pastor, will 
preach on "Equipped for feervlce at 
the morning service at 10:30 o clock 
and on "The New Weapon at < .30 in 
the evening. Sunday school will be 
held at noon and the Baptist >oung 
Peoples union will meet at 6Ao o clock, 

• • « 

At the Merritt Memorial M. E. 
church. Forty-sixth ave%iue west and 
Halifax street. Rev. E. F. .Stidd. the 
pastor, win conduct both ^ services. 
The morning sermon is on A Man. 
and the evening topic is "The Fountain 
of Life." Sunday school will be at 11 
o'clock, class meeting at noon, and 
Epworth league at 6:45 p. m. 

• • • 

Rev D G. Cole, the temporary pas- 
tor of the Plvmouth Congregational 
church, Fiftv-fourtli avenue west and 
Bristol street, will preach on A 
Man's Value" at 10:30 tomorrow morn- 
ing At the evening service at 7:30 
o'clock he will deliver a sermon on 
"The Art of Right Thinking." 
Sunday school will meet at noon 



and the Young People's Christian En- 
deavor society will hold a meeting at 
6:45 o'clock. The weekly Prayer meet- 
ing is to be held Thursday of ne.\t 
week. 

• • • -w- 

At the St. Stephen's TJvangelical 
Lutheran church. Sixty-seventh ave- 
nue west and Raleigh street, theie 
will be services tomorrow morning at 
10:15 o'clock and conducted in tlie 
German language by the pastor, Rev 
W. Slevers. Sunday school will meet 

at noon. 

• • • 
The usual services will be held to- 
morrow at the Westminster Presbyte- 
rian church with Rev, J. G. Le'^ch 
preaching at the morning service at 
10-30 o'clock. Sunday school will be 
noon and the Christian Endeavor 



Plaintiff, Mr. Richman. . . . .^ 

William M. Ritchie 

Defendant, Rastus Jolmsing 

Earl (jalbraith 

Mrs. Johnsing Charles Sizler 

Clerk of Court Blunderbus 

Eraef t Anderson 

Jury: Pan Handle Pete, Joe Gans, John 

L, Sullivan. James J, Jeffries, Kid 

Corbett, Battling Nelson. 

■ *■ * 

Funeral at Herriian. 

The body of Edward Wengelln, 22 
years old, who was killed at Proctor 
Tuesday while at work in the rail- 
road boiler shops, was pent this aftsr- 
noon to Herman. Minn., where the 
funeral will be held. No services were 
held over the body in Duluth. 



at 



6:45 o'clock. 



ociety will meet at 

• • • 

Morning praver services and sermon 
will be at 10:45 o'clock tomorrow morn- 
ing at the Holy Apostles' Episcopal 
church Flftv-seventh avenue west and 
Elinor street. The even song and ad- 
dress Is announced for 7:30 P. m. Kev 
E B Collier, the pastor, will conduct 
both services. Sunday school will be 
at the usual hour. 

• • • 

At Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran 
church Fifty-seventh avenue west and 
Roosevelt street, there will be morn- 
ing services conducted in the Norwe- 
gian language by the pastor, B. A. 
Johnson. Sunday school will be at the 
usual hour. ^ 

TIGERS VERSUS PIRATES. 

Irving Team Will Play Football 
With Blaine Grads Sunday. 

The Irving Tigers of West Duluth 
will clash with the Alumni Pirates at 
Superior league park tomorrow after- 
noon and the game is expected to be 
interesting. , , , , . . 

Both teams have a high ranking at 
the Head of the Lakes and have a 



THE RAILROAD QUESTION THAT 
IS NOW AGITATING WEST DULUTH 




M,r. r.( th^ Pror>osed Route of the Canadian Northern and the Route Many Property Owners Desire the Road to 
Tike ThrBfack Squar^Marked Is the Phillips Hotel Comer at Central Avenue and Ramsey Street. 



Looking for Park Site. 

This afternoon members of the park 
commission and '-he special committee 
of the West Duluth Commeicial club 
met at the Phillips hotel, and from 
there look an Inspection tour about 
West Duluth for the purpose cf looking 
up suitable sites for parks and play- 

^*A\''the meeting of the We.-it Duluth 
Commercial club last evening this mat- 
ter came up for discussi n. as well as 
that of the Canadian Northern railroad 
entrance into West Dulu th. 

Elect Officers. 

The annual meeting of the Ladles' 
Aid Society of the Merritt Memorial 
M. E. church, Forty-sixth avenue west 
and Halifax street, wa« neld yesterday 
afternoon at the home of Mrs. Alfred 
Merritt, 2105 East Second street. 

The annual election of officers was 
held, and the following were chosen: 
Mrs. Florence Merritt, president; Mrs. 
E. Ward, vice president: Mrs. Alta 
Wheeler, secretary, and Mrs. Edith 
Merritt, treasurer. 

The ladles planned to have their an- 
nual winter sale and supper on Friday 
evening. Dec. 3. 

W est Duluth Briefs. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Richter of 423 
Central avenue returned this morning 
from Hibbing, Minn., where they at- 
tended the ihneral of Jameg JCrmating- 
er, father to Mrs. Richter. 

Webster Cavanaugh returned yes- 
terday from a trip to Wenton, Minn. 
Melvin Glover, who for the past two 
years has been in New York state, re- 
turned this morning to West Duluth on 
a visit to the home of his parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. John Glover, of 23 North 
Forty-fourth avenue west. He will re- 
turn to the East in a few days. 

Frank H. Wade returned iast even- 
ing from a trip to his claim in North 
Dakota. , ^ 

Miss Mabel Strandmark of. Traverse 
street has gone to St. Paul, where she 
will visit for a few days with rela- 
tives and friends. 

Miss Lizzie Campbell of North Fifty- 
seventh avenue west was operated up- 
on for appendicitis yesterday at St. 
Marys hospital. 

Mrs Luther Taeger and son and 
Edg'ar Mattson, Jr.. of Minneapolis, are 
visiting in West Duluth for a few days, 
guests at the home of Capt. and Mrs. 
H. E. Uelstrom of 406 North Fifty- 
eighth avenue west. 

Otto Ceyborski and Alex Trombley 
will go to Munger tomorow on a hunt- 
ing trip. , , ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Boden and daughter, 
who have been stopping in West Du- 
luth during the past summer liave left 
for Two Harbors, where they will make 
their future home. 

F. J. Cullen will open up a new em- 
ployment office at West Duluth In the 
near future. He intends to be ready 
for business about Nov. 1. 

William Bartell, Herman Jacques 
and Joseph Beglinger hav«i gone to 
►\dolph, Minn., on a short business trip. 
Mrs, K. N. Johnson of North Fifty- 
third avenue west has as her guest 
Miss Julia Robb of Fond du Lac, Wis. 
Mr. and Mrs. V. O. Larson of Fifty- 
ninth avenue west are entertaining Mr. 
and Mrs. B. F. Hanley of Fergus Falls. 
The Klltin Construction company is 
laying a new cemeht sidewalk in front 
of" the Getty-Smith block on North Cen- 
tral avenue. 

A. P. Freeberg of 106 Nc>rth Sixty- 
third avenue west, one of the pioneer 
residents at the Head of the Lakes, 
is dangerously ifl at his home. 

The street car company is putting in 
a "Y" at Fifty-seventh avenue wGst for 
the accommodation of extra cars dur- 
ing the rush hours of day. The large 
cars will be put on this line about 
l>ec. 1. , . „ , 

The ladies of the Holy Apostles Epis- 
copal church. Fifty-seventh avenue 
west and Elinor street have been hold- 
ing a rummage sale this week at Fifty- 
sixth avenue west and Grand avenue. 
Watch repairin g. Hurst. W . Duluth. 

HASKELL FILES DEMURRER. 



Duluth is to be given an opportunity 
to Judge of the world's famous contro- 
versy that is being waged between Dr. 
Frederick A. Cook and Commander Rob- 
ert Peary. Arrangements were com- 
pleted today for the appearance here 
of Dr. Cook, who will tell his story of 
the discovery of the North Pole, and 
who will also exhibit pliotographic 
views of the Arctic regions of the 
frozen North. These views were takin 
by Dr. Cook. 

Dr. Cook will tell the story of the 
perilous journey to the pole, and will 
give facts to pr«ve that the accusa- 
tions of Commander Peary are without 
justice or foundation; and will give a 
detailed account of the incidents that 
led up to the starting for the first suc- 
cessful journey to the pole. 

The lecture will be given at the First 
Methodist church. Saturday evening, 
Oct. 23. 

Since the almost simultaneous an- 
nouncement of the two grreat Arctic ex- 
plorers of the discovery of the North 
Pole, the whole civilized world has been 
eagerly following the details jt Lh.3 
claims of the two men. Dr. Cook has 
all along claimed that he Is willing to 
bring the controversy to a test of proof, 
and says that he has ample proof of his 
visit to the farthest north region. 

In his trip to the pole, Dr. Cook took 
a large number of photographs of the 
country and the people. These pictures 
will be exhibited during his lecture. 

Dr. Cook is laying his case before 
the people of the country. Already, 
throughout the country there Is the 
growing belief that Dr. Cook Is really 
the man who discovered the pole. 
Wherever he has appeared he has 
strengthened that belief. He tells his 
story In a straightforward manner, giv- 
ing details in plenty of one of the most 
remarkable expeditions that has ever 
been successfully completed. 

Everywhere he has appeared Dr. 
Cook has been given ovations. His trip 
over the country has gone far towards 
convincing the people who have heard 
him that he has ample basis for his 
claim. In his lecture In Duluth, Dr. 
Cook will state his side of the famous 
con^roverov, and will reiterate his state- 
ments that he is ready and willing to 
submit the case to any court of inquiry 
that the government may wish lo 
name. 

She W'M lMea«autl> SurprUed. 

Miss H. E. Bell, Wausau, Wis., writes. 
"Before I commenced to take h oiey s 
Kidney Pills I had severe pains in my 
back, could not sleep and was greatly 
troubled with headache. The first few 
doses of Foley's Kidney Pills gave me 



One of the best examples of the 
manner in which Duluth people do 
not patronize home industry is shown 
in the coffee business. 

Probably many people do not even 
know that coffee is roasted in Duluth, 
but it is, and Duluth coffee is better 
known in Montana than it is in the 
East end. or the West end either, for 
that matter. 

There are several cities in the West 
which buy more Duluth coffee than 
Duluth does. 

The officials of the company say 
that for some reason the Duluth deal- 
ers do not take too kindly to the 
Duluth product, with several notable 
exceptions. It will be interesting to 
know that one of these exceptions is 
the Commercial club, which buys all 
the coffee used at the club rooms 
from the Aroma company. 

The company has two giant roast- 
ers in its plant and they are kept 
busy most of the time. Nearly every 
day of the year about 7,000 pounds 
of coffee is roasted there. But if 
Duluth people insisted upon buying 
coffee roasted in Duluth, it is a safe 
bet that the management would be 
jumping within a week to double and 
triple the size of its plant, and prob- 
ably other concerns would spring up. 
\t present there are about twenty- 
fiVe people on the payrolls who are 
helping to make Duluth prosperous 
by spending their wages in Duluth 
markets. This number would be 
several times greater if Duluth peo- 
ple bought coffee roasted in Duluth. 
The Aroma company not only 
roasts coffee, but is putting up elec- 
trically cut coffee 
patent process 



Would vou like to eat all you want 
to and what you want to, when you 
want to, without a chance for trouble 
In your stomach 

Would you like to say farewell for 
the rest of your life to Dyspepsia, In- 
dlgeHtloB, Sour .Stomach. Distress after 
eating. Nervousness, Catarrh of- the 
Stoiuavh. Heart Fluttering, Sick Head- 
ache and CouHtipatlonf 

Then send me 10 cents to cotpt post of p.irking and 
I will niall you alsolutely free on" of tJwse wonder- 
ful .Stonuicli Prafu. TJiey ngulate the bowels, 
relieve snnntss, strengthen every nirve anil muscle of 
your stomach, relieve you at < ncc biiJ make ycu feel 
like a new m.in or woman. So write today encloslnt 
10 tents f r the postage, etc, and gel < iie of tliese 
woniVrful .Stomach DniftH tliat are celebrated Ijet-ame 
Uiey cure where medidnes fail. Write Pr. O. C. 
Young, 117 NaUonal Bank Bldg.. Jackson. .Mich. 



ii 



DO IT FOR 
YOURSELF" 



The People of Duluth Are Crying 

Out A2«in5t the Hi^h Cost 

of Living. 



If You Are Sick It Costs You More 

to Live Than if You 

Are Well. 



under a special 

1.." The officers say 

that "the cVmpany is more than hold- 
ing its own in outside fields, where 
competition is sharpest. _ 



N 



relief, and two bottles cured me 



The 



reiiet ana iwo uumco vv..^.— ■•• • 
quick results surprised me and I can 
honestly recommend them." Sold by 
all druggists. ^^^^^^^ 

THE POLICE 

COURT GRIST 



The "Black Maria ' Surprises 
Lakeside People 
a Visit. 

Tena Coulter is said by the police 
to have imbibed too freely last night 
in her sylvan abode at Lakeside, and 
under the influence of the joy water 
to have startled the peaceful inhabit- 
ants of that quiet suburb by her dem- 
onstrations of happiness. 

The police explain that Tena is 
well known to them, having been a 
character about the city for many 
years She weighs over 200 potands, 
and has a failing for liquor and an 
overwhelming desire to talk, they saj . 
They sent the patrol wagon all the 
i:^y out there last night to fetch 

^Ea?t enders thought a riot was in 
progress, and were more than sur- 
prised to see the Black Maria gallop- 
ing past their mansions. The :ur- 
ther east the patrol went, the greater 

^^Ten'k'^^deciared that she was riot 
guilty of being drunk and her trial 
was set for Monday. The last sum- 
mer she has not been rolling in wealth 
fnd has been trying to make both e^ds 
meet by living in a tent and doing odd 
jobs. ^ 

Jessie Crackett, who had just fin- 
ished a term of twenty days in the 
county jail, was brought in last night 
fSr being drunk. She pleaded guilty 
and got $10 or ten days. 

Joe Truckey*admitted that he was 
a vag and had been hanging around 
doini nothing altogether too long^ 
The court gave him $25 or thirty 
days Sentence was suspended on 
condition that he shake the dust of 
DiTluth from his feet before Monday. 

• • * 
John Miller, employed at the saloon 
at 513 West Superior street Pleaded 
not guilty to assaulting Alfred li.k- 
dahl and will be tried Monday morn- 
ing Miller claims that Ekdahl 
"bummed" him for a drink in the 
morning and that he became obstrep- 
erous when turned down. He says 
he didn't assault him. but put him 
out of th e place. 

Don't complain about cost of living. 
Barthe-Martfn sell groceries at whole- 
sale. ^ 



COPPER STOCKS 
ARE IMPROVED 

Active Trading on Duluth 

Exchange With St. Mary 

as Feature. 

Boston copper stocks advanced dur- 
ing the short session today, and the 
Duluth share market was active and 
prices on a better level. 

Although the session P" tlie local ex- 
change ends at 11 o'clock Saturdays, 
the total sales were 4,146 shares, with 
.St. Mary as ihe leading feature. The 
stock was In heavy demand throughout 
the price advancing from 38c to 40c 
There was active bidding for it at 40c 
Sold by at the close. Most encouraging reports 
from the property were partly respon- 
sible for the bulg:e today. 

Butte & Superior sold at $2.2o and 
$o"o Live oak at $7.62 1^, Calumet & 
Sonora at |11.12>^. Calumet & Mon- 
tnnft at $1.62%. Keating at $1.07, 
S^er^a a\ $'5.50, Denn at $4.70 and Car- 
man at $125 and $1.30. 

In Boston, North Butte advanced 
from $59.50 to $60.50 and closed at 
$59.50 bid and $60 asked. Amalga- 
mated opened at $81.75, advanced to 
$S3 62% and closed at $83.25 bid and 

$83.37 Vi asked. 

Greene-Cananea advanced from 

$10.50 to $10 87>^ and closed at 
SIO.6214 bid and $10.87% asked. Ca - 
umet & Arizona opened at $99J?. ad- 
vanced to $100 and closed at $99.;iU bid 
and $100 asked. Giroux opened at 

$8.75 and closed at $8.62% bid and 
$8.87% a.sked. Superior &, Pittsburg 
opened at $15. advanced to $15.12% and 
cfosed at $15 bid and $15.12% asked. 
Anaconda opened at $48, advanced to 
$48.25 and closed at $48. 2a bid. 

Following are the closing prices on 
the Duluth exchange: 



LiMted S<ock» — 



Bid. I Asked. 



American Saginaw 

Butte Coalition 

Butte-Alex Scott, pt. pd. 

do full paid 

Butte-Ballaklava 
Calumet & Arizona. 
Cactus Development 

Copper Queen 

Cordova part paid 

do full paid . 

Denn-Arizona 

Giroux 

Greene-Cananea .. 

Keweenaw 

Lake Sup. & Sonora 

Live Oak 

North Butte .~ 

Ojlbway . .. ..... 

Savanna part paid... 

do full paid 

Shattuck 

Superior & Pittsburg. 

Walnut Grove 

Warren 

L'nliKted StockK — 
Arizona & Michigan.. 

Black Mountain 

Butte & Superior 

Calumet & Montana.. 

Calumet & Corbin 

Calumet & Sonora 

Carman Consolidated. 
Chief Consolidated . . . 

Cliff 

Duluth & Sonora 

Elonita Development. 

Keating Gold 

Lake Superior & Ariz. 

Mowitza 

National 

rted Warrior 

Rawhide Royal 

San Antonio 

St. Mary's 

Superior & Globe 

Tuolumne 

Wolverine & Arizona. 

Zenith Lead 

Sierra 

Butte & Ely • 




Get well and it will cost you less to 
live! More, it will increase your earn- 
ing ability and thereby reduce the 
ratio of the amount you are com- 
pelled to spend for the necessities of 
life, as against the amount that you 
can earn. If you are now without 
ambition, without energy, holding 
down some inferior positon on ac- 
count of ill health, look into the mat- 
ter closely, and you will certainly 
realize that it does not pay you to 
continue. Not only might you, by re- 
gaining health, fit yourself to occupy 
a more responsible position, at a 
higher salary, but you can double your 
ability to enjoy the good things of 
life. The sick man does not really 
care how much he earns so long as it 
is enough to buy the necessities of 
existence and pay his doctors' bills, he 
has lost the capability of enjoying 
himself and therefore does nut need 
to spend money for that purpose. 
What is the use of living that kind of 
a life, however, the interminable round 
of three meals a day, a visit to the 
doctor occasionally, the nightly at- 
tempts to sleep, and the days of pain- 
racked attempts to do good work? 
Does it pay? A few dollars spent in 
the regaining of lost health and vi- 
tality will place you again on the 
plane of your fellow men, capable of 
doing good work, and of enjoying 
your leisure time to the full. Your 
trouble may not incapacitate you, it 
may not confine you to your bed, but 
if it interferes with your enjoyment 
of life, you should take steps to have 
it cured. We only live once, let us 
LIVE while we can. Just a word of 
warning in conclusion, — Don't take 
your case to a "Near Specialist"' and 
don't try to cure yourelf. If you do, 
your last case will be worse than 
your first. Go to. some reputable spe- 
cialist in the Diseases of Men (if you 
are a man), tell him your trouble and 
aslf him if he can cure, you. Take a 
legal guarantee that he can, if he says 
he can. There is only one firm in the 
country, so far as we know, that will 
do this, the Progressive Medical As- 
sociation, of No. 1 West Superior 
street, Duluth. 



^mmwn 



The great non-poisonous antiseptic 
for the complexion, face blemishes 
and skin eruptions, sores and wounds. 
At leading druggists. 75c. 

For sale and recommended in Duluth 
by Wm. A. Abbett. druggists. 129 West 
Superior street, 101 West Fourth street, 
and 932 East Second street. 



consideration of the situation and the 
unoflicial representations of Senator 
Aldrich. It is understood that to 
avoid a tariff war. France now is pre- 
pared to offer her minimum rates on 
a number of articles in return for a 
similar concession from America, but 
it is also understood that the list of 
such concessions is rather limited. 



^Q^mIS 




The accompanying map shows more 
clearly than words the point of dis- 
pute between the people of West I>u- 
luth and the Canadian Northern Rail- 
way company as to the route which 
the road is to follow in entering the 
city through WJest Duluth. 

The dotted line shows the route of 
the Canadian Northern as contemplated 
at present, and the heavier lines 
paralleling the Northern Pacific tracks 
Bhows the route as the people of AJest 
Duluth desire to have it laid. "They 
disclaim all desire to hinder the Can- 



adian Northern In its plans, but they 
say that they want the railway to en- 
ter the cltv at the least possible ex- 
pense in depreciation of property 
values along the right-of-way. 

It is poinV~J out that if the pro- 
posed roite is followed, the railroad 
will have many elevated crossing to 
build in the principal residence district 
of West Duluth: it will have to cross 
Codv street, which Is the principal out- 
let "to Grand avenue; it will cause the 
enclosure into a. triangle bounded by 
railroad tracks of a large tract of 
fine residence property, which will re- 
sult in every lot being seriously dam- 
aged in value. 



The people claim that by following 
the route as they would have It do, the 
Canadian Northern will not seriously 
impair r.\e value of any property, as 
it will parallel the Northern Pacific 
right-of-way. Also, the number of 
crossings of principal avenues will be 
greatly reduced at great s.avlng for 
construction. It is claimed that every 
crossing must be overnead, with the 
railway tracks raised and the street 
depressed, and the number of such 
crossings to be made should be a con- 
sideration with the railway officials 
when laying out the route. 

The railroad will begin its elevated 
tracks at Sixtieth avenue west. 



Ardmore, Okla., Oct. 16.— X demurrer 
to the indictments against Governor 
Haskell and three others in the 
Muskogee town lot cases were filed by 
the defense In the federal court here 
today following the action of the 
court yesterday in overruling a motion 
by the defense to quash. 

BISHOP HARE NO BEHER. 

Atlantic City, N. J., Oct. 16.— There 
was on change today in the condition 
of Bish.op William Hobart Hare of 
South Dakota, whose deatli has been 
expected for three days. 



PLEADS GUILH 
TO LARCENY 



When arraigned before Judge H. 
B. Dlbell in district court yesterday 
afternoon on an indictment returned 
by the last grand jury, charging him 
with grand larceny in the second de- 
gree, Harvey V. Zimmerman, who was 
brought back from Charlesrton, 111., by 
Chief C. H. Troyer, entered a plea 

Zimmerman is accused of the theft 
of $3 50 from the Alger-Smith Lum- 
ber company, with which he was con- 
nected in a confidential capacity. He 



JUSSERAND TO 

TALK TARIFF 

French Ambassador Starts 

on His Return to This 

Country. 

Paris, Oct. 16. — M. Jusserand, am- 
bassador to the United States^ sailed 
on the steamer La Provence from 
Havre today to resume his duties at 
Washington. He Is prepared to take 
up tariff negotiations as soon as he 
reaches his post. 

As previously reported, the attitude 
of the French government towards 
the American tariff has been consider- 
ably modified during the last 
months as " 



the result of a 



few 
mature 



Oxy-Tonic will eradicate disease 
when other methods or medicines fail. 
It cures because of its oxygen proper- 
ties, and contains no noxious drugs, 
cheap whisky or alcohol. We guaran- 
tee it or money back. Does not this 
show our confidence in the same? 
Twenty-two years of practical experi- 
ence with thousands of cures assures 
the user of Oxy-Tonic that it is the 
surest and safest liquid germicide in 
the world to use. Try it and become 
convinced with the first bottle. If your 
druggist does not have it in stock or- 
der from us direct. 

LW.LeithheadDrngCo. 

DISTRIBUTERS. 
Duluth, Minn. 

The OXY-TONIC COMPANY 

31 WeHt IlllnolN Street. 
Clilcaico, lU. 



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mtm""^ 



*m nt 



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STREETCARS 
OF MAHOGANY 

Brazilian City Offers Example 

of South America s 

WeallL 



'The Great Treasure House 

of the World; Says 

J. H. Warner. 



"South America is the great unde- 
veloped treasure house of the world," 
said J. H. Warner of Pernainbuco. 
Brazil, who represents South America 
on the international committee of the 
y. M. C. A., and wl»o is in Duluth at 
the present time. 

• Braxil is a country larger than the 
United States, with a popuhition of but 
I'O.OOit.oOO people, the greater part of 
whiih is centered in large cities, and 
It lias an untouched virgin forest two- 
thirds the size of tlie United States. 
with untold wealth In all kinds of 
hardwoods. 

In the city of Para the street oars 
are made of mahogany. 

"Many people have the iiiea that 
Brazil and other Soutli American coun- 
tries are slow and not energetic, and 
that the people of those countries are 
lazv and wortliless. The city of Rio 
Janeiro, liowever. has just completed a 
project that would stagger any other 
cUv In the world. They liave spent 
40,dOO,OrtO English pounds in improve- 
ments to the city. The old Tllo was 
tinhealthfuf. The streets ran parallel 
tt> the iiarbor front, and the city was 
ni>t properly ventilated by the sea 
breezes. They went to work, tore 
down l.?iOO buildings in the very heart 
of the citv. and constructed a wide 
avenue a mile in length, running 
down to the Jiarbor. They went right 
through two small mountain.^, one of 
dirt and the othf>r of solid granite. The 
granite they took to build a great sea 
wall fifteen miles In length. This did 
away wUh an old beach, where the 
sewaR<» uspd to wash up. Behind the 
wall they filled in with the debris from 
• he housf»s and ih.- dirt from the other 
n.ountain and they made a great long 
drtvewav and park. I'eople who do a 
thing like this cannot be very back- 
ward. 

"The V. M. C. A. lias nine city asso- 
ciations In South America. They are 
located in Buenos Ayres. Uio Janeiro. 
Pernambuco. San Paulo. Juiz de Fora, 
Montevideo I'orto Ategre. Rio Grande 
de Sul and Santiago de t:hile. There is 
a great field for association work 
ihere.. " 

A banquet was given Mr. Warner 
last evening at the Y. M. C. A., at 
whicii Wat.son S. Moore presided. Mr, 
Warn«r will give a lecture tomorrow 
afternoon at the Y. M O. A. on "The 
Heart of the Neglected Continent.' 
Miss Floreiice Hyland will sing. The 
lecture is a famous one. and very in- 
teresting The meeting is free to all 
Duluth m-'H who care to attend. 
» 

Don't complain about cost of living. 
Barthe-Mariin sell groceries at wiiole- 
sa'e. 

THREE FARMERS 
AT THE MARKET 



Customers Come for Produce 

in Automobiles and 

Carriages. 

Three farmers offered their produce 
for sale today at the public market 
established at the Armory, Second ave- 
nue eaat and First street. 

They came in with wagons loaded 

with the products of tlieir gardens, and 
by noon had managed-to dispose of tiie 
larger part of their stock. The dis- 
play w^as tempting. Tlie skeptic who 
does not think farming amounts to 
much in and about I>uluth would soon 
change l:is mind by a trip to the Ar- 
mor> on one of the market days. 
Wednesdays or Saturdays. 

The beets, carrots, parsnips, cabbage. 
potat->es and other products of tlie 
truck garden were large and firm, a 
delight to the eye of the Iiousewife 
planning a hearty Sunday dinner. Most 
of the custonxers carried away their 
purchases, some in automobiles, some 
in carriages and tl;e rest in their arms 
or on street lars 



ADDITIONAL 
SOCIETY NEWS 



Tlie Pliilaihca cia.-s of the First 
Presbyterian cliurch entertained at a 
Japanese party last evening at the 
home of Miss Agnes Mae .Johnson of 
BIS East Fifth street. The decora- 
tions and amusements of the evening 
were suggestive i>f Japan. Thirty 
guests gowned in Japanese costumes 
were entertained. 

• • • 

The members of the Some club en- 
tertained at a dancing party last even- 
ing at Harmony hall at Lester park. 
The hall was decorated in autumn 
leaves and the club colors, black and 
gold. Dr. Marco's orchestra played 
the program of dancing music and tlie 
cliaperones were Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Block and Mr and Mrs. L. Larson. 
About 130 guests enjoyed tlie affair. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. George ^X. Rathbun 
have returned from Royaiton. where 
they attended the wedding of Mr. 
Rathbun's sister. 

• « ' • 

Mrs. W. S. Wriglit, who has been ill 
for three week.s at her home. 316 Kast 
Second street was removed today to 
St. Mary's liospital. where she will 
undergo an operati>>n. 

DONATION DAY 
FOR HOSPITAL 



Sl Luke's Makes Its Annual 

Appeal to Citizens of 

Duluth. 

Monday, Oct. 18, will be the annual 
donation day for St. Luke's hospital, 
and the friends of the institution 
throughout the city are requested to 
send their gifts at that time. Money 
or checks or supplies are most ac- 
ceptable. During the last year the 
board has ex-pended ift.OOO in an addi- 
tion to the hospital, and besides the 
crrrent e.ipense.s there is that added 
expenditure to meet in the years bills. 
The contributions will be received all 
day at the hospital. St. Luke's makes 
but this one public appeal during tlie 




tj' i.a 



Jsi 



j. 



■i»r- 



I 

\ 
I 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD.- SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1900. 



vear, and as nearly as possible it is 
hoped by the authorities that those 
who p|lan to conlribtite will send their 
gifts in next Monday. 

BOY KILLS MATE 
IN FIGHT FOR FLAG 

Murder Mars Taft's YM to 

El Paso—Slayer Is 14 

Years Oli 

El Paso. Tex., Oct. 18.— Just as 
President Taft and his party were 
stepping from his spei-ial train, and 
while the cheers of welcome were still 
ringing, Noll Morgan, a 14 -year-old 
schoolboy, said to be part Mexican, 
stabbed an American schoolmate, 
Lawrence Wimber, to death. The 
tragedy was due to a dispute over the 
possession of an American flag. 

As President Taft reached the St. 
Regis hotel, where a breakfast was to 
be tendered him by the citizens of the 
city, the dead body of the body lay 
not fiftv yards distant. It was not 
removed until the breakfast had been 
almost completed. 



IRON LANDS. 

We have 3G0 acres of land near 

the mines at Soudan, through which 

an iron formation extends. Will 

lease same on moderate royalty. 

THE L.EXOX IRON CO., 

70H Hoard of Trnde, 

Duluth, Miuu. 



c 



WPERIOR NEWS 



J 



Jorg:enson Sentenced. 



John Jorgeiison was sentenced to one 
vear in Waupun yesterday by Judge 
Charles Smitli of tlie .superior couri. 
He pleaded guiUy to a charge of lar- 
ceny from the person of Peter Logan. 
Jorgenson. it is said, held up Logan 
for $50. 

m 

Will Cousider Levy. 

The annual me«ing of the county 
board of Douglas county will be held 
Nov. 9 to consider the levy for the en- 
suing year. A trustee for the new- 
asylum will also be appointed at this 
time. Owing to the agitation now on 
foot for better roads throughout 4he 
f-ountry. there are indications that the 
levy may be Increased this year. 

Informal Reception. 

Superior Masons held an informal re- 
ception last evening in connection with 
the dedication and formal opening of 
the new temple on Hughitt avenue and 
Bflknap street. It was largely at- 
tended by members of tlie Masonic 
lodges at tlie Head of tiie Lakes and 
their families. 



Back From Convention. 

Superior was well advertised at tlie 
national convention of the Polish- 
American alliance, which was held this 
week in Milwaukee. .\bout twenty- 
five delegates from Superior attended. 
Much literature booming the Head of 
the Lakes and Superior was dis- 
tributed among tlie 1.500 deleg'ates who 
were present. 

Will Reduce x\ssessnient. 

The hoard of review met yesterday 
and as a result the assessment of tlie 
Soo's local undeveloped property will 
probably be reduced Trom |J63,000 to 
$JLi().ooi). L. T. Powell appeared for 
ti:e railroad 



WARNING! 

.\genn are :ilxmt the cl'.y iwing our name, olilm- 
Ing to give the ■Dw'jrshak finish." 

IT IS A FAKE. 

We have no ngeiit* out. 

THE DVVORSH.Mv STmiO, 

105 Wett Superior Street. 



BOMBS HRED 

IN BARCELONA 



Spanish Embassies in Berlin 

and Lisbon Are 

Threatened. 

Cerebre. France, Oct. 1^. — Private 
advices from Barcelona stat that six 
bombs were exploded in different parts 
of the city during the night and that 
several persons were wounded. 



REPORT IS 
DENIEDHERE 

Calumet & Arizona Said to 

Have Purchased Shattuck 

Properties. 

Local Attorney Says There 

Is No Truth in 

Story. 



In Boston and the Southwest the 
report that Calumet & Arizona has se- 
cured control of the Shattuck-Arizona 
Copper company are gaining much 
credence, and the Boston market Jour- 
rals have already announced the deal 
as a fact. 

The trade has heard rumors of a deal 
of the kind for several days, and the 
receipt of the Boston News Bureau'.-', 
publication of Oct. 13 clinched the 
matter in the minds of many local fol- 
lowers of the copper stock market. 

.John G. Williams of Duluth, attor- 
ney for the Shattuck-Arizona company, 
stated today that tlie report was not 
true. "There is absolutely notlting in 
it." said Mr. Williams, when told of 
tiie Boston News Bureau's announce- 
ment. Tlie bureau's account of tlie al- 
leged transaction bears a Phoenix, 
Ariz., date line, and is as follows: 

•'The directors of tlie Calumet & Ari- 
zona Mining comi)any, most of whom 
live at Calumet. Mich., liave just con- 
cluded the purchase of a controlling 
Interest in the Shattuck-Arizona Cop- 
per company, whose properties, con- 
sisting of six patented claims and a 
smeller site, are located at Blsbee and 
Douglas, Arizona, respectively. 

'The control Involves the purchase 
of 178. SCO shares of stock at a reputed 
consideration of J35 a share, which 
would mean a payment of $6,-47.500 for 
the property. There are outstanding 
350,0»iO shares, par value $10. 

"The property of the Shattuck is lo- 
cated in the northeastern portion of 
the Blsbee camp, half a mile from the 
original workings of Copper Queen and 
north of and adjoining the Calumet & 
Arizona ground. There have been per- 
sistent rumors during the past few 
weeks asserting tlie sale of this prop- 
erty. The Duluth owners repeatedly 
denied their truth, liowever. going so 
far as to assert tliat they intended to 
develop the property and would not 
begin producing until the copper mar- 
ket became more satisfactory. 

'It Is reported on good autliority, 
however, that the Calumet & Arizona 
directors have been negotiating for 
the control of their neighbor for sev- 
eral montlis, the fact that tlie ore vein 
of the latter mine dip.s into Calumet 
& Arizona territory in the lower levels 
being a strong factor in bringing the 
Michigan capitalists to tlie determina- 
tion. Then. too. it is well known that 
the life of the Calumet & Arizona mine, 
as indicate<l by the extent of its pres- 
ent ore body, is comparatively limited 
and the management has. for some 
time, been strenuously endeavoring to 
acquire copper-bearing ground that 
would in some degree insure a longer 
life for tlie corporation. This problem 
seems to be solved l>y tlie accjulsition 
of the Shattuck property, as tiie latter 
is now capable of producing at the rate 
of 1,000.000 pounds of copper a month, 
while recent developments in its lowest 
"ievels in<Hcate a wide extent ami con- 
tinuity of ore." 

Local gossip in the brokers' offices 
is to tlie effect that the stock controlled 
by Thomas Bardon. A. Guthrie. A. M. 
Chisholm and tlieir interests is wiiat 
has been purchase<l by the Calumet & 
Arizona people. It will be rememJ)ered 
that there have been some disagree- 
ments as to policies between the stock- 
holders in Siiattuck represented by 
tliese men and those iieaded by Martin 
Pattison and L. C. Shattuck. 

Considerable Shattuck-Arizona stock 
is held in Duluth, and the property Is 
very well thought of by local traders. 
It closed on the I>uluth exchange to- 
day at $22 bid and $23 asked. 



Stewart Resigns. 



.T. N. Stewart, who has been in 
charge of advertising for tlie Northern 
Pacific railway for the last year, has 
resigned to enter the .Stack-Parker Ad- 
vertising agency of Chicago. Mr. 
Stewart was formerly with the Rock 
Island-Frisco and Santa Fe systems 
in Chicago. 



Guard SphbLhIi KmUanity-. 

Lisbon. Oct. 16. — Incii>ient rioting 
continues today. The approaches to 
the Spanish embassy are guarded by 
troops. 

Riut In Verlin. 

Berlin, Oct. IB. — A crowd of Ferrer 
demonstrators shouting "Down with 
the Spaniards," made an unsuccessful 
attempt to approach the Spanisli em- 
bassy today. The police intercepted 
them, closing the adjacent streets but 

barely in time to head 200 rioters who 
were wltliin a block of tiie embassy. 
» 
Violence Itt Threatened. 

Madrid, Oct. li. — Tlie Ilepublican 
deputies today asked permission of the 
authorities to hold a public meeting tn 
protest against the execution of Fer- 
rer. If their requeist is refused they 
predict that violence will follow. 

GERMANS BUY 
SPAIN'S MINES 



St. Luke's Hospital 

»OIV.\TIO!V DAY, MOKDAY, 
OCT. 18, 1909. 

Wanted — Money. Groceries, Wines. 
I.,iquors and Delicacies for the sick. 
Old clothing, good furniture, litters 
and otlier useful articles will be grate- 
fully received at the Hospital, Ninth 
avenue east and First street. 



BEIDJI DEPOT 
IS BURGLARIZED 



New Complication Reported 

in the Casus Belh in 

Morocco. 

Paris. Oct. 16. — The Matin's corre- 
spondent at Oran, Algeria, telegraphs 
a rumor to the eftect that Mulai 
Hafid, the sultan of Morocco, has sold 
the Riff mines, which were the cause 
of the trouble between Spain and the 
Moors on the Riffian coast, to a Ger- 
man company. The correspondent 
explains that such a transaction 
w^ould be perfectly feasible, as the 
Spanish held t^e mines by reason only 
of a payment of $15,000 to Roghi. 
the pretender, who was recently put 
to death by the sultan. Should the 
fact of the sale be confirmed, conse- 
quences of the gravest character 
would appear inevitable. 



Professionals Crack Safe Get- 
ting Some Coin and 
Checks. 

Bemidji, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — .Some time last nlglit 
burglars forced an entrance to tlie 
local depot of" the Red Lake railway, 
rilled the money drav.er and blew open 

the safe taking a draft on the Great 
Northern railway for $60 and about 
$70 in ether checks and money, making 
good their escape. 

Because of tlwj isolated location of 
the depot no one heard the explosion 
and there is no possible means of get- 
ting a clue for the police to work on. 
The men broke into a tool house and 
got a crowbar, a clilsel and a ham- 
mer, unlocked the depot door and 
knocked off the dial of the safe. That 
the blowing of the safe was the work 
of professionals is shown by the clean 
manner of forcing the door which was 
not knocked from the hinges and 
nothing else was damaged. 



TELL UNCLE SAM 
ON TOBACCO MEN 

Ohioan Says Trust and So- 
ciety of Equity Are 
Blocking Trade. 

New Yorli, Oct. 16. — 'Conditions in 
the tobacco growing districts of Ken- 
tucky will be brought to the atten- 
tion of the United States govern- 
ment," said E. O. Eshelby of Cincin- 
nati here today. 

Mr. Eshelby is the publisher of the 



Cincinnati Comgtiercial Tribune and 
one of the leaders of the independent 
tobacco manH^fcturera. 

"Not oniy hws the .American To- 
bacco companyi; by the aid of the 
equity society, practically put an end 
to competition from th; independent 
manufacturers ••' said Eshelby. "but 
the renewed efforts of nhe leaders of 
the Burley society to form a new 
pool are being enforced by a recrudes- 
cence of night- riding." 
> 
Both Be^« Snced. 

Louis Boon, a leading merchant of 
Norwav. Mich., writes. "Three bottles 
of Foley's Honey and Tar absolutely 
cured my bov of a sever'* cough, and a 
neighbor's boy. who was so ill with a 
cold that tlie doctors ga\ e him up, was 
cured by taking Foley s Honey and 
Tar." Nothing else is as safe and cer- 
tain in results. 



YOUR LAST CHANCE 

take: in the bazaar givex by 

THE SVEA GLEE CLUB AT a023 
WEST SliPERIOR STREET. 

All grand prizes will be given away 
ToBiKJit. Admission, 10 cents. 



ODTY i^iEFS 



J 



I'riuting; an«l Buokbtndlac 

Thwlng-Slewart Co. 'Phones 114. 

Dr. A. B. Walker Hbm Moved 

To 2103 East First street Both 'phones. 
Duluth 'phone now 235-M. 
■ 
Northland Prlatery. 

Good printing. Call Zenith 494. 
■ 
Too Eager to Sell. 

Harry Rapport, a clerk in a Bowery 
clothing store, wa.s tined $10 and costs 
in police court yesterday on the charge 
of fighting with Elmer Bergwey, who 
was let off with a fine of $1 and costs. 
It is claimed that Bergweil stopped to 
look into the window and that Kapport 
induced him to come in. When he 
failed to make any purchase it Is al- 
leged that Kapport threw him into the 
street, where the two ware arrested. 

.^ T— — • 

Kew Teiunerauce Society Formed. 

The Toive'ii Talitj. Duhith. Minn.. No. 
12 T^mperdnce society, has been or- 
ganized and incorporated. The articles 
were ye.steVdav -filed wiUi the register 
of deeds. None but F innish persons 
over the age of 16 will be admitted to 
membership. The object of the society 
is to promote tiie cause of temperance. 

IndeQeiideat Church. 

At the Independent Disciple church. 
Knights of Pythias hall. B. V"". Black, 
pastor, win speak on "Social Re- 
in the morning at 10:45 a. m. 
8 p. m. {Sunday school will meet 
anti^.Oh.rJstian Endeavor at 7 



forms 
and at 
at l-^ 
p. m. 



Rev. J. Brewer IleturB*. 

Rev. Jonathan Brewer, pastor of 
St. Slark's Afro-American M. E. 
church, has returned from Moline, III., 
where he attended the Afro-American 
M. E. conference. The bishop who pre- 
sided at the conference assigned Rev. 
Mr. Brewer to the Duluth church for 
another year. 



Get Camerou'N 

upholstering. Both 



prlcffi on yonr 

■ph's. llo 1st ave 



w. 



"The Cure of OruinkenneMS." 

Rev. Bruce V. Black will .Sunday 
morning spoke on "The (^ure of Drunk- 
enness' at the regular Sunday services 
held at the Knights of Pythias hall. Mr. 
Black has been invtstigaling the 
methods u.-^ed in the Chicago missions 
during tlie^ past week. 

9 

The-.Spaldluic CafeH. 

Modern in every det.iil. Orchestra 
Sundav. Wednc-^day and Saturday even- 
ings (if each week during the dinner 

hour. 

• •>- , m — 

To Sefeot Pav«>nient. 

Prcpertv owners on East Fourth 
street, between Sixth and Fourteenth 
avenues east, will liold a meeting 
Monday afternoon at the office of the 
board "of public works in the city hall 
to decide upon the kind of pavement 
to be laid on the street next spring. 



Zenith iicnd lixtcd. 

A routine meeting of ihe directors of 

the Duluth exchange was held this 

noon. Zenith J.ead & Zinc was placed 

on tlie excliange'.s regular list. 

» 

GiicNtH at Laueheon. 

The members of Greysolon Duluth 
cliapter, D. A. R., will be the guests 
of Mrs. C. Keith of Piinceton. Minn., 
at a luncheon at.- the Spalding next 
Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 instead of 
at 2:30 as annouriced in the invita- 
tions. ' 






ID 



George E. Webb of A jrora is at the 
St. Louis. 

Mrs. John Healy of Hibbing is at 
the St. Louis. 

Charles Grenborough ot Ely Is at the 
St. Louis. 

Thomas Owens of Two Harbors is at 
the Spalding. 

Blanche Taplin of Bi^vabik is at the 
McKay. 

Mrs. William A. Thomas of Hibbing 
is at the McKay. 

E. J. Fulton and wife of Cass Lake 
are at the McKay. 

Mr.s. M. Loeb of Ligronier, Ind.. is 
visiting her son. Louis Loeb of 1123 
Kast Superior street. 



PRIZE ROLLER SKATING 

NEXT Tl'ESn.W 13VENING, 
Ofl'. Itt, »»«)», 

AT THE LIXCOLX PARK 
ROLLER RINK. 

Music by Marine Band. Three 
"rickets. 1'5 cent.;. 



prizes 



given. 



INDIAN OUTLAW 
TURNS SUICIDE 



Body of Willie Boy Is Found 
Summit of 



on 



Mountain. 



FOUR SWEAR 
COOKie 

More Affidavits on Mount 

McKinley Explint Are 

Publishei 



Guide and Hioti^apiier Are 

Among Those Who Deny 

the FeaL 



San Francisco. Cal.. Oct. 16. — Willie 
Boy. the Piute Indian for whom three 
armed posses- have been searching the 
San Bernardipo desert, was found dead 
yesterday on the summi: of the Bullion 
mountain, where he had been making 
his final stand. He had killed himself 
witli the last sUot in ills ritle, and had 
been dead several days 

Willie Boy rtiade his stand on the 
mountain again.st the pursuing posse 
of Slieriff Ralplis on the afternoon of 
Oct. 7. 

Among the Piute Indians, Willie 

Boy was rega>rded as a Lothario. On 

Sept. *J6 he murdered Mike Boniface, 

an aged Indian, and flel with the lat- 
ter'3 15-year-old daughier. Four days 
later the pursuing posse found the 
girl's diad body. She had been beaten 
and finally murdered w len she became 
too exhausted to keep up with her flee- 
ing lover. 

During the battle on Bullion moun- 
tain Willie Boy wounded tliree mem- 
bers of the posse. kllli>d three horses 
and finally forced them to abandon the 
attack until reinforcements were 
secured. 



New York, Oct. 16. — Four more af- 
fidavits were published today by the 
New York Globe in connection with 
the investigation of Dr. Frederick A. 
Cook's expedition to Mount McKinley. 
Three of them are by members of the 
Cook party — Fred Printz, a guide: 
Walter P. Miller, photographer, and 
Samuel Beecher. Their testimony re- 
lates in detail to movements of the 

party, explaining tliat Cook and Bar- 
rill were alone together in the period 
in which Dr. Cook claims to have 
readied the summit of Mount McKin- 
ley. All three say that Barrill as- 
sured them later that Dr. Cook's story 
was false. 

The fourth affidavit Is that of Dr. 
John E. Shore, a physician of Leaven- 
worth, Wash., who tells of a conver- 
sation with Oscar F. Blankenshlp of 
the United States forestry service, in 
which Blankenshlp said that Dr. Cook's 
claim.s to having climbed Mount Mc- 
Kinley were false, inasmuch as the 
feat was impossible in the short time 
during whicti Cook and Barrill were 
absent. Blankenshlp was located near 
Mount McKinley at tlie time Cook's ex- 
pedition was there. 

Prlnta*M Affidavit. 
The affidavit of Fred Printz, the 
guide, is dated Oct. 4. It says that 
at the time of Dr. Cook's alleged as- 
cent of the peak he and several others 
had been sent on a side trip to hunt 
specimens for the Smithsonian insti- 
tution. The afidavit continues: 

'Then the doctor picked up Dokken 
for a cook and taking Barrill, left in 
the launch for Shushitna station. From 
there, he said, they were going up 
Shushitna, up the Culitna, and uj) to 
tiie Tokositna to the head of naviga- 
tion, to explore the country for the 
route to Mount McKinley. 

"Miller and I returned to Shushitna 
station Sept. 11, wliere the doctor 
joined us with Barrill on Sept. 22, say- 
ing that they had made the summit of 
Mount McKinley. 

Money Still Due Him. 
"From there we left for home. On 
leaving the doctor at Seward he 
promised tliat part of my pay for the 
summer would be in Seattle for me, 
but on arriving there and not finding 
it, borrowed money to get home on. 
and having written tlie doctor several 
time.s since for the amount due, have 
received $100. leaving a balance of 
825 due me at this date. 

"In about one month after Barrill 
and J returned home from our trip 
with Dr. Cook in 1906, Barrill laughed 
and told me that he and Cook never 
got to the top of Mount McKinley," 

Walter P. Miller, the photographer, 
in his affidavit, says that he was with 
Printz on the side trip during the 
time in which Dr. Cook claims to have 
gone to the summit of the mountain. 
His testimony continues: 

"Dr. Cook and Barrill took the 
launch and went down the Yetna, an- 
nouncing their. Intention of ascending 
the Shusliitna, tlie Schuletna and ex- 
ploring the Talshetna glacier for a 
possible route for a future attempt to 
ascend to the summit of Mount Mc- 
Kinley. Printz and 1 returned to the 
Shushitna station; on the 22d of Sep- 
tember we met Dr. Cook and Barrill at 
the station, and tiience we all came to- 
gether to Seward. 

Barrill Only WItneHii. 
"I was called East by Henry Disston 
of Philadelphia, the backer of the ex- 
pedition, to wrhom 1 related all tli3 
circumstances of the trip. 

"So far as I am able to tell, Barrill 
is the only man who has personal 
knowledge as to whether or not Dr. 
Cook ascended to the summit of Mount 
McKinley. 

"In May, 1908. I met Edward N. Bar- 
rill at Missoula. Mont. He then in- 
formed me for the first time that he 
and Dr. Cook had never reached the 
summit of Mount McKinley. I then 
said to him, 'where were you?' when 
he remarked, 'We were only on the 
first ridge, this side of the mountain.' 
I asked him about his picture sho%vn 
opposite page 227 in Dr. Cook's book, 
when he replied: 'That is my picture, 
hut that is not the top of the moun- 
tain.' " 

Tlie affidavit of Samuel Beecher. 
after describing the early experience 
of the party, tells of a trip whicii he 
and several other members of the ex- 
pedition took from their "base camp." 
He says: "On July 23 we reached our 
nearest point to the mountain, the point 
being, as R. W. Porter said, fourteen 
miles from the" summit. On this trip 
we were mapping and taking observa- 
tions of the country. 

Not Above 7,000 Feet. 
"At our lasl camp ihe elevation was 
in the neighborhood of 5,000 feet, and 
from that point 1 could readily recog- 
nize all the pictures shown by Dr. Cook 
in his magazine article on llie ascent 
of th<» mountain, with tiie exception of 
the pictures shown as being the sum- 
mit and the one on page 830, wliich 
are such as might have been taken at 
elevations of 5,000 or 6,000 feet. 

"Pictures that I have recognized 
could' not have lieen taken at an ele- 
vation of above 7,000 feet. 

"The point located by Edward Barrill 
as being the point claimed as tiie top 
of Mount McKinley. from my position 
had an apparent elevation of approxi- 
mately 7,000 feet. 

"From our camp I had a view of 
nearlv the whole route as stated hy 
Edward Barrill. I was present at all 
times when Mr. Barrill made his affi- 
davit of even date herewith, and all 
the facts stated in his affidavit cover- 
ing the period I was with him are cor- 
rect. 

"From my point r^ view I recognized 
all tlie points mentioned by him, and 
from my knowledge of the conditions 
as existing there. It would have been 
impossible for the climb of the moun- 
tain to have been made in the time as 
claimed by Dr. Cook. 

Not Sore on Cook. 
"The rea.son for my making this affi- 
davit is not from any personal ani- 
mosity or ill will again Dr. Cook, but 
from a sense of justice to the public." 
John F. Shore's testimony is as fol- 
lows: 

"During the summer of 1907 I was 
conversing with Oscar F. Blankenshlp, 
I who told me that while near Mount 
I McKinley he knew of Dr. Cook's al- 
! leged a.scent of the mountain, but that 
I from his ver.v short absence from the 
I launch, it was impossible for him to 
I have made the ascent and return in 
1 that time. 

! "Blankenshlp is now a fore.stry serv- 
■ ice man at Stehkin. Wasli. Since hav- 
ing thi.s conversation I met S. P. 
Beecher and talked with him about the 
matter. He said to me: 'That is right.' 
but he said they were not saying much 
about the feat: that the ascent had 
never been really made." 



be present from the Duluth Commer- 
cial club J. Adam Bede and C. P. 
Craig will speak to the members of the 
organization. 

The open market question and gen- 
eral agricultural conditions in the 
county will be considered by the mem- 
bers of the club. 

MAY BE HALF 
HUNDRED DEAD 



COUNH FARMERS' 
CLUB TO MEET 



—NEW SHOW AT THE— 

Sunbeam 

SUNDAV, OCT. 17. 

This Week We Are Featurioi 

••THE PAY C A K . " 

A Beautiful Drama. 

The SUNBEAM ORCHESTRA 

ADMISSION, 10c. 



J. HICHAID, 



Slanncer 



Tra9 of Havoc Is Left By 

the Storm in the 

South. 

Memphis, Tenn., Oct. 16. — With the 
known death list already reaching a 
total of 37, and with thirteen others 
reported dead; with scores seriously 
injured and many others painfully 
bruised, and with the property dam- 
age running to $1,000,000 or more, the 
havoc and destruction of the storm, 
which swept Middle and West Tenn- 
essee, Alabama, Georgia and portions 
of Arkansas and South Carolina 
Thursday afternoon and evening, 
grows hourly as reports are received 
from remote points and as normal 
wire communication is gradually be- 
ing resumed. 

The storm probably was the worst ^ 
that has visited this section of the 
South in years, being intense in its 
destroying fury and widespread in its 
area. Halves of counties were laid 
in waste and ruin. Towns were de- 
stroyed, plantations were greatly dam- 
aged and from all sections of the 
storm-swept area come reports of loss 
of life, ruin and desolation. 

At Stantonville, Tenn., thirteen peo- 
ple are reported killed, but the report 
lacks confirmation. 

Fire Heishtens DLsaster. 

While only one death occurred at 
Denmark, Tenn., the horrors of the 
storm there were greatly heightened 
by the fire which started amid the 
ruins and debris of wiiat was once a 
flourishing little town in middle Tenn- 
essee. The fierce ilameo, unquenched 
by the heavy downpour of rain and 
hail, rapidly consumed what few 
dwellings and storehouses were left 
standing. Two hundred people were 
rendered homeless and have appealed 
to neighboring towns and cities for 
immediate aid. 

Many handsome and imposing 
statues in the national park were 
torn from the pedestals and the prop- 
erty damage estimated at $100,000. 
Memphis escaped unscathed. 



FIVE SALOONS GO 
our OF BUSINESS 

Judge Morris' Decision Has 

Immediate Effect in 

Walker. 

Walker, Minn., Oct. IG. — (Special to 
The Herald. J — Five of Walker's seven 

saloon men will relinquish their li- 
censes to the village ccuncil tliis even- 
ing, and tw J saloons will have thr- il?hl 
hert- from now on at a raise in license 
of from JOOO to |1.S00. 

I'pon lf»arning of the deci.'^ion of 
Federal .Judge Morris at Duluth yea- 
terdaj'. the saloon men began filling 
boxes with their surplu.^ liquor, and 
no sign of Walker's seven saloons will 
be in evidence tomorrow, the day set 
hy the government to cease business. 
The two men granted licenses are L.. 
H. Chase and J. A. Carlson. Both full 
bloods and breeds will be refused 
liquor in Walker after this. 



T 







MXETY-THKEE DEAD 

IN SOUTHERN STOIiM. 



16. — * 



Na.sliville, Tenn.. Oct. 
JMjriircs received today ishow that 
iiinety-tlirce per.soii.s were kllletl 
and 100 injured by the tornado in 
Tenuessee. Alabama and Georjfia. 



* 




fol Henry 11. HarrU, third assistant 
postmaster general during the fir.sL 
Cleveland administrtaion. died Friday 
at liis home in Odessa Dale. Ga. He 
was 84 years old. 



What would 
out its stores? 
paper he like 
One would be 
the other. 



this city l)e like with- 

W^hat would this news- 

without its store ads? 

about as interesting as 



MAKER OF MONUMENT 
TO ITALIAN EMPEROR 




ETTORE XIMENES. 

Sculptor who made the statue of 
Giovannia da Verrazzano. which re- 
cently was unveiled on the site along 
the Hudson which, the Italians claim, 
was discovered by Verrazzano before 
Henry Hudson came to this side of the 
world. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Tlian 15 Centa. 

REMKMBER^THAT THE LA DELL A 
and Alvaro are home-made cigars. 

It's never too late to have Cameron re- 
upholster your furniture. Both 
'phones. Shop, 123 First avenue W. 

FOR SALE— H01'SP:H0L1> GOOD.S TO 
fompletel.v furnish four rooms, at 312 
East First street. ■ 

FOR RENT— FINE MODERN HEATED 
six-room Hat, central lo«ation: $42.50- 
per month. Apply at Ma.ss. Ileal Ks- 
tate company, IS i'hoenix bloik. 

HAIRS, moles! warts REMOVED 
by electricity. Snampooing, mani- 
curing. Full line of hair goods. Mlsa 
Kelly, over Suffel's. 

' marriage'licenses^ 

John Peterson and Oline Moe, both 
of St. Louis county. 

Reldar Holmljoe and Ruth Sorenson. 
both of St. Louis county. 

Matthew Vcale and Alice Beagle, 
both of St. Louis county. 

John Stanke and Barbara Flumas. 
both of St. Louis county. 

Arthur F. Eastman and Bertha May 
Brewster, both of St. Loui.s county. 

BIRTHS. 

McDonald — a daugliter wa.s l)orn to 
Mr. and Mrs. .lames A. McDonald of 
510 East Third .sUee.t. Oct. 13. 

RO.S.S — A son was born to Mr. and Mr.-". 
John G. KoHS of l'J7 South Ninth 
avenue east, Oct. 9. 

FINDLAY — A daughter was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. .James Findlay of 401 
Lewis street. Oct. 11. ■ 

BOYLE— A daughter was horn to Mr. 
and Mrs. Patrick Boyle of I'S Fourth 
avenue east, Oct. 1. ^ 

JDEATHS:^ 

FINMAN — Knut A. Finman. 21 years of 
age, died Oct. 13 at 3i. Mary's hos- 
pital. 

FRAME — Suslan V. Fram«». 69 years 
old of 29 Orunge street, died Oct. 13. 

STARKEY — Mary J Starkey. 81 years 
old of 31S Ninth avenue east, died 
O ct'. 15. 

CARD OF THANKS. 

WE DESIRE TO EXPRESS OUR SIN- 
cere thanks to the many friends wlio 
shared sympathy during our late 
bereavement the death of wife and 
mother Carolina 
MR. THOS. WHITE AND FAMILY. 

loos Park Point. 

BUILDING PERMITS. 

To Marie Diettrich, frame 
dwelling on East Fifth street 
between Twelfth and Thir- 
teenth avenues I 2,000 

To Mrs. E. Youngdahl, frame 
dwelling on Seven and One- 
half avenue west between 
Second and Third avenues.. 1.000 

To Lydia I>. Brown. frame 
dwelling on Winona street 
and Woodland avenue 1.000 

To Conrad Lorlain, frame 
dwelling on East Tenth 
street between Twelfth and 
Thirteenth avenues 1,000 

To H. F. Berbig, frame dwell- 
ing on Lake avenue 2,000 

To Lakeside I^and company, 
frame dwelling on Tioga 
street and Fifty-eighth ave- 
nue 2.500 

To Percy R. Thomas, frame 

addition 2.000 



MARSHALL FIELD said: 

"Money is the only thing that keeps you an independent 
man. Is the only preventive against poverty and depend- 
ence. Keep yourself free, by making yourself independent. 
That means saving a portion of every earned dollar." 

Start a savings account with us today, upon 
which we pay 3 per cent compound inter- 
terest semi-annually. $1.00 will start you. 

j^ orthern jy ational Qank 

NO. 220 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. ' 









,X- «A- '^ "^ Uf - Jl f * 4c jir tX. slf sii- sir >if ^ 'A' \tr Of \^ sJj-Of U^ 



A meetina- of the countv farmers' 
club will be held in Hibbing Tuesday 
evening. C P. Craig, W. I. Prince» H. 
V. Eva, J. S. Pardft* and others will 



Odf New Invention Enables Us to Supply Teeth 

Which are as good as natural teeth in every respect, at a fraction 
of the old-time cost. fp-to-date methods and scientific mastery of 
details have reduced the cost very materially, and at the same time 
have eliminated the objectionable and fraught-witli-fear features 
which made people defer a visit to a dentist. 

Wp" make artificial teeth without the use of a plate. We can 
transform a badly shaped mouth into a pretty one. We can do 
the best work that expert dental science has evolved. 

EXAMINATION ANU C ONSITLTATION FREK. 

STORER. DENTALr CO., 

OVEK FIVE AND TEN-CENT STOKE. 



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THE 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 'isf09: 




OiTfrU 




-n fW" 



FOUR SHOTS 
WEREHRED 

Only One Took Effect Dur- 
ing the Ely Shooting 
Affray. 

The Principals Said to Have 

Been Rivals for a 

Woman. 



Ely. Minn.. Oct. 16.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — Joseph Fortune who was 
shot early yesterday morning by 
Harry Eddy a local switchman during 
a fight in Billy Macks restaurant had 
a bad night last night and his condi- 
tion is considered very serious today, 
although the surgeons have not entire- 
ly abandoned hope. 

Eddy liad a preliminary hearing to- 
day before .ludge Jury and was held 
to' the grand jury on the charge of 
assault. He will be taken to the 
countv jail at IHjlutli tomorrow. 

In the event Fortune dies the charge 
will, of course, be changed to murder. 
Foafckt Ov«r V> oniaa. 

LAter developments indicate that the 
shooting was the result of the two 
men being rivals for the affections of 
a married woman living here. Both 
men are said to have been paying as- 
siduous attention to lier and both had 
been drinking when they met in the 
rtstiiurant. They had some words and 
Fortune, who Is a six-footer, and con- 
slderablv larger than Eddy, i.s said to 
have struck Ediiv. blacking both of Ills 
eves Eddv drew his pistol and fired 
fiuir sIioti='. The first took effect and 
tlie other three went wild, but for- 
tunatelv did no more damage tlian to 
burv themselves in the wall. There 
werV some other people in the 
restaurant at tlie lime and they scam- 
pered from the scene of battle while 
great excitement reigned. 

Eddy left alter the shooting going 
to his father's house, where he lived 
and to bed. As soon as officers lo- 
cated him they placed him under ar- 
rest Meanwhile Fortune was hurried 
to the Old Shipman hospital where, as 
stated in yesterday's Herald, the bul- 
let wa«! removed fmm its lodgment in 
his back and since then he has been in 
a critical condition. 



noon for Chicago, where she will spend 
the winter with friends and relatives. 

Harry Burnham was in Duluth on 
business this week. 

Miss Laura Dieson. telegraph oper- 
ator at the Great Northern station in 
thi.s citv, spent Wednesday and Thurs- 
dav with relatives in Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sheehy and daugh- 
ter returned home Thursday evening 
from a month's tour of many of the 
West and Central states. They report 
having a fine time and being thorough- 
ly entertaine d all through th e journey. 

TWO COIPLES WEDDED. 

Deer River and Town of Blackberry 
Couples Joined for Life. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., Oct. 16. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — John G. 
Sutherland and Miss Jennie Hoagland 
were married Tuesday by Rev. L. W. 
Gullstrom. pastor of the Swedish l.u- 
theran church, at his residence in this 
city. The contracting parties are 
both well known young people of the 
town of Blackberry, where they have 
made their home for some lime. They 
left the same day for a wedding trip, 
which will include a tour of the West. 
A verv prettv wedding was solem- 
nized T'liesday at the St. Benedict's 
hospital chapel, when Fred Betts and 
Miss Laura O'Connell, both of Deer 
River, were united in marriage by 
Rev. Father Turbeaux, the hospital 
chaplain and pastor of the Deer River 
Catholic church. The wedding took 
place at 9 o'clock a. m., in the pres- 
ence of only the witnesses, the wed- 
ding being a very fjuiet affair. 

John O'Connell, a brother of the 
bride, and his wife, attended th? pair. 
Mr. and Mrs. Betts left on the after- 
noon train Tuesday for a brief wed- 
ding visit at Duluth. Mr. Betts is a 
prominent and popular young bust- 
ness man of Deer River, where he 
had made his home during the past 
six voars. The bride has been a 
resident of Deer River for the past 
two vears, during which time she 
made' her home with her brother andj 
family. 



now being heated with steam, and 
much of the machinery is being run 
bv electricity, making the shop one 
of the most modern and biggest of iiS 
kind on the range. In the new ad- 
dition, carriages will be made ana re- 
paired. 



RECEPTION FOR 
THEIR PASTOR 

Ladies of the Hibbing M. E. 

Cburch Plan Pleasant 

Social Event. 

Hibbing. Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
Tbe Herald. —The ladies of the Metiio- 
dist church have planned to give a re- 
ception In the church parlors of the 
church on next Tuesday evening in 
honor of Rev. and Mrs. J. F. Pickard 
who have been successfully connected 
with the church for the past year. Mr. 
Pickard was recently appointed to 
succeed himself as pastor of the M. fc.. 
church bv the conference in Duluth. 

O J. Tucker has undertaken to dis- 
pose of a number of tickets for the 
banquet that will be given on the even- 
ing of Oct. 19 by the Commercial club 
of this citv in honor of the members 
of the County club, and the meeting 
will be financed by the sale of the ban- 
quet tickets. The entertainment of the 
club is up to the business men of the 
city and the Commercial club hopes 
there will be a large sale of tickets. 

J J. Cox. J. L. Stewart and L. C. 
Kleffman left yesterday morning for a 
weeks trip in the duck country. They 
left by the Great Northern and went by 
rail as far as Deer River, where a 
launch was in waiting for them, and 
they proceeded by water thirty miles 
up the Mississippi and Leech rivers to 
Mud lake. From reports from that dis- 
trict thev should have a full sack of 
game when they make the homeward 
Journey. , „. , ^ 

Dr. Morseman returned Wednesaay 
evening from Winona, where he at- 
tended the Minnesota State Sanitary 
conference. , . ,. 

Miss Florence Murray left this after- 



NEW MU(JmA HOTEL. 

Brewing Company Has Practically 
Decided Upon Its Plans. 

Virginia, Minn.. Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Hamm Brewing 
company of St. Paul has practically 
completed arrangements for the build- 
ing of a large hotel in Virginia. J. C. 
Mueller, a representative of the com- 
pany, is now in the city and with the 
coinpany's local representative, Alex 
Keller the hotel proposition was gone 
over thoroughly. It is the '"}€"* 'O" 
of the company to erect a building at 
the corner of Chestnut street and Cen- 
tral avenue northwest, the location be- 
ing opposite the Fay hotel. The struc- 
ture will be 50 by 125 feet three 
stories high. The lobby and grill 
rooms will face Central avenue and 
the upper floors will be partitioned off 
into commodious rooms for the accom- 
modation of the traveling public. "The 
hotel will have about seventy-five 
guest rooms, and will be equipped 
throughout in modern style. Work of 
excavation will be begun at once, and 
if the weather is favorable work on 
the superstructure will be commenced 
as soon as tlie foundation is laid. The 
total cost will be between foO.OOO and 
175,000. 



MONTENEGRINS 
SMASH THINGS 

— 

Run Amuck in Biwabik Saloon 

With Disastrous 

Results. 

Blwablk, Minn.. (3ct. 16— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Led by Tony Bochedt, 
kuown as the "King of the Montene- 
grins," two other members of that 
race. Mike Bakisli and Uodo\-an Bjoatt, 
went on a rampage in Hyman Morco's 
saloon one afternoon recently, and 
wlien thev got through they liad suc- 
ceeded in smashing a large amount or 
plate glass and other glass and wreck- 
ing thingls generally. 

Ordered to leave the place, they 
smashed the stove, and before being 
ejected made the plate glass in the 
place look as though a big shell nad 
burst in the room. .,,i„i„„„ 

They pleaded guilty to the maliclovjs 
destruction of property and were al- 
lowed to go upon payment for ine 
destruction of the property, amounting 
in all to $120.10. 

SOCIAL WHIRL 

IN VIRGINIA 

Two Bridge Parties and 

Other Events During 

the Week. 



Disease Germ s 

Cannot harm healthy human 
bodies. Wo cannot have healthy 
bodies unless we have pure blood, 
-the kind of blood that Hood's 
Sarsaparilla malces. 

This great medicine has an un- 
equalled, unapproached record for puri- 
fying and enriching the blood. 

It cures scrofula, eczema, eruptions, 
catarrh, rheumatism, anemia, nervous- 
ness, that tired feeling, dyspepfiia, loss 
of appetite, general debility, and builds 

up the whole system. .,.,,, 

Get it todar in the usual hqnid form or m 
«bocolat«d Ublet form called SarwUb*. 



pressions she made on other trips to 
this city she aught to b« greeted with 
a record audience. 

PRESIDENTS OF SISTER 

NATIONS SET PRECEDENT 

(Continued from page 1.) 



This Trade-mark 



ducks and geese, and Mrs. Bailey to 
visit her relatives. 

Information has reached here that 
Charles C. Butler. Jr., who is attend- 
ing the university at Madison. Wis. 
has recovered from his recent attack of 
typhoid fever and is again aitending 
to his studies. _ 

BIWABIK DEPOT IS 

BEING OVERHAULED. 

Biwabik. Minn.. Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Work has been progress- 
ing for some davs on the alterations 
and changes in the Mlssabe depot, oyer 
which rooms are to be provided for the 

"^These living rooms will be modern 
In all particulars and will give the 
agent here a nice home. J. F Toeller 
is now the agent, and will make his 
home here. ^^___^____ 

DRILLING GOING ON. 



YOUNG EVELETH MEN 

OF MUSCLE PLAN CLUB. 



RHEUMATISM 

Don't Take Medicine 

But let us send you the New 

Michigan $1 Extern*! Cure 

ON FREE TRIAL 



Eveleth, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The idea of organizing 
an athletic club meets with favor. The 
headquarters of the club will in all 
probability be located in the basement 
of the M. E. church, where a gym- 
nasium, shower baths and meeting 
room are now provided for. 

A meeting, just held, was presided 
over by Rev. Johnson, pastor of the 
M. E. church, who has had consider- 
able athletic experience. All present 
were in favor of finding suitable quar- 
ters and to have a club, and a big 
meeting of interested young people 
will be held in the very near future 
for the purpose of working out details 
of the organi zation. 

VIRGINIA CONTRIBUTING 
TOWARDS JOHNSON FUND. 

Virginia, Minn., Oct. 16.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Subscriptions to the 
Johnson memorial fund are being re- 
ceived at the First National bank. 

The following have thus far con- 
tributed to the fund, each giving $1: 

C. B. Lenont, A. Keller, Julius San- 
deling, E. C. A. Johnson. A. E. Moilan, 
O. A. Poirier, J. W. Murphy, A. N. 
Thompson, A. C. Osborn, M. Boylan, 

D. W. Elmquist. Lafayette Bliss, 
George Shea, A. W. Norton, Marcus 
Norton, Charles S. Norton and W. E. 
Hannaford. 

HELP UNFORTUNATE 

WOMAN IN EVELETH. 



Please Send Your Address 

Return mail will bring you a regular 
'^ dollar pair of Magic Foot Drafts, the 
great Michigan External Cure for 
Rheumatism (no matter where locat- 
ed, how severe or whether it is 
chronic, acute, muscular, sciatic, lum- 
bago or gout, etc.) to try FRLE. 




Eveleth, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Rev. R. C. Johnson, 
Mavor Smith, Judge Prince and 
others became interested in the case 
of Susie Burns, an unfortunate wom- 
an, said to be a drug fiend, who ap- 
plied at the city jail for shelter. 
They learned she had friends in Supe- 
rior, who would care for her, and 
raised sufficient money to pay her ex- 
penses there 



Virginia, Minn., Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Mrs. A. C. Osborn enter- 
tained Friday afternoon at bridge for 
Mrs. W. E. Harwood of Eveleth and 
Mrs. D. B. McDonald of Duluth. The 
guests of honor both received beautiful 
guests' gifts. Mrs. D. E. Cuppernull 
won the bridge favor and Mrs. B. K. 
Smith captured the llinch prize. The 
guests from out-of-town were: Mes- 
danies Whitman. Kingston, Marseil, 
Smith. Mclnnis. Campbell, Harwood of 
Eveleth and Mrs. D. B. McDonald of 

Mrs B. F. Smith and daugTiter, Mrs. 
C V Malmgren, entertained a party 
of thirtv ladles at bridge and flinch 
Friday afternoon at the Fay liotel. The 
favors were won by Mrs. C. W. Miller 
and Mrs. J. L. Kimball. 

A free temperance lecture will be 
given at the Swedish Methodist churcli 
Sunday evening, the subject being, 
"Gain or Loss." . ^ ^ » 

Thomas Flannagan, superintendent 
of the Pettlt mine of the Republic Iron 
& Steel company, and sister, Mrs. Eu- 
gene V. Cassidy of this city, are en- 
i.jving a visit this week from Wieir 
mother Mrs. Thomas Flannagan. and 
sister, Mrs. Mayme Schumacher, of 
Ishpeming, Mich. 

Mrs. B. F. Smith will leave Sunday 
for a ten days' visit with her mother 
at Sioux City, loka, and with her 
daughter. Miss Bertha Smith, In Min- 
neapolis. ,, • ^ T^ 

Virginia Grove. No. 46, U. A. O. D., 
will entertain at another of their en- 
jovable hops at North Pole hall on 
Wednesday evening next. 

M F Fanning returned Wednesday 
from St. Paul, where he had been In 
attendance at the meeting of the grand 
chapter, R. A. M., as a delegate from 
Virginia Chapter, No. 77. 

Otto Manlnen of Ely has purchased 
a site on Mesaba avenue and will at 
once begin the building of a factory 
for the manufacture of soft drinks. 

Mesdames A. B. Coates. C. V. Malm- 
gren. M. E. Fanning and J. D. Lamont 
attended a luncheon at Biwabik on 
Wednesday, given by Mrs. Fred Lerch. 
Mrs. W. C. Agnew of Duluth was the 
guest of honor. , ^ ., , i 

Rev. Dr. Wilcox and family arrived 
in the city from Detroit. Minn., last 
(vening, and are at the Hotel Fay, 
pending a completion of improvements 
at the M. E. parsonage. 

CJeorge Hastings, who is in charge 
of the -operations of ine White Cedar 
Lumber company at Deer River, was 
home for a few days the first of tlic 
week. „, 

Mr.''. Fred Lerch of Blwablk wa.s a 
guest Thursday at the home of Mrs. 

B. F. Smith. . ., , . - *, 

The Young Peoples Society of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church will meet 
with Martin Nilson, Beech street, next 
Thursday evening. 

Members of Virginia Aerie No, 107. 
F O. E.. are requested to meet at their 
ball Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock, to 
attend the funeral of Brother Charles 
Winchester at Eveleth. 

The Ladies' Aid of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church will meet with Mrs. 
F. Wiren next Wednesday afternoon at 
■'■'0 

""mIss Katherlne Moore of Minneapolis 
is a guest at the home of her sister, 
Mrs. Arthur Hearn. 

Miss Susan Pratt entertained 
Wednesday afternoon for Mrs. R. 
Given of Bemldjl. 

Charley Walker, who owns one of 
the prettiest farms along the line of 
the Duluth, Virginia & Rainy Lake 
railway, was in the city Wednesday. 
Mr Walker expects to spend the win- 
ter months at Kinross, where he will 
be employed with the Northern Lumber 

company. „ ^ „ ,, * j 

Mr and Mrs. R. R. Bailey returned 

Friday evening from a trip to Lakoia, 

N U. Mr. Bailey went in quest of 



Searching? for Ore on Forty Just 
South of Biwabik Mine. 

Biwabik, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — St. Clair drills have 
during the past few days been placed 
on the forty just south of the Bi- 
wabik mine office and superintend- 
ent's dwelling. 

This is taken to mean that this 
property is to be thoroughly and defi- 
nitely explored at this time. This is 
the land on which Biwabik should 
naturally grow, if there is no ore, and 
it is to be hoped that the fee owners 
will this time decide whether or not 
there is any use of holding it longer 
without platting. 

There has been dirilling on this 
land before, but it did not proceed 
to an extent where it can be said 
that a thoorugh exploration was 

made. ^ . 

Herman Anderson, who has been 
doing contract work during the year, 
has gone to the farming country to 
do some work for Y. E. Anderson, 
whose dwelling he is overhauling and 
repairing. 






FREDERICK DYEll Ci rresp. Sec'y. 

Th«i If they brliiK 50U relief and comfort. If you 
are fully saU-fled wltli the l^ntfit recelval. send 
us One I>oU.if. If not, they lost you nothing. We 
taite your word. You can see that only a sure 
and powerful, yet perfectly harmless and pleasant 
rtimdy. (■ ul<l M«r l.e .--old on .-i plan lilse this 

Magie Foot Or«ft« TMoei»«« / 

are ace mpli--luna 
cures nothing shi-rt 
of marvelous all ovi-r 
world, afttr doctors 
and laths and medi- 
cine had fi>lie<l— after 
30 and 40 ytare' suf- 
fillng. Don't full to try thvni 
cent di) you p.iy unlets s.iUsfied - „, . 

Co.. K0 42 Oliver Buildiai. Jaeluan, Mich 
BO money— write todaj* — ••*- 



1 




at fii'-e Not one 

Macio Foct Draft 

Seud 



OLD GRAND RAPIDS 

CITIZEN TO HIS REWARD. 

Grand Rapids Minn., Oct. 16.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— B. E. Runnel.s, an 
old and respected citizen of this city 
died Monday after an illness lasting 
over a period of years, resulting from 
a fall which he had several years ago. 
•-r Runnels has always been able to 
be "about until lately when he was 
stricken by typhoid which took him 
off Monday night. Mr. Runnels is sur- 
vived by his wife. 

The funeral was held Thursday un- 
der the auspices of the 1. O. O. F. 
lodge in this city and Interment was 
made in Itasca cemetery. 

ANOTH ER HIBBlNfi OLD- 

TIMER BORNE TO GRAVE. 

HiblUng. Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — James EiTmatlnger died 
at 6 o'clock Wednesday morning and 
the funeral was held yesterday. Mr. 
Ermatinger was 52 years old and he 
has bL-en complaining of complicated 
troubles for the past year. 

The deceased leaves a wife and eight 
children. Mr. Ermatinger was one 
of tlie earliest settlers of the village 
having arrived when Hibbing was a 
bunch of stumps, about fourteen years 
ago. 

o 
Kveleth Concern (irow.s. 
Eveleth, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special 

to The Herald. The new concrete 

addition to the Murray blacksmith 
and carriage shop recently complet2d, 
at a cost of $1,000, is one story and 
a half high. The entire building is 



To Etfijoy 



the fiill confidence of the Well-Infonned 
of the World and the Commendation of 
the most eminent physicians it was essen- 
tial that the component parts of Syrup 
of Figs and Elixir of Senna shotild be 
known to and approved by them; there- 
fore, the California Fig Syrup Co. pub- 
lishes a full statement with every package. 
The perfect purity and tmiforraity of pro- 
duct, which they demand in a laxative 
remedy of an ethical character, are assured 
by the Company's original method of man- 
ufacttire known to the Company only. 

The figs of California are used in the 
production of Syrup of Figs and Elixir of 
Senna to promote the pleasant taste, but 
the medicinal principles are obtained from 
plants known to act most beneficially. 

To get its beneficial effects always buy 
the genuine — manufactured by the Cali- 
fornia Fig Syrup Co. only, and for sale 
by all leading druggists. 



BUILDING NEW ROADS. 

Highways Tributary to Grand Rap- 
ids That Will Benefit Public. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., Oct. 16.— (Spe- 
cial to Tlie Herald.) — Three prominent 
townships roads and one county road 
in this Immediate neighborhood are 
now either completed or nearing com- 
pletion. 

The Lilly Lake road, which starts a 
short distance south of the pest house, 
and continues for a mile and a half 
south, is about to be completed. 

Considerable work has Leen done 
on the road running straight, south of 
the southeast corner of the Doran farm. 
Several fanners will be accommodated 
by the opening of this road. 

Al Garlng has about completed the 
construction of the road known as the 
Horseshoe Lake road. That road leaves 
the Pokegama Lake road at the Hewls 
place, and runs south for a mile and a 
quarter. Ihe three roads mentioned 
in the foregoing are township roads. 

A road which Is nearing completion, 
which Is being built by the county, is 
the Cohasset road. This road has been 
in awful shape for years, ami the com- 
pletion is regarded as about the best 
thing that could happen by those hav- 
ling occasion to drive over the road. 

FAREWELL CONCERT AT 

VIRGINIA TUESDAY. 

Virginia, Minn., Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — A farewell concert will 
be given at the Fay opera ;iouse next 
Thursday evening, by Luther and Joel 
Hanson, assisted by Professors W alter 
Smith of Duluth and O. R. Olsen of 
Hibbing. The Messrs. Hanson will 
soon take up their residen<.>e In Min- 
neapolis and will not be .-^een again 
In Virginia for some time. Tlie young 
men were raised in Virginia and are 
hlglily sp oken of in the world of music. 

COURT QUARTERS TO 

BE HAD IN EVELETH. 



Virginia, Minn.. Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — County Commissioner 
Mclnnis was in from Eveleth yester- 
day, sizing up tlie progress of the Im- 
provements on the city hall bui ding to 
learn whether the building will be in 
shape to properly house the range 
court at the next session to convene on 
Tuesday. Oct. 26. 

The city hall building may not be 
in shape for the accommodtition of the 
court, but if not suitable quarters will 
be provid ed elsewhere in tie city. 

McKINLEY TO SOON 

HAVE ELECTRIC PLANT. 

McKlnley, Minn., Oct. 16.--(Special to 
The Herald.)— McKlnley village Is to 
have electric lights In the very near 

'flit lire 

Tuesday evening a contract was let 
to the Fairbanks-Morse cr mpany and 
directly after it is known that the 
bond issue has been accepted, ship- 
ment win be ordered. 

At the Tuesday evening council 
meeting this course was decided upon 
Fairbanks-Morse made the lowest bid 
at $1,297. this being to deliver the 
dynamo f. o. b. McKlnley. 
■ 
ChlMbolm NiBh*, ««•>«»»• , , , 
Chisholm. Minn., Oct. 16. -(Special to 
The Herald.)— Under the direction of 
Supt. J. S. Vaughan a nlglU school has 
been opened in Chisholm for the bene- 
fit of the foreign speaking portion of 
our citizenship, who desire to acquaint 
themselves with the English language 
and the simpler rudiments of our his- 
tory and political institutions. 

> ■ 

New Virelnla MinNter. 
Virginia, Minn., Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The members of the 
Swedish Lutheran church expect a new 
clergyman about the first of the year 
to flli the vacancy made by the resig- 
nation of Rev. P. O. Hanson. Rej. 
Karlberg of Sweden has received the 
rail and the church board expect to 
receive a favorable reply from him In 
fhP near future. Rev. Karlberg was 
If onf time stationed at Olivia, thl-s 
9tate but left a few moi ths ago foi 
his native country where he expected 
to remain. 



Nexv Eveleth Grocery. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Another grocery will 
soon be add-l to the large number of 
firms now ..gaged in that business 
here that of Banberg Brr,.s. Theodore 
and Frank, in the Pentllla building. 



across the border on behalf of Presi- 
dent Taft. 

President Diaz rode to the meeting 
with President Taft this morning over 
streets that were lined with soldiers, 
3,000 regular troops having been aug- 
mented by the Natonal Guard. Troops 
surrounded tlie chamber of commerce 
i building during the time that Presi- 
dent Diaz was there. 

I Members of the two parties formally 
were Introduced and exchanged court- 
esies in the corridors and main rooms 
of the chamber of commerce while 
President Diaz and President Taft 
were in tlie directors' rooms. 

AddreMseM of Cordiality. 
The addresses were formal, but 
cordial in character. The underlying 
idea of the meeting was to make it an 
informal celebration of the cordial re- 
lations existing between the two coun- 
tries. . , . 

While President Taft was attired in 
the simplicity ofthe conventional frock 
suit. President Diaz presented a strik- 
ing contrast in full uniform, gold lace 
glittering at his throat and decora- 
tions covering his left breast. 

The journeving to and fro of the two 
executives and the members of their 
party was attended by a military dis- 
play, which was impressive of author- 
ity. The escort of the president of the 
United States consisted of two 
s(|uadrons of the Third cavalry, bat- 
teries A, B and C of tlie Third Field 
artillerv and the Ninth Infantry from 
Fort Sam Houston, Tex., all under the 
command of Gen. Albert L. Meyer of 
the department of Texa.s, who was ac- 
companied by his staff and the head- 
quarters band. 

Attended By Soldiers. 
President Diaz was attended by 3.000 
Mexican soldiers. For the purposes of 
the meeting todav the entire interna- 
tional bridge spanning the Rio Grande 
was guarded as neutral territory. 
Tliis permitted the Mexican troops to 
accompany their president to the 
American end of the bridge, while slm- 
llarlv the escort of the regular army 
attending President Taft was permitted 
to proceed directly to the border line 
of Mexico. 

Tlie cities of El Paso and Juarez 
were gaily decorated. American and 
.Mexican flags were everywhere en- 
twined. The occasion was made a holi- 
day and excursions were run from hun- 
dreds of miles around. 

President Taft arrived in El Paso 
shortly after t o'clock tins morning. 
His train wa.s met at tlie city limits by 
an escort of cavalry, and tlie soldiers 
galloped along behind it as it was 
drawn slowly into tlie very center of 
the city. Soon after his arrival the 
president was escorted into the St 
Regis hotel, to be the g uest of the El 
Paso Chamber of Commerce. 

Keeelved Sriiool Cliildren. 
The breakfast was entirely of an in- 
formal character, and when it ended 
the president went to San Jacinto square 
to review the school children of the 
city, wlio were massed there and who 
sang "America" as he arrived. From 
San Jacinto square President Taft pro- 
ceeded to the chaml)er of commerce to 
await the coming of President Dia^, the 
latter having arrived yesterday at 
Juarez. 

The coming of the Mexican executive, 
whose temporary <iuitting of ills own 
territory necessitated the sanction of 
the congress of the republic, was sig- 
nalled by the booming of twenty-one 
guns when President Diaz, arrived at 
the American border-line. He was at- 
tended by a military escort, in full 
dress uniform. The salute was fired 
by the American forces. 

Secretary of "War Dickinson met 
President Diaz es the personal repre- 
sentative of the president of the United 
State.". 

Welcome \o Diaz. 
President Diaz, gray and grizzled, 
looking every inch a soldier and a 
flgliter, alighted from his gold-trimmed 
carriage of state and entered an 
American equipage plainly simple. 
Brig. Gen. Meyer accompanied Secre- 
tary Dickinson to greet the Mexican 
president. _ 

Governor Campbell of Texas also pro- 
ceeded to the border formally to wel- 
come the Mexican executive to the 
state. Tiie mayor of the city com- 
pleted the welcoming party. 

When President Diaz's carriage 
came to a standstill at the entrance 
to the city. Secretary Dickinson, Gov- 
ernor Campbell and the mayor proceed- 
ed to a point beside the equipage and 
shook hands with the distinguished 
visitor, while the American band 
played the Mexican national air, "La 
Paloma," 

The escorts of the United States 
troops then proceeded to conduct 
President Diaz to President Taft at 
the Chamber of Commerce. The streets 
througli which the Mexican executive 
and escort passed were lined with 
thousands of clieering people from time 
to time breaking into cheers. 
Texas troops guarded the way. 
Ouly Two Cabinet Menibem. 
rapt. Archibald W. Butt, military 
aide to President Taft, met the car- 
riage containing President Diaz as it 
drew up in front of the house and as- 
sisted in escorting him to the president 
of the United States. The only cabi- 
net officers attending President Taft 
today were Secretary of War Dickin- 
son and Postmaster General Hitchcock. 
After the meeting had occurred and 
light lunch had been served. Presi- 
dent Diaz withdrew in the same man- 
ner as he had come, being escorted 
back to the portals of the city, where 
the same courtesies as had marked 
his arrival attended his departure. As 
he again entered his own carriage, a 
parting salute of twenty-one guns was 
fired. 

The American troops returned to the 
Chamber of Commerce building and 
prepared to escort President Taft over 
the same route President Diaz had 
traveled. , . ,, . 

As Mr. Taft touched Mexican soil he 
was greeted by members of President 
Diaz's cabinet, and conducted from 
his own carriage Into an equipage 
placed at liis disposal by the Mexican 
republic, and was saluted by twenty- 
one guns from the Mexican artillery. 
Taft Visited Mexico. 
When President Taft alighted from 
his carriage on Mexican soil It was the 
second time in the history of the 
United States that a president of the 
United States had left its borders. Mr. 
Roosevelt set the precedent when he 
attended a dinner given by the presi- 
dent of Panama on Panama territory. 

Mr Taft left his guard behind the 
border line and his only military at- 
tendant was Capt. Butt, his aide. 

Governor Campbell of Texas, in 
crossing the line to call upon Presi- 
dent Diaz, also left his staff behind 
at the bridge. Invited guests accom- 
panying President Taft entered car- 
riages allotted them by the Mexican 
authorities and followed that in which 
Mr. Taft rode. , ^ * *i. 

The simple ceremonies ended at the 
Juarez customs house. Mr. Taft re- 
turned to head a civic and military 
parade five miles in length, concluding 
at Carnegie square, where the presi- 
dent reviewed the procession and later 
made a speech. ^ ■ ,,* ♦>,.. 

At the banquet in Juarez tonight the 
silver plate of Emperor Maxlmilllan Is 
to be used. Caterers from the City of 
Mexico will serve the dinner. 

nins PraiJuen UnHed State*. 
Just after President Diaz crossed the 
international border, he was asked by 
the correspondent of the Associated 
Press who accompanied him on his 
special train from the City of Mexico, 
to state his impressions of Americans 
and the United States. He said: 

"The high and well understood citi- 
zenship of this virile people, who have 
-ucceeded in interpretating the propo- 
sitions of government promulgated by 
the immortal Washington and his Illus- 
trious compatriots, has made practical 
in tlielr country the best of all govern- 
jnents— the government of the people, 
by the people. My impression is most 
pleasing." 




Registered. 
U. S. rat. o± 




on every package 

AKER's Cocoa 



The Leader for 129 Years 



HIGHEST AWARDS IN 
EUROPE AND AMERICA 



CLEARANCE SALE OF FINE FIXTURES! 

A special sale of fine electric and gas FIXTURES. DOWES, 
PORTABLES , etc. is now in progress, and the good seirsciions 
are going fast. There are a few goad pieces left, and we find 
that the low prices we have marked these fixtures to sell at 
is accomplishing ihe desired result. You can got immediate 
delivery on any piece you buy, and soma of the selections 
could very profitably be purchased now and stored and dis- 
tributed for Christmas gifts. Tha sale continues all week. 



NORTHERN ELECTRICAL CO. 



210 WCST 
FIRST ST. 



JOHN ALBERT JOSNSON M EMORIAL FIND 

?ohn .\Ibert Johnson Memorial I unci, Care of The Herald. Duluth: 

Eiulosod herewith please find (««* «» exceed $1). as a 

vintribution lo the fund to be used for the erection at the stale capitol 
S a inoiiumeut to John Albeit JohnM>n. late governor of Minnesota. 



n 
n 

n 
n 
n 

\ r 



(Signed) 




Louis county, outside of Duluth has 
made a good showing in swelling J he 
Herald's fund, and it now rests with 
the citizens of Dulutli to do equahy 

^ Tlie names of all contributors to the 
memorial fund are to be cart fully Pie- 
served by t!ie state commission and 
turntd over to Governor Eberhart who 
will deposit them in tiie state archives, 
where tliey will remain as lasting evi- 
dence of the popular movement to erect 
a memorial to Minnesota s greatest 
««vernor. 

I.iM off Con<ribnturM. 
Following is the list of contributions 
received by The Herald up to date: 

Previously acknowledged 5900.00 

K. L. Onlcan $1.00 |W. J. OUoU and 

Mrs. A. L. Ordcan . 1.00 ; family WOO 

M. Uriiid«rliig l.OOiJ.lm Jt. farlson . . . 100 

I P French 100 j.Mrs. John H. Carlson 1.00 

J G Harris 100 ' Whitney Wall 100 

A J. P.hlhom 1.00 jCliarlw <;. Irvine 100 

lilly E Moe 1.00 Ceerge lUcn. Ilan- 

Freila UndUra 100 cock. >Uch 100 

1.00 to. Nelson, Burnett, 

I JUnn 1-00 

.50 Gus Carlson, Burnett, 

Minn 1.00 

John Broom.. Burnett 
Minn 100 



Ani'.pew Jolinson 
Mlldrtd Alraei., 

Biwabik. Minn 
Harold Almtn. 

Biwabik, Minn 

C. Suudby 1-P' 

Gust J^hiuion lOo 



.50 



FIND STOLEN LITTLE ONES 

(Continued from page 1.) 



accompanied by an Italian, on the day 
of the kidnaping. ^^ , 

"I was on mv way from St. Louis 
to Chicago, on the Wabash railroad, 
when the Italian and the two children 
came aboard at St. Louis." said Ray- 
burn "The Italian acted queerly, but 
I thought little of it until later, when 
I heard of the kidnaping. The boy 
Tommaso started to cry, and at De- 
catur. 111. 1 got off the train and 
bought him a bag of popcorn. When 
the train reached the Polk street sta- 
tion at Cliicago the Italian incjulred 
the way to Jefferson and Superior 
streets." 

Can Tell Little. 
The children were recovered here 
yesterday while wandering, cold and 
hungry, about tlie streets. They spent 
a quiet night at the Passavant liospital. 
Today the girl, at first believed to be 
suffering from pneumonia brought on 
by exposure to the cold, was said to be 
suffering from nothing more serious 
than a severe cold. 

The children talked scarcely at all 
after awakening, but the warm food 
given them and the attentions of the 
solicitous nurses soon revived them. 

Little could be gained from them re- 
•^arding the kidnaping. The boy spoke 
of being in a wagon drawn by two 
horses and declared that the driver 
was a fine man who had given Grace a 
chain Subsequently they were taken 
aboard a train "and the whistle 
tooted." , , . - 

Tlie police believe that the kidnapers 
had the children secreted in a se- 
cluded section of the city and turned 
them loose when efforts to extort 
ransom had failed. 
■ 
\l>re Stolen AuB. 2. 
St Louis, Mo.. Oct. 16.— Grace and 
Tomasso Viviano, cousins, were kid- 
naped from tlielr home here Aug. 2. 
They were last seen with Samuel fur- 
l«si and since then he has been sought 
by the police. The girl is 3 years old 
and the boy is 5. ^,^„„ 

Four hours after the children dlsap- 
neared a special delivery letter signed 
"Mouth Shut" and written in Halhin, 
was received at the Viviano honie.^ T le 
letter demanded a ransom of 5-Ja,O0O. 
The father of each child Is named 
Pledro Vivianoo. They are manufact- 
urers and have been Black Hand vlc- 

"rwice the front of their store was 
blown out and once It was known 
thev paid $75 under threats. They 
alwavs refused to prosecute the sus- 
pected persons. «.j. 
Five Arrentii Made, 
Five persons were held by the police 
In the kidnaping but they were re- 
eased Three other suspects were 
never found. lamancia Guerolomo told 
of hauling three trunks to an express 
office for Turlssl. The trunks were 
located in Chicago. It was thought at 
first the children were- secreted In 
them. 

SHARP WORDS FLY AT T4FT 
DINNER AT^BUQUERQUE 

(Continued from page 1.) 



injunction plank would surely have 
been written into the platform." 

The president answered this sliarply. 
"Lest it go down witliout contradic- 
tion." he said, "1 want to say that 
lliere never was any chance of th& 
uassage of what Mr. Gompers re- 
quested in the Republican convention. 
The resolution 1 wanted passed on the 
subject of injunctions was defeated 
and a resolution milder in form wa» 
put in. That is history, and I don t 
want history to be recorded otlier than 
as we understand it to be." 
Itap nt AriKoua. 
One of the speakers paid his respects 
to the people of Arizona, a number of 
whom, including Governor Sloan or 
that territor>;. were present. Mr. I-au 
said the people of Arizona "were fool* 
not to come in under a joint statehood 
act when they had the chance." 

He also spoke of the right of New 
Mexico to statehood. 

"It is a right when it is accorded 
you," said the president, "and it 1» 
not a right until it is accorded to you. 

•We were entitled to statehood In 
1848 under a treaty," interrupted Mr. 
Fall. 

"Now. you would not argue that you 
were entitled to be a state in 184» 
and have two senators in Washington, 
wlien there were fifteen states between 
you and Washington that did not have 
statehood?' said the president. Let 
us be sensible. I am not contending 
against your coming in. I am only 
contending thaT you should come In 
sane. 

\m to ProiiifseM. 
"The gentleman across the table used 
the term 'possible,' as if he st 11 sus- 
pects mv sincerity and good will. Weil, 
of course, a man cannot do any more 
than promise and try and carry it out. 

"I do think that you may have had 
in times past reason to complain be- 
cause of promises made that were not 
fulfilled. I do not know. I am not 
sufficiently ver.sed in the history and 
therefore perhaps you liave a right to 
distrust me; but heretofore I have tried 
to tell the truth, tried to caiTy out 
such promises as I have made. You 
will bear me out tonight in the view 
that I have not softened exactly w'hat 
I Intended to Fay by reason of a fear 
that you might criticise me after- 
wards." 



•if the party had not agreed to admit 
us to the Union, the Gompers antl- 



Don't complain about cost of living. 
Barthe-Martin sell groceries at whole- 
sale. _ 

RLMOR SAYS KING IS DEAD 

(Contin ued from pag e L) 

seriously Injured three policemen and 

^ The'' report that some of the French- 
men had been executed in Barcelona la 

untrue. 

■ 

RiotM III Florence. • 

Florence. Oct. IC. — During a. Ver- 
ier demonstration a mob gathered 
about the palace of the archbishop 
crving insults. When driven back by 
the cavalry the rioters erected a barri- 
cade of wire netting across the street. 
Into this netting the horses galloped, 
manv of them being thrown w:th their 
riders Fourteen of the soldiers were 
wounded, four seriously, including the 
lieutenant commanding. A number or 
the horsts were killed. 

* ■ 

Bnrn Spaulsb Flae. 

Buenos Ayres, Oct. 16.— Five thou- 
sand workmen held a demonstration 
yesterday. during which violent 
speeches were made against the exe- 
cution of Ferrer, and a Spanish flag 

A bomb was exploded at the Span- 
ish consulate in Rosarlo. and the con- 
sulate building was somewhat dam- 
aged. _ 

Outbreak In Geneva. 

Geneva Oct. 16. — A Ferrer demon- 
stration last night <'"l"iipaj<'f. '"J'®; 
rious rioting, during which the mob 
ovti powered the police and wrecked 
the offices of the newspaper La Tri- 
bune. Many persons were injured. 
a 
Condemned By German Pre»«. 

BerUn Oct. 16- — The Democratic 
Union, an Independent Radical or- 
ganization founded by the late Theo- 
dore Barth has telegraphed its sym- 
pathy to Ferrer's daughter. The news- 
papers of all shades of opinion are dis- 
cussing the Ferrer case, most of them 
in a round of condemnation. The 
Agrarian organs .-ipplaud the execu- 
tion, saying that Ferrer got what he 
deserved. 



HIbhIne Munlcnl "^Preat. 

Hibbing. Minn., Oct. 16. -(Special to 
The Hcrald.'V— Next week the ladies of 
the Presbvterian church will oftVir, 
a rare musical treat to the people ot 
the city for they have secured the 
service.e of Teckla Farm. She will be 
heard In the new auditorium of the 
new city hall and from former im- 



MEMORIAL FUND GROWS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



i^ecured before Nov. 1. All contribu- 
tors should remember that Immediate 
actton is desired, as the time in which 
to complete tbe fund Is short. St. 




. 






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IHE DULUTH EVENING HEJRALD: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1909. 



BACKACHE MEANS 
DIRH KIDNEYS 

A Few Doses Clean and Reg' 

ulate the Kidneys and 

You Feel Better. 



No man or woman here whose kid- 
neys are out-ot-S^er. or who sutlers 
from backache or blillder misery, can 
afford to leave Pape's Diuretic un- 
tried. 

After taking several doses, all pains 
in the back, sides or loins, rheumatic 
twinge.-«, nervousnei^s. ht'adache. sleep- 
lessness, inflamed or swollen eyelids, 
dizziness, tired or worn-out feeling 
and other symptoms of clogged, slug- 
gish kidneys simply vanish. 

Uncontrollable urination (especial- 
ly at night). smarting. discolored 
water an»l all bladder misery ends. 

The moment you suspect the slight- 
est kidney or bladder disorder, or feel 
rheumatism pains, don't continue to 
be miserable or worried, but get a 
fifty-cent treatment *>f Pape's Diuretic 
from vour druggist and start taking as 
directed, with the knowledge that 
there is no other medicine, at any 
price made anywhere else in the 
world, which is -so harmless or will 
effect so thorough and prompt a cure. 

This unusual preparation goes di- 
rect to the cause of trouble, distribut- 
ing its cleansing, healing and vitaliz- 
ing influence directly upon the organs 
and glands affected and completes the 
cure before you realize it 

A few days" treatment of Pape s 
Diuretic means clean, healthy, active 
kidneys, bladder and urinary organs 
— and you feel flne. 

Your physician, pharmacist, banker 
Or any mercantile agency will tell you 
that Pape. Thompson & Pape of Cin- 
cinnati i.^ a large and responsible 
medicine concern, thoroughly worthy 
of your contldence 

Accept only Pape's Diuretic— flfty- 
cent treatment— from any drug store 
— anvwh'^re in the world. 



Why Suffer 

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show the beneficial effects of 

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properly nourishes the child. 
Nearly all mothers who 
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20 Fast Snp«rior Street. 



DR. e:. w. keck 

CMI^01*^=t ACTOR 

Suite S Metrapolltan block, Daiuih. Mi.in. 



Services at St. Paul'sl Episcopal 
church. Rev. A. W. Ryan, rector, Kev. 
R. .S. liead, assistant, will be as fol- 
lows; Holy communion, 8 a. m.; Sun- 
day school, 10 a. m.; morning prayer, 
litany and sermon on "The Unjust 
3t<^ward: the Business Sense In Re- 
lij?1on.'' Rev. W. N. Guthrie, 11 a. m. 
evening prayer and sermon on "The 
Elder Brother and tlie Prodigal Son," 
7:30 p. m., by the rector. Monday, Oct. 
18. St. Luke'.-« day. there will be holy 
communion at 10 a. m. 

Ftillowing is the musical program: 
MORNING. 
Proces.sional — 'Itise, Crowned With 

Light" 

Canticles 

Chanted. 
"Te Deum," in B flat ....J. R. Thomas 
Litany solo — Q Lord, Correct Me".. 

Handel 

Charles O. Applehagen. 
Hymn — "Love Divine, AH Love Ex- 
celling" 

Solo — "Let Not Your Heart Be 

Troubled" Chadwick 

Mary Syer Bradsliaw. 
Anthem — Like As the Hart" Custance 
Donald Alexander, Mary S. Bradsliaw, 

and Choir. 
Recessional — "Oft in Danger, Oft in 

Woe" 

EVENING. 
Processional — 'Rise, Crowned With 

Light" 

P.«<alter 

Chanted. 

Canticles 

Chanted. 
Hymn — "Forth in Thy Name, O Lord 

I Go- 

Anthem — "Abide With Me" 

Oliver King 

Orison duet — "Lo, 'Tis Night" 

Beethoven 

A. R. BJorkqulst. C. O. Applehagen. 

Recessional — "Oft in Danger" 

A. F. M. Custance, organist and 
choirmaster. 

• • • 

At tt-e First Meliiodist church, Third 
avenue west and Third street, the pas- 
tor. M. S. Rice, will preach both morn- 
ing and evening. At the morning serv- 
ice at 10:20 o'clcok, the theme of the 
sermon wtll be, "Falling Behind." At 
the evening service at 8' o'clock the 
theme of the sermon will he. "A Poor 
VVi.sh." Sunday soliool will meet at 
12:15 noon. Watson S. .Moore, superin- 
tendent. Epwortis league will meet at 
6:45 p m. 

• • • 

Centennial services wIU be held at 
t!ie Fir.st Cliristian church. West 
Fourtlj street and Me-'aba avenue. P. 
N. Xystrom of Minneapolis will speak 
at 10:'iO a. m. iind 7:t.'> p. ni. Sunday 
school will meet at noon; Christian En- 
deavor at 6:30 p. m. 

« • • 

At the First Ba:>tist cliurcii. Ninth 
avenue east and First street, the pastor. 
Dr. J. S. Kirtley. will preach at 1Q:30 a. 
ai. on "Seed Time and Harvest." At :3t> 
p. ni. a musical service will be given. 
In whicli liic ciioir will l)e assisted by 
Miss Olive Capron. violin, and Alpliin 
Flaaten, 'cello. Sunday school will meet 
it noon; Brutlier.'iood class for men. 
Voung People's meeting will be given 
at G:.30 p. m. 

Tlie musical program: 
MORNING. 

Organ prelude — "Andante" Tours 

Antliem — "Tiie Xtng of I.,ove". .Slielley 
Ke.sponse — "Father, Hear. Our Humble 

Prayer" , Haiiscom 

Oft>rtory solo — "The Publican" 

Van der Water 

Misjj Wrigiit. 

Postlude — "Lemmens" 

EVENING. 
Organ prelude — **Oommun.ion in G" . . 

Batiste 

Anthem — "The Lord is My Rock". . . . 

Rogers 

Duet — "My Faith Looks Up to Thee" 

Schnecker 

Me3j.-rs. Irvine and Wilson. 
Response — 'Glory to Tiiee. My God" 

Hanscom 

Miss Wright. 
Offf-rtory — "Andante" Oscar Fuchs 

-Miss Olive Capron. violin; Alphin 

Flaaten. 'cello. 

Solo — "Evening and Morning" . .Spicher 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin. 
Anthem — "i Come, O Blessed Savior" 

Pinsuti 

• « • 

At the Y. W. C. A. vesper service 
Sunday at 4 p. m.. Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Gaughev of the Y. M. C. A. will be tlie 
speaker. The soloist will be Miss Jean 
Wanles.s. 

• * * 

Ai the Seventh Day Adventist 
church. Tenth avenue east and Sixth 
street, the pastor. A. V. Olson, will 
speak tomorrow night at 8 o'clock. 
The theme of his sermon will be "Bap- 
tism." Tlie following Saturday, there 
will be Sabbath school at 10:30 and 
morning service at 11::{0 in charge «»f 
t!ie mission secretary. Miss May Jen- 
sen. 

• « * 

Rev. John Walker Powell will preach 
at the Endion Methodist Rpiscopal 
churcii at 11 a. m., on 'The Wisdom of 
Foolishness." Bible school will nieet 
at 10 o'clock. 

m * * 

At Hope Church of the P^vangelical 
association. Sixth avenue ea.st and 
Fifth street. S. B. Goeiz. pastor: Rev. 
J. J. Normamaker of Mount Cory. Ohio, 
will preach boili morning and evening. 
After the morning sermon there will 
be communion services. All tlie serv- 
ices .Sunday will be conducted in the 
En.glish language. The Sunday school 
win meet nt 10 o'clock in the morn- 
ing and will be in cliarge of C. L. Ra- 
kowsky. superintendent. 

• • • 

At the Grace Methodist Episcopal 
church. Twenty-second avenue west 
ar.d Third street. Rev. M. O. Stockland. 
pastor, the regular services will be 
Iseld morning .and evening. The sub- 
ject for the sermon at 10;:50 a. m. will 



be "The Three Records," and In the 
evening at 7:30, the subject will be 
"Christ the Preacher." The Sunday 
f^jiool. R. R. Forward, superintendent, 
win meet at 11:45 a. m., and the Ep- 
worth league at 6:45 p. m. 

♦ • • 

At the Second Presbyterian church, 
James L. McBride, pastor, services will 
begin at 10:45 and 7:45. The subject 
of the morning sermon will be "The 
Kingdomii of Earth." The evening ser- 
mon will be illustrated with the stere- 
opticon. Sabbath school will meet at 
12 and the Christian Endeavor society 
at 7. 

« * * 

At the First Unitarian church. First 
street and Eighth avenue east. Rev. 
George R. Gebauer. minister, Sunday 
school will meet at 9:45: church serv- 
ice at 11 o'clock. The subject of the 
sermon will be "The Pursuit of Hap- 
piness." 

• • * 

At the Central Baptist churcli. 
Twentieth avenue west and First 
street. Rev. .1. Bergstrom will preach 
at 10:30 on tlie subject. "The Positive 
Way of Living." Bitjle school will 
meet at noon; junior society will meet 
at 3 p. m.; B. Y. P. U. at 6:30. At 7:30 
the choir will give a musical program: 

* • « 

At the Lest er Park Metliodist 
church. Fifty-fourth avenue east and 
Superior street, the pastor, Rev. 
Charles R. Oaten, will preach and con- 
duct the services tomorrow. The sub- 
ject oi the morning sermon will be 
"Testing Our Discipleship," and for the 
evening. "How MucJi Are You Worth?" 
The ciiolr will assist with good music. 
Bernard Hanford will sing at the 
morning service. Sunday school will 
meet at noon and Epworth league at 
6:30 in the evening. 

« * • 

Campbell Coyle will preach tomor- 
row niglit in the First Presbyterian 
church at 7:45 on "The Approaching 
Crisis of the World Reasoned From a 
Bible Basis." postponed from last Sun- 
day night on account of tlie storm. 



At the morning service at 10:30 the 
subject will be, "The Hcly Spirit and 
the Believer," Sunday school and 
brotherhood will meet at noon. Dr. R. 
W. Bowden, superintendent. Christian 
Endeavor meeting will be at 6:45. Fol- 
lowing is the musical program: 

MORNING. 
Organ prelude— "Kaiser Quartett".. 

Haydn 

Anthem — "Rejoice, All Ye Nations".. 

West 

Offertory — "Andante" Dunham 

Bass solo — "The Penitent" 

Van de Water 

Mr. Brown. 

Postlude Guilmant 

EVENING. 

Organ prelude Harison Wild 

Anthem — 'Tarry Witli Me, O My 

Saviour" Baldwin 

Offertory Spinney 

Postlude — "Marche de Piocesslon". . 

Vanderpoel 

The ciioir will consist of Miss Gladys 
Revnolds. Mrs. Blanche G. Schell, Phil- 
lip Gordon Brown. Joseph Lonegren 
and Miss Isabel Pearson, organist. 

* * • 

At the First Unitarian church. First 
street and Eighth avenue east. Rev. 
George R. Gebauer. minister. Sunday 
school will meet at 9:45; church service 
at 11 o'clock. The subject will be, 
"The Pursuit of Happiness." 

• « * 

At the Second Churcli of Christ. 
Scientist. Burgess hall. 310 and 312 
Wesc First street, services wiM be held 
at 10:45 a. m., the .subject being "Doc- 
trine of Atonement." The regular 
Wednesday evening testimonial meet- 
ings are held at 8 p. m. 

* * * 

At Lakeside Presbyterian church 
Rev. J. A. McGaughey M'ill preach at 
10:30 a. m. Sunday school will meet 
at 12 o'clock; Christian Endeavor so- 
ciety ac 6 o'clock. There will be no 
evening preaching service. 

• « * 

At St. John's Episcopal church, Lake- 
side, there will be holy communion at 
8 a. m.; Blble> school at 10; morning 



the Gordon Bennett trophy has 
definitely awarded the trophy to 
Edgar W. Mix, the American competi- 
tor, who landed in Russian Poland. 



MAY UNITE ALL THE 

INDEPENDENT PHONES. 



JOHNSON HOPE OF CLEVELAND 



LETTER OF EX-PRESIDENT REVEALS ENTHUSIASM FOR MIN- 

NESOTAN'S POSSIBLE NOMINATION— HIS FAITH WAS 

STILL IN THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 



L 



Utica, N. Y., Oct. 16. — E. Prentis.s 

Bailey, the veteran editor of the Utica 
Observer and close friend of Grover 
Cleveland, prints in his newspaper the 
text of a letter he received from tlie 
former pre.sident a few days before 
Mr. Cleveland went to Princeton, N. J., 
where he later died, and wliich Edi- 
tor Bailey believes is the last letter of 
any length or Importance tliat Cleve- 
land wrote. 

The ex-president's letter to Mr. Bai- 
ley is dated at Princeton, N. J.. March 
14. 1908 and lt.s contents are particu- 
larly interesting in the light of the 
controversy precipitated a year ago by 
the so-called Cleveland letter produced 
by Broughton Brandenburg, which has 
subsequently alleged to have been 
a forgery and for selling which 
Brandenburg was prosecuted in New 
Y'ork. 

Tlie letter wiiich Brandenburg gave 
to the public made it appear early in 
tlie last presidential year that Mr. 
Cleveland, becoming hopeless of his 
party, turned eulogist of Taft, the 
then expected nominee of the Repub- 
licans. Brandenburg testified at his 
trial early this year that the letter was 
.'signed bv t!ie president and given to 
him abo'.'t Marcii 8. 1908. 

Fur .lohn.sun nnd 'Sot Taft. 

The letter which wa.s written to the 
editor of the Observer six days later 
than that date shows that the ex- 



president \vas still with liis party, and, 
instead of having Taft In mind, was 
contemplating with satisfaction the 
possible nomination of the late John 
A. Johnson of ^finnesota for the presi- 
dent bv tli^ Democrats. 

The letter in part follows: 

"I cannot rid myself of the idea that 
our party, which has withstood so 
many clashes with our political op- 
ponents, is not doomed, at his- time, to 
sink to a condition of useless and last- 
ing decadence. 

"In my last letter to you I expressed 
myself as seeing some light ahead for 
Democracy. 1 cannot help feeling at 
this time that the liglit is still bright- 
er. It does seem to me that movements 
have set in motion, whic h. though not 
at the present time of large dimen^ 
sions, promi.se final relief from tUe 
burden which has so lorg weighed us 
down. 

Be«t Hope lu .lolbiuton. 

"I have lately come to the conclusion 
tliat our best Impe rests ipon the nom- 
ination of Johnson of M nnesota. The 
prospects to my nvind appear as bright 
with him as our leader as with any 
other, and Whetlit^I" we meet with suc- 
cess or not. I believe with such a leader 
we sliall take a long step in the way of 
returning to our old creed and the ()ld 
policies and the old plans of organi/.a- 
tion which have hereto: ore led us to 
victory." 



prayer and sermon at 11 by Rev. Afb^rt* 
R. Parker, the subject being "Tree ot 
Life;" evening prayer and sermon at 
5 o'clock by William Norman Guthrie, 
who has been delivering a course of 
lectures in this city. 

* « • 

At Trinity Norwegian Lutheran 
church, Fourth avenue east and Fifth 
street. Rev. P. Nllsen will conduct the 
services in the morning at 10:30 and in 
the evening at 8 o'clock. Sunday school 
will meet at noon. 

* * « 

At Bethesda Norwegian Lutheran 
church. Sixth avenue east and Fifth 
street, tliere will be no services Sun- 
day forenoon, as the pastor. Rev. Theo- 
dore J. Austad, will conduct services 
at Nea, Minn. Services will be held in 
the evening at 7:45 in the Norwegian 
language. Norwegian Sunday school 
will meet at 9 a. m.; English Sunday 
school at noon. Luther Young Peo- 
ple's society will have a social and 
business meeting Monday evening, Oct. 
25. at 8 o'clock. The ladies' aid society 
will give an autumn supper in the 
church Wednesday and Thursday even- 
ings, Oct. 20 and 21. 

* • * 

At. St. Mark's A. M. E. church. Fifth 
avenue east and Sixth street, the first 
quarterly meeting services will be held. 
Rev. E. G. Jackson, presiding elder of 
the St. Paul district, will be present. 
The morning services will be held at 11 
o'clock and love feast services will 
follow. At the evening services at 8 
o'clock there will be preaching, and 
the Lord's supper will follow. The 
presiding elder will preach at boih 
services, assisted by the pastor, Jona- 
than Brewer. Sunday school will meet 
at 12:15 p. m., Mrs. Charles Colby, su- 
perintendent. The choir will furnish 
special music at the services. Miss 
Helen Scott, the organist, will be as- 
sisted bv Richard D. Gordon, trombone 
soloist: Harvev L, Plttman, dliector. 
Mondav. at 8 p. m., the official boards 
of the" church will meet. Wednesday, 
at 8 p. m.. the first quarterly confer- 
ence will be held. The Rev. E. G. Jack- 
son, the presiding elder, will preside. 



seventy boys enrolled. This year it is 
expected there will be over 100. It 
has been planned to have the upper 
classmen meet on Mondays and the 
Freshmen will meet on Tuesday. They 
will meet for organization "Tuesday, 
Oct. 26. The goal of the Bible study 
committee this year is to enroll 175 
boys and it is possible they will pass 
the mark. The courses that will be 
used have bee*i especially prepared 
for boys' classes. First year students 
will study the life of Christ; second 
year, travels of Paul: third year, men 
of the Bible; fourth year advanced 
life ot Christ; fifth year life and 
epistles of Paul. In the spring an ex- 
amination is held and every boy 
passing is awarded a diploma from the 
international committee of New York. 
Last season fifty boys secured di- 
plomas. The Bible study committee 
will give a shield with the names en- 
graved on it to, to the class having 
the best attendance and securing the 
most diplomas. The Bible study clubs 
are open to any boy of the city. 

* * • 

The Sunday club for older boys will 
meet at the boys' department Sunday 
afternoon at 4:30. Dr. J. S. Kritley 
will give the talk. There will be a 
program, and lunclieon will be served 
at 6 o'clock. All boys of the city are 
invited. 

* * • 

The Pirates, the club for boys over 
12 years and under 15 will meet at 3 
o'clock. W. E. Lauterbaugh will give 
the talk. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Oct. 16. — The Ohio 
Home Telephone company was incorpo- 



rated at Columbus y«»Bferday for' the 
purpose of leasing the .property of the 
United States Telephone company and 
the Ohio Independent Telephone com- 
pany. The new company is capitalized 
at 1500,000. It is expected that the mova 
mill result in a nation-wide company 
to operate the Independent lines. 

Don't complain about cost of living. 
Barthe-Martin sell groceries at whole- 
sale. 




POLISH 



K 




^ 



Corner Fourth Avenue East and Fourth Street. 

The last and best of its kind in the city. We 
have hundreds of dollars' wortii of Fancy W^ork 
to suit the best taste of the most critical visitors. 
Finest lot of Tame Game Birds, such as home- 
raised Mallards, spring milk-fed Partridges, and 
the "North Pole" Geese — just shipped in by the 
explorers, and many other varieties galore. 

DON'T GO DUCK HUNTING 

And get "ducked" for your money, but come and 
spend a night with us, and you will go home with 
some game. 

A Good Time for Everybody. Come One? 
Come All ! The bazaar will continue until the 24th 
of October. 



I 

r 

r 



"•^ 



«Hi^?^¥«*«*«***^.^**«'ie**«*#****^^^ 



Don't complain about cost of living. 
Barthe-Martin sell groceries at whole- 
sale. 



DYNAMITE ROLLS 
OFF BOSTON TRAIN 



CUT FLOWERS 
and PLANTS 

Buy a nice Fern or Palm 
for your house now, 

Also Roses, Carnations, 
Violets, Lilies, Etc. in i:ut 
flowers. 
Funeral Designs Made Upon Short Notice. 

J. J. LrCBORIOVS 







^ 




^> '^^§^%!jHh 


^JSSKm tJxSmj j"Hj)fflP^ * 






BB^'"" 


^M 




W ^ 






^S::;,:::-::,x:::::;,;;;::g,::x::;:;::g>x 



92 1 East Third Street. 



Both Phones. 




IHl S^IHIiiL iiT 




l!¥^MP*!¥**^^***********'!¥*iW^^ 



TBE SUMMER IN NEW YORK A 
MOST AHRACTIVE SEASON 



Its Fine Hotels. I.lke the .St. Recrls, 
Not as Full Then a.s in Winter. 



THE NICEST SELECIIOIV OF 

WATCHES and FINE JEWELRY 

AND SILVERWARE 

J. GRUESEN'S 

2» W. First St. ilter N«v. t. DULUTB. MINI*. 



CATARRH 



BLADDER 





PARKER^ 
HAIR BALSAM 

FramotM • lazarUnt fronrth. 
M«T«r TaUs to Be«tor« On^ 

K»ir to ita ToatUUl Colo>w 

Ouni K&lp d'tMM* h bklr htllf 

aoc.«iidti.a)«t DronUtt 



The summer i.s the season when the 
city man and his family fly to the 
country, the seashore or the moun- 
tains. It ought to be a good time for 
the country man and his family to 
come to the city — and it Is. The 
country has no monopoly of summer 
pleasures. New York iias plenty of 
them, and at that tim^ its hotels are 
less thronged tha^ in winter. As the 
attractions of Nexc' YoYk City exceed 
those of smaller' piaces.so do its hotel 
comforts surpa^' theirs. One New^ 
York hotel there is, the St. Regis, at 
Fifth Avenue and Fifty-fifth Street, 
which has won for itself a deserved 
reputation for real comfort and home- 
likeness far beyond any other. Its lo- 
cation, in practically the geographical 
center of Manhattan, makes it most 
convenient for trips to all parts of 
the city. Being situated in a strictly 
residential district, it is admirably 
adapted for a summer sojourn, and. 
being within a few minutes of Central 
Park, it has the country at its doors, 
so to speak. And it should not be 
forgotten that the St. Regis prices 
are not e.xcessive. Its restaurant 
charge.s are tht? same as other first 
cla.ss hotels, and rooms may t>e had as 
low as $3 and $4 a day for a large, 
handsomely furnished single bedroom; 
the same with private bath for %'i a 
day (or $6 for two people); or $12 a 
day iind up for an elegant suite con- 
sisting of parlor, bedroom and private 
bath. 



The success of '"Mack"' (Elis) Cook 
in the freshman-sophomore games at 
Dartmouth cau-'^ed much joy among 
the high school pupils. "Mack" is an 
alumnus of the Duluth high school 
and has inany friends who wish him 
success. After the freshmen won the 
series a banquet was given in their 
honor and "Mack" was called upon 
to respond to a toast. He proved 
himself to be not only an athlete, but 
aI.so a speaker of ability when the 

occasion demands. 

« • • 

A special meeting of the .sophomore 
class was held Friday afternoon to de- 
cide upon the cla.ss dues to be charged 
and to begin preparations for the an- 
nual sophomore - Freshman football 
game. Lawrence Duby, president of 
the class made a fev.- remarks and 
then called upon "Dutch" Jeronimous, 

captain of the team, for a speech. The 
captain urged the boys to turn out 
for the first practice Saturday morn- 
ing and said the sophomores would 
win if he were given the material to 
pick from. 

« • • 
The senior girls are also getting 
the gymnasium fever. Tuesday after- 
noon they held a meeting to fornn 
a gymnasium class, and a large num- 
ber attended the meeting. The girls 
are now looking forward to the time 
when their basket ball team \ffil be 
formed so they can show the fresh- 



man and sophomore girls what real 

football is like. 

« « • 

Monday .morning the pupils of the 
high school ^vi^ show that the rever- 
ence for the memory of Governor 
Johnson is not lacking in the school. 
They have decided to take up a collec- 
tion for the Governor Johnson me- 
morial fund ^and think the other 
schools throughout the state will fol- 
low their example. 

* * * 

The pupils of Mi.ss Wells' advanced 
algebra classes attended two lectures 
la.st Tuesday on "Oxford." Miss Wells 
was so pleased with the lecture of 
Mr. Porter in the morning that she 
became very enthusiastic on the sub- 
ject, and her algebra classes heard 
her views of it. Many expressed the 
opinion that Miss WelLs' lecture was 
as interesting as Mr. Porter's. 

* * * 

The first freshman class meeting, 
which was to be held last Wednesday, 
.was postponed and will in all prop- 
ability be held next Wedneday. 

• • * 

Many of the high school boys at- 
tended the banquet given by the boys' 
Y. M. C. A. in honor of Mr. Porter, 
who delivered such an excellent ad- 
dress on '"Oxford and the Rhodes 
Scholarship" last Tuesday morning. 
Mr. Porter made a hit with the boys 
in the morning and they were anixous 
to meet him, and they had the oppor- 
tunity by attending the banquet Tues- 
day evening. 

• * * 

The first marks of the year come out 
Monday. 



Heavy Charge of Explosives 
Shipped in Box in Bag- 
gage Car. 

Boston, Muss., Oct. 16. — Consterna- 
tion was caused among the employes 
at the North station yesterday, when 
a stick of dynamite fell out of a bo.v 

as it was being removed from tlie bag- 
gage car of tlie St. Jolin express train. 
An examination disclosed nineteen 
other sticks of dynamite, fifty pounds 
of black powder, several cartridges 
and a bo.K of m.atciies. 

L.ast niglit a man wiio gave his name 
as Michaele Zenia presented a check 
for tiie box and v.-as arrested on a 
charge of transporting explosives with- 
out permission. Zenia told the police 
that he was on his way from Bristol, 
N. B.. to Italy. He refused to say 
what he intended to do witli the ex- 
plosives. 

The train upon which the box was 
shipped is one of the lieaviest carriers, 
carrying regularly between JUO and 
600 passengeiH. 

AMERICAN FLYER IS 

AWARDED THE TROPHY. 



Zurich. Switzerland, Oct. 16. — It is 
announced that the committee having 
in charge the recent balloon race for 



NOTABLE GAINS SHOWN IN TRADE 



New York. Oct. 16. — R. G. Dun & 
Go's. Weekly Review of Trade today 
says: 

Renewed buying of rolling stock by 
tl:<» railrca;'s is the considcuous devel- 
opment fea'.ure of th.. vv-cok in the iron 
and steel trad.?. Rep' rts Indicate that 
orders are being placed with some 
urgency and that considerable new 
business is under negotiation. Activ- 
ity at steel works is reflected in con- 
tinued heavy purchases of pig iron at 
many points, and furtlier advances in 
prices are annnounced. One contract 
for 20,000 tons of Bessemer at J19 is 
reported. The structural shops are re- 
ce;yri!< a moderate amount of new 
bu.sTness. 

Trade in drygoods shows steady 
gain and the iiigher prices in the 
primary markets, forced by the sus- 
tained higli coats of raw materials are 
now quite freely paid. Curtailment of 
production in cotton mills amounting 
to 224 working hours at convenient 
dates between now and August, has 
beep virtually agreed upon. Sales of 
print cloths at Fall River last week 
almost equalled production, 60,000 
pieces spot and I.tO.OOO -future. Trad- 
ing in wide cloths continues active 
and prices are fully on a level witii 
tilt cotton market. Kxoort trade Is 
limited by the higher prices. Foreign 
slupmenta from New York this week 



are 132.563 bales, against 144.876 a 
year ago. Dress good.'; are moving 
better for immediate use and woolens 
in men's wear liave been purchased 
liberally. Advances in foreign and 
domestic lines of woolen and worsteds 
are being announced. Hosiery and 
underwear are higher and more active. 
Tlie footwear market is steadily 
improving, but the prict question con- 
tinues to retard business and some 
branches of tlie trade continue quiet. 
Staple lines of heavy goods by men's 
wear receive chief attention at pres- 
ent, but tliefe \a a better demand this 
week for meh's ined um and fine 
grades. Pronounced strength con- 
titnues to rule in all kinds of hides 
and further advances are being se- 
cured in botli foreign and domestic 
stock. Tlie leather trade continues 
slowly to. improve but; there is no 
great actik-lty as yet although prices 
have stiffened about 1 per cent per 
hundred op harness leather and most 
varieties of sole. 



Y. M. G. A. ACTIVITIES 




The boys' department Bible study 
clubs will open next week and the 
first class to organize will be the high 
school class,' It will meet Monday 
•venlng for dinner at 6:15. Last year 



Stops Catarrh 
At Once. 



K^ev*- Metbod a Marvel In Quick E!f- 
fectti on Catarrh, >'OHe and Tbroat 
TroubleM. 





S * 






PING PONG PHOTOGRAPHS 

Those cute little ones that yon have been looking for— 2,;c dozen. 
30 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. Upstairs. 



A new treatment for catarrh, differ- 
ent from anytliing ever before offered 
to catarrh sufferers, remarkable for its 
simplicity, Its promptness in results 
and immediate satisfaction it gives 
to the user, comes as a blessing to 
victims of this disease, especially at 
this time. 

No bulb instruments, no ointments, 
no jellies, salves or tonics are used. 
The new treatment is used in half a 
minute. All gagging, spitting, hawk- 
ing, nose stoppages, throat droppings, 
bad breatli, hay fever, sneezing, bron- 
chitis, asthma, should di.=:appear almost 
before the sufferer is aware of it, if 
the simple directions are followed. 

The rrsulfs proralsrtl «re not exaggerated a particle. 
Ni matter liow aclvanoed. serious or chronic your 
case may be. no uiatter liow many tilings you liaTe 
tried to curs it. we urge every one of our readers to 
ieiul tbclr name and address to tlie Lu\ur Company, 
and leuni In a few day*' time how to stop the most 
serious. olHtinate and advanced rase of catarrh 
Ininginable. 

Tlie treatment l» po'^ltlvcly reliable and it has been 
pretHcted that it will revolutionize the treatment of 
catarrh. 

Send your name and address today en Uie coupon 
t)€low. together with 2 cents in staim>s for postage, 
lo the Luxor (.'... 112 Qulnlan Bldg.. Cldcag.i. 111., 
for full lllustnted information, free. 



Free Catarrh Coupon. 

LUXOR CO.. 

112 Qninlan Klilg.. Chicago. HI. 

Centlemen: — I enclose 2c. stamp for wtilch send 
me by rotuni uuill. full lUustralwl information 
about your wondtrful remedy for catarrh, n:;*e 
and throat tDubles. 



Name . . 
.\ddres.s 



A low price can t f 

bring enough quality. 

Cheapened clothes are not 

cheap. The label in the corner 

is put in our garments to encourage 
confidence; it means that you can't take 
a risk at any shop where you find it. 
We take the shrink out of Sincerity 
cloths before we put them into 

^mcetittj Clotke,$ 

That's why their shape is permanent — it 
wouldnU be if there was t\\c: least chance of the 
fabric stretching after you wear the garments. 

The shape with ^saS^SM'i 

which you start a 
Sincerity Suit or 
Overcoat stays 
there until you 
stop wearing it. 
It's tailored into 
the fabric. Sin- 
cerity Clothes for 

young men are cut on special models. Such 
good figures are built into the garments that 
you needn't worry about your own. 

A book about young men's fashions 
free for the asking. Why not askf 

Ktth* tlathatt 6 Hither Co* 



MAOE AND 
GUARANTXEO 

BT 

KUH.MATHAW 

li f^lSCMLM CO. 



!•-"*■ 



' ■■■ * ■! ^ 



•^a 



MAKERS 



CHICAGO 




>«.i 



immm 



% 






_i^«ihaA«i^ 



^ iX^nrrtja^ 



'\. 



'MilgT- 



ptssssi 



I 



►— ^ 



rHE DULUTH EVfiNING HERALD: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16. 1909. 



Bloated and 
Sour Stomach 



Need Xo Longer Be Endured By Suf- 
ferers From Dyspepsia. 

The stomach and intestines always 
contain, even in health, a small 
amount of gases. They seem, both 
from a chemical and mechanical point 
of view, to be essential, to some ex- 
tent at least, to good digestion. A 
great deal of common air is swal- 
lowed with the food, and the remark- 
able facility with which air bubbles 
are formed in the saliva is refcrrable 
to this .special purpose. 

It follows that oxygen and nitrogen 
are natural to the stomach, and it has 
been ascertained that nitrogen is 
greatly in excess of oxygen, showing 
that even in the stomach this gas is 
some way employed in the vital pro- 
ces.ses. But as gases are easily evolved 
by fermentation and decomposition of 
food in the stomach and intestines, 
and as saccharine and other ferment- 
able matters dissolved in liquids are 
present in the ga.stro-intestinal tube, 
it results that its aeroform contents 
are much more complex than is gen- 
erally supposed. 

When digestion is perfectly healthy 
there can be no fermentation and Ilat- 
ulence. but as soon as indigestion oc- 
curs carbonic acid gas and various 
other gases are freely formed in the 
stomach and bfwels, causmg much 
discomfort. 

The remedies employed for the cure 
of flatulence may be classified as fol- 
low.«i: Those which prevent fermenta- 
tion; those which favor the expulsion 
of '^a.i, and those which oxidize and 
absorb gases. Of the remedies which 
possess the above properties, char- 
coal is the only one which has the 
power of preventing fermentation and 
decompjJ-^ition of food, and at the same 
time absorbing all excess gases in the 
alimentary channel. 

Medicines which expel ga.ses from 
the stomach, known as carmmatives. 
are not to be compared with a remedy 
which absorbs the gases ''^"'l Pft^^rS-^c 
eructations or belching . bTUAUi b 
CHARCOAL LOZENGES are now used 
by thousands of people who were for- 
merly subject to fermentation, decom- 
position, belching, bad breath and 
rumbling noises in the inte.stinal sys- 
tem and from which disagreeable 
s>mptoms through the use of these 
powerful absorbent lozenges, complete 
relief has been obtained. 

They are made of the finest willow 
wood treated by a special, exclusive, 
carbonizing process, and when sweet- 
ened with pure honey, a medicinal 
product is obtained which is at once 
pala'-vble and wonderfully effective in 
curing these complaints. Purchase a 
box from your druggist J^t ojice for 
50 cents and give them a fair trial 
the result will more than please you. 
Send u- vour name and address am^ 
a free sample will be forwarded to 
vou by return mail. Address F A. 
Stuart Co., 200 Stuart Bldg., Marshall. 
Mich. 




E. S. Koyce in behalf of the creditors. 
Marquette — Sheriff Hurley and Pros- 
ecuting Attorney Brown of Grand 
Rapids, Kent county, were in the city 
Thursday, having brought Bartolomeo 
Sartori to the branch prison, where h© 
will spend the rest of his days. Sartori 
was convicted of first degree murder 
in Grand Ranids last week. 



NOTED BOOM 
CASEENDED 

Defendant Gets Verdict in Ac- 
tion Involving Booming 
Many Logs. 

District Court of Bemidji Dis- 
poses of One Rather 
Famous Case. 



THREE MINNESOTA MEN CAPTURE 
CLASS HONORS AT NORTH DAKOTA U. 



TWENTY YEARS A SPECIALIST 

TREAT1%G SPECIAL 
DISEASES ONLY, 



Dr 




DISEASES OF MEN 
DISEASES OF WOMEN 
CHRONIC DISEASES 
NERVOUS DISEASES 

At Dnlath, St. LouH Hotel, Satnrday, 
Oct. 23, Iroiii 9 «. m. until 8 p. ni. 



BcmidjI, Mfnn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — After being out for sev- 
eral hours, the jury in the famous 
boomage case of the International 
Boom company and the Namokin Lum- 
ber company vs. the Rainy River Boom 
corporation, brought in a verdict in 

favor of the defendant In the sum of 
$<;,S54, "value of defendants' interest 
in s-aid property (replevined logs), in 
case return cannot be liad." 

The second of the boom cases, that 
of the Namokin Lumber company, 
tlie Rainy Lake River Boom company, 
was continued, to be taken up in 
.Minneapolis Tuesday, Oct. 26. by .Judge 
Wright. An amendment was allowed 
to the defendant's answer, making it 
necessary to try the two remaining 
boom cases separately — being tliose of 
the Namokin Lumber company vs. the 
Rainy Lake River Boom company and 
tlie Shevlln-Mathieu Lumber company 
vs. the Rainy l^ke River Boom com- 
pany. Tlie cases are ail very important 
ones and involve about J80,000. 

The jury was allowed to go until 
next Monday morning, Judge Wright 
adjourning couit to that time. It is 
expected that Judge Stanton will pre- 
side Monday, if any trial can be set for 
tlieii, as Judge Wright goes to his 
home at Park Rapids to remain until 
Tuesday morning. 

NEW FINANCE 
PUN ADOPTED 




late Monday night and is presumed 
to have died from heart failure, while 
walking home. He leaves a wife and 
live children. 

Fond Du Lac — One of the biggest 
business deals which has occurred here 
In years was concluded Thursday 
night, when a number of Eastern and 
Wisconsin brewers purchased what is 
known as the Reinig malt house, 
which was once the center of a big In- 
dustry here, but which has been Idle 
since"the death of John Reinig. 

Richland Center — Lloyd Sandmire, 
the 14-year-old son of Mr. and Mr.«. 
Lee Sandmire of Ash Ridge, was the 
victim of the accidental discharge of 
a gun which resulted In his death. The 
Kun, a 22-special, was in the hands of 
John Walworth of this city. The 
Sandmire boy had gone into the woods 
with a partv from this city. 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



C. O. LLh., 
Ada, Minn. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Oct. 16. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Three Minne- 
sota men are making remarkably good 
records at the North Dakota uni- 
versity, where they are enrolled as 
students in their senior year. These 
three are C. O. Lee and J. C. Thorpe 



dumped from one of the regulation 
steel cars in use on t)ie L S. & I. in four 
and one-half minutes, with the assist- 
ance of four men. Hematite is con- 
sidered about an average ore as far as 
easiness and difficulty in dumping is 
concerned. 



SHOTGUN PROVES * 

A FATAL GOAD. * 




EMINENTLY SUCCESSFUL IN 

£mr. Nose and Throat Diseases, such as deaf- 
ness partial deafness, roaring ringing noises m tht 
h^^any cases that have been improperly 
treated can be restored. 

Eye Diseases, cataract, granulated lids, week 
and watery eyes, inflamed eyes and the fitting ol 
glas-^es carefully considered and treated with th« 
latest and most modern methods. „^f„„v 

Catarrhal Diseases, broncial catarrh, catarrh 
of the lungs, nasal catarrh, forced breathing and 
obstructed breathing in the nostrils can be in most 
cases completely cured. . 

Diseases of the Luoas. early consumptioru 
pleuri..y. asthma, shortness of the breath treated 
with the latest tubercular treatment. 

Liver, Stomach and Bowl frouft/es. dyspepsia. 
Bick headache, appendicitis, gall stones, constipa- 
? on d^«^s of the liver and the many disease! 
Sndenton a weak and Inactive d'Pestive system 

K/d»ey and Bladder Troufc/e, diabetes, bright ^ 
disease stone in the kidneys, enlargement of tht 
kS^l pains in the Uck. Bdffncss of the back. 



Nervous Diseases, Neuralfla. sciat^ ner- 

drop 
Fv'sw'eTling'of the limbs, open sores, pain .n tht 



vous prostration, nervous debility, nervons 
irestion Daralysia and brain diseases. 

Blood and Skin Diseases, heart diseases, drop- 



Meet of Board of Commis- 
sioners for Foreign Mis- 
sions Ends. 

Minneapolis, Oct. 16. — The closing 
session of the centennial convention of 
the American board of commissioners 
for foreign nations, was held last even- 
ing. In several respects it has been 
one of the most remarkable conven- 
tions ever held by the organization. It 
has marked the beginning of a new fi- 
nancial plan by which it is iioped to 
place the board and its mission work 
beyond the need of funds. 

The opening devotional service yes- 
terday was led bv Rev. L. O. Baird of 
Omaha, following which he delivered 
an address. . ,. , 

•Some Things We Have Left Undone,* 
was tlie theme of Rev. Enoch F. Bell, 
as.^istant secretary. Rev. Edward L. 
Smith of .Seattle, urged the more ac- 
tive participation of corporate mem- 
bers in the work of the board. 

••Plans for Young People's Work, 
was the subject of an address by Rev. 
Brewer Eddy, assistant secretary. 

Communion services were held at the 
opening of the afternoon session. The 
officiating cler°-vmen were Rev. Judson 
Titsworth of Milwaukee, and Rev. J. 
P. Hugget of Galesburg, 111. 

The election of officers resulted as 
follows: „ ^ , , _ 

President. Samul B. Capen. L. L. D.; 
vice president. Henry C. King, D.D. ; 
foreign department — James L. Barton, 
D.D., secretary; Enoch F. Bell, assist- 
ant secretary- home department — C. H. 
Hatton. D.D.,' secretary; Brewer Eddy, 
assistant secretary; editorial depart- 
ment — E. E. Strong, secretary emeritus; 
William E. Strong, secretary; treasury 
department— Frank H. Wiggin, treasu- 
rer- John G. Hosmer. publishing ami 
purchasing agent: auditors— Edwin H. 
Baker. William B. Plunkett. Herbert J. 
Wells: district secretaries — Middle dis- 
trict. Charles C. Creegan, D.D., New 
York- interior district, A. N. Hitch- 
cock,' D.D., Cliicago: Pacific coast dis- 
trict, H. M. Tenney D.D.. Berkeley; 
prudential department — the president 
and vice president ex-offlcio, term ex- 
pires 1910, Herbert A. Wilder. Rev. Ed- 
ward M Noyes, Rev. Jolm H. Dennison. 
Rev George A. Hall: term expires 1911, 
A H. Wellmand, Rev. A. P. Fitch. 
Henry H. Proctor, Rev. Lucius H. 

Thayer. ^ .... .^ . c. 

The response was by President Sam- 
uel B. Gapen. L.LD., the venerable 
Boston merchant and executive of the 
board, who was president during the 
convention, and who has given his life 
to foreign miss ion work. 

SHOOTS AFTER 
ROAD DISPUTE 



Shawano, AVi.s.. Oct. 16, — While * 
Herman I>abutzke, 14 years of ijf 
age. was drivhig the cows home ^ 
he hit one with a shotgun to ^ 
hurry her aloiiK. Tlie gun was ^ 

* discharged and its contents .struck -t^ 
^ him in tlie .stomacli, killing him * 

* almost instantly. He live<l in tlie ^ 
^ ttmn of AVasliingion, about eight * 

* miles from Shawano. ^ 
*c ^ 

LITTLE GIRLS TO DRAW. 



Judge W'itten Announces Misses 
Who Decide First Fifty Locky Ones. 

Aberdeen, S. D., Oct. 16. — Judg* 
Written has selected two little girls to 
draw the first fifty names of the res- 
ervation land winners from a pile of 
75,000 to 100,000, on Oct. 20. The 
girls chosen are Josephine Burke, 9- 
year-old daughter of Congressman 
and Mrs. Charles H. Burke of Pierre, 
and Jeannette Hedger, 9-year-old 
daugher of Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Hedger 
of Aberdeen. 

Superstitious fear of Friday again 
kept away the applicants in the open- 
ing of the Cheyenne River and Stand- 
ing Rock reservations yesterday, and 
the day scored the lowest total since 
the opening at all points. 

The registration is more than half 
done now and indications are that it 
will fall far below the conservative 
estimate of 100,000 made at the open- 
ing. Over 50,000 will have registered 
at Aberdeen, but the outside points 
have failed to come up to expectations. 
Figures for yesterday: Aberdeen, 1.- 
375; total to date, 28,221. Bismarck. 
363; total, 5.250. Lebeau, 40; total, 
1 725. Lemmon, 87; total, 1,442. Mo- 
bridge. 40; total, 1,236. Pierre 164; 
total, 5.894. Total today, 2,269; grand 
total, 43, 968. 

BOATING ON BIG MUDDY. 

Capt. Baker, Old-Time Riverman, 
.Denies Industry Is Waning. 

Bismarck. N. D., Oct. 16.— That 
Capt. I. P. Baker, old-time river man 
and proprietor of a line of boats run- 
ning on the Upper Missouri river, be- 
tween this city and Fort Benton, 
Mont does not believe steamboating 
on the river is a thing of the past 
has been twice demonstrated in the 
past year 

Just 



J. C. THOKPE, 
Ada, Minn. 

of Ada, Minn., and Theodore Torge- 
son of Hendrum, Minn., but a former 
resident of Ada It is a new thing in 
North Dakota student circles to have 
three out-of-the-state men, and those 
three practically from one town, cap- 
ture all the honors 4n a Bingle event, 



then presidential candidate on the 
Prohibition ticket, cjir|stened the De- 
apolis, now the lar|ce6t brat on this 
part of the river, by breaking a bottle 
of Missouri river water over her bows. 
Tuesday he launched the largest 
barge that is engaged in handling 
freight between here and P'ort Ben- 
ton. 

This has been the best year that 
has ever been experienced in the 
steamboat business in this part of the 
country, and the boats will not be 
able to handle over 75 per cent of 
the traffic that is awaiting them. 
There are thousands of bushels of 
grain in McKenzie county depending 
entirely on river shipments that will 
not be put on the market before next 
spring. It is estimated that to mar- 
ket the grain by team across country 
would cost in the neighborhood of 60 
cents per bushel, and this makes that 
method prohi bitive. 

POWER COMPANY ELECTS. 

Annual Meeting of Water Company 
Held at Little Falls. 

Little Falls, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — A meeting of 



IHl^O. TORGESON, 
Hendrum, Minn. 

but such was the case when the gen- 
eral election of the senior class was 
held, it resulting in each one of them 
being elected. Mr. Lee was made 
president, Mr. Thorpe, vice president, 
and Mr. Torgeson, secretary and treas- 
urer. 



before. A formal motion was made 
before Judge Charles F. Amidon and 
an order entered transferring the case 
to the last calendar of the year. 

Jones was arraigned before the court 
to plead to the indictments returned 
by the grand jury in session in Fargo 
last spring. Through his counselor a 
plea of not guilty was entered. His 
bond was continued for his appearance 
on the opening day of court in this 
city. 

St. CIoud'M New Depot. 

St. Cloud, Minn., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Northern Pacific 
pas.<^enger depot is rapidly nearlng 
completion and will be ready for occu- 
pancy about Nov. 1. The structure is 
being erected at a cost of 525,000 and 
will be a great credit to the city. 

The building Is a one-story struc- 
ture 170 leet long, situated on the west 
side of the track about 350 feet from 
it. It is built of brown pressed brick 
of a very fine quality with a granit^ 
foundation. 

Ready for Dlnbannent Cane. 

Marinette, Wis., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Everything is now In 
readiness for the hearing of the dis- 
barment case against District Attorney 
A. E. Schwittay. The further action 
of Judge Stevens, who will hear the 
case, is awaited with Intense interest. 



Pierre S. D.— S. M. Howard of 
Gettysburg, this state, has been /or 
some time working on the model of 
a boat, by which he believes he can 
revolutionize traffic on Western rivers. 
He calls his invention the "aquaplane 
and the principle is a device which 
will cause the boat to glide upon the 
surface of the water instead of cut- 
ting its way through with a sharp 

^'ijevils Lake, N. D.— After several 
month.s- quibbling Ramsey county has 
been able to obtain a settlement with 
Benson county for the costs of the 
Shaffer horse thief case which was 
tried here on a change of venue from 
Benson county. 

Fargo, N. D.— An agreement was 
reached Thursday between State s At- 
torney \. W. Fowler for the prosecu- 
tion, Attorney Sam Stern for the de- 
fense and Judge A. G. Hanson, where- 
by the case of the state against Ben 
Horwltz, charged with assault and 
battery, goes over the term. 

Minot, N. D. — The shack in the alley 
back of the postoffice known as the 
'Tin Roof," was raided Tuesday even- 
ing by the police, as was the shack 
next to it. Several cases of beer were 
found in the second shack and empties 
were found in the -Tin Roof. Tw'o 
girls were arrested in the "Tin Roof 

^Fargo," N. D. — Members of the Arab 
patrol of El Zagal shrine announce 
that arrangements are being made for 
a ball which will be glv-en Thanks- 
giving eve, the proceeds of which will 
go to a fund to be used to send the 
team to New Orleans next year. 

Grand Forks. N. D.— Contractor R. 
McDonnell of Duluth spent Thursday 
in Grand Forks looking after the 
work on the various contracts that are 
being handled by him. According to 
statements made by him three of the 
contracts that he Is handling will be 
completed this fall, these being the old 
one that was let last year, the South 
Third street and the International ave- 
nue jobs. 

Bathgate, N. D. — The executive com- 
mittee of the County Teachers' asso- 
ciation has decided to accept the in- 
vitation of the Bathgate people, ex- 
tended through Supt. Robertson of the 
city schools, to hold the annual ses- 
sion of that association in this city 
and the date has been fixed at l* rl- 
day and Saturday, Nov. 5 and 6. 

Devils Lake, N. D.— Chief of Police 
Barnes arrested James Dolan, wanted 
on a charge of grand larceny. Dolan 
is the man who Is alleged to have 
robbed John Nelson a few nights ago. 
Nelson had just come in from thrash- 
ing and proceeded to get drunk when 
he fell in with Dolan. 



Neiiv AKkIn ComnilHnloner. 

Aitkin, Minn., Oct. 16. — P. O. Erick- 

the stockholders of the Water Power I son mayor of the village, and W. A. 

V,,. ,.,^c 1,^1/1 it thp oomoanv's Rathburn. chairman of the town board, 
company was held at the company s ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ elected L. 

offices on Wednesday. This was the 
annual meeting of the company and 
little business was transacted aside 
from the election of a board of di- 
rectors and officers. In this, the 
same men will act as did the past 
Vears, as follows: Directors, John L. 
McCague, Frank H. Parsons, M. M. 
Williams. T. C. Gordon, A. M. Mat- 
tice; president, John L. McCague, 
Omaha; vice president, Frank H. Par- 
eons, New York; secretary, treasurer 
and manager, T. C. Gordon. 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



E. Turner ag county commissioner for 
the First district of Aitkin county, in 
place of F. P. McQuillin, who resigned 
a month ago. 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



WASSON BOUND OVER. 



Chafin, 



bones, rheumatism, enlarged veins eczcm.. itch, 
DiiTiDles and eruptions of all descriptions. 
""ISefZmltles and Club Feet, curvature of th« 
spine, interrupted nutrition, slow growth in child- 
ren and wastine diseases in adults. 

Cancer, rlmor. Goiter, fistula. Piles, tuber- 
rvdarKltnds. rupture treated by hypodermic injcc- 
tS^^ method without the knife and pss of blood, 
varico^ veins, enlarged glands, cold hmbs and aL 

"Sa/e^^f W,». failing memory, lade of ener- 
gy, forgetfulness. falling of the hair sore throat 
Faisy, nervous weakness in old and young, bad 
circulation, etc. . , . • _ s_ *i,< 

Diseases of Women, headache, !»'"» '" |^ 
back, chronic diseases, deep seated diseases tr^t^ 
•cientifically as adopted by America s most emh 
<ient specialists. 

DR. REA & CO.. 
304 Tribune Bldg, Minneapolis, Minn. 



ENGRAVING AND PRINTING 

We can do engraving, but it has 
long since given way before high- 
grade letter pre.4« writing, which 
affords scope for originality and 

iio'.vnesH. 

MILLAR PRINTING CO, 

Dniuth 'Pbone 10O4. 



•c- 



CHICHESTER'S PILLS 

W_«p^ . TBK I>1AM».<«0 BRAND. yy 

<^ 




L«41mI Ask jmfw VrmmmUt for , 
CUl-^m^pur'M mammminnMiJ 
IMlla laR«4 ud Dald BctalllcX 
bo>«(. M«lc4 with Blua Ribbon. 
Tak* ■• •tkwr. Bmr •t y r ^_, 
Drasafot. AikfeTOIII.OBk*-TEBV 
DIAMOND BKAND FILLll. fc« ••. 
y«u« kDovB u Bast. 8*(itt. Alwajrt RdUbl* 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EV£ftYWM£U 



Wisconsin Farmer Shoots His 

Neighbor and May Face 

Murder Charge. 

Marinette. Wis., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Joe Scafranck is In jail 
here awaiting arraignment on a charge 
which it is feared may be murder. 

At 1 o'clock yesterday near the town 
of Crivitz he shot a neighbor, Stephen 
Laferski, a well known farmer, and the 
father of eight children, and his vic- 
tim is at St. Joseph's hospital. Menomi- 
nee hovering between life and death. 

The men had a dispute over the right- 
of-wav on a road and Scafranck came 
up behind his victim and shot him in 
the thigh with a shotgun. 

Dr. Steel and Dr. Walter Hicks found 
It necessary to amputate Laferskl's leg, 
and the man's condition Is extremely 
critical. _ 

SELF-DUMPING ( ARS 

CONTEST AT MARQUETTE. 

Marquette. Mich., Oct. 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — In the sec md of the copi- 
petitive tests between the Clark and 
Summers patent ore cars, which took 
place at the L S. & I dock Thursday, 
the Clark car made the better record 
by dumping fifty-six tons of Hematite 
ore In one minute, while the Summers 
car was one minute and ten seconds 
unloading forty-eight tons of the same 
grade of ore. Both cars were dumped 
with the assistance of three men. 
Fifty-six tons of the same ore were 




Is Held By the Ashland Municipal 
Court for Non-Support. 

Ashland. Wis.. Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The family troubles of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Wasson were 
aired in the municipal court, Wasson j Mackie,~ Jr. 
being brought to Ashlan<l from Du- 
luth to answer to the charge of non- 
BUDPort and abandonment of wire and 
three minor children. The case was 
tried before Justice A. I». McDonald. 
It being removed from Judge McCloud 
on the grounds of prejudit?e. 

Wasson and his wife have been re- 
siding in the city since the forest fires 
last fall destroyed their lome in the 
German settlement, and on the stand. 
Mrs. Wasson laid the entire trouble to 
drink, she saying that It was only at 
the times he was drinkin,? that Was- 
son did not provide for his family. The 
couple have been married twenty years 
and have three children, their ages 
being 18, 11 and 9. The evidence 
showed that Wasson provided gen- 
erously for his family until the latter 
part of August when he went to Du- 
luth. An offer to turn over the 
farm valued at about $1,00(» with incum- 
brances of $400 to Mr.s. Wasson and a 
payment of $10 a month to her by her 
husband was rejected by Mrs. Was- 
son. 

Wasson was bound over. 



WILLIAM P. KENNY. 

The annual conclave of the grand 
commandery of Wisconsin at Ashland 
this -/eek honored William P. Kenny 
of irflwaukee by electing him grand 
com<nan<ier. 



FARGO'S PROSPERS 

SHOWN IN POSTOFFICE. 

Fargo, N. D., Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Compared with fifty of 
the largest cities in the country, the 
business transacted in Fargo, as re- 
flected by the United Stanes postoffice 
receipts for the month cf September, 
was .39 per cent above the average. 
The Fargo increase ov<r the same 
period last year amounts to 12.22 per 
cent while the average of the fifty 
largest offices in the country is 11.83. 

Compared with other Northwestern 
cities, the figures for Fargo show up In 
fine shape. The increase per cent for 
Minneapolis is 8.24, for St. Paul 10.37, 
for Chicago 10.85. The decreases over 
the country were. Providence, 10.43; 
Nashville, 1.03; Scranton, 6.64, ana 
Chattano oga. 10.97. 

DEAD INSANE WOMAN 

BURIED AT MENOMINEE. 

Menominee. Mich.. Oct. 16. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The bC'dy of Mrs. 
Julia Seineisinka, who died in an in- 
sane asylum at Traverse City, was 
brought here for burial. The woman 
was the widow of an employe of. the 
J. W. Wells company, who was killed 
about a y ear ago. 

ANDY JONES' TRIAL. 

Accused Rugby Ex-Banker to Face 
Jury at Fargo. 

Minot, N. D., Oct. 16.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Andy Jones, the accused 
Rugby ex-banker, will be tried In 
Fargo at the November tsrm of United 
States court. ^^ , 

This was decided here this week, 
when attorneys for the prosecution and 
defense agreed to Fargo In place of 
Devils Lake, as had betm deciaed on 



Ashland — The new Ashland city di- 
rectory is out and copies are being de- 
livered to the various subscriber.s. 

Virogua — While unhitching a blind 
horse, Ernest Shlsler. aged 34, of Re- 
treat, received injuries which caused 
his death. The animal kicked him in 
the chest, throwing him over against a 
wagon. Shlsler died soon after being 
taken home. He leaves a wife and 
four children. 

Ashland — At the residence of Mr. and 
Mrs. Julius Kinkel, 311 Sixth avenue 
west, Thursday, occurred the wedding 
of Miss Johanna Zillsch and David 
The couple left in the 
evening for Chicago and Milwaukee 
for a two weeks' honeymoon trip and 
will be at home at 515 Tlftrd street 
east, where the groom has fitted up a 
home. 

Manitowoc — Injuries which he sus- 
tained In a fall on a stairway when he 
walked into an open trapdoor may 
cause the death of Richard Donovan, 
one of the best known pioneers of the 
county. Mr. Donovan has been blind 
for a number of years and in searching 
about hl.s home he fell through the 
door leading to the cellar. 

Oshkosh — The funeral services for 
Dr. W. A. Gordon, superintendent of 
the Northern Hospital for the Insane, 
who died in Chicago on Tuesday, was 
held from his residence at the hospital 
Friday noon. After the services the 
body was taken to the Episcopal 
church, where the services were un- 
der the auspices of the Masons. 

Shebovgan — The organized building 
trades workmen, comprising 300 mem- 
bers, have elected a salaried business 
agent, who will devote all of his time 
to the unions' affairs and whose salary 
will be paid by the unions Jointly. The 
new business agent is John Meyer, 
president and organizer of the local 
masons and bricklayers' union. His 
appointment holds until Jan. 1. 

Kenosha — Richard A. Kunke, con- 
victed of murder in the first degree 
in this county in 1872, and since that 
time a convict In the life row at 
Waupun, has appealed to the state 
board of control for a parole. 

Marshfield — Albert Pantzlaff. an aged 
farmer residing a mile from Auburn- 
dale was found dead beside the road 
near his home. He left Auburndale 



Calumet — At a meeting of the Calu- 
met Y. M. C. A. Indoor baseball team 
Wednesdi/ evening, Arthur Hocking 
was the unanimous choice for captain 
of the team. A manager has yet to 
be chosen. 

Houghton — The Portage township 
board has arranged to place a number 
of Tung.sten lamps on the Hurontown- 
Houghton road, south of the Hough- 
ton vlUagf. limits. They will be a con- 
tinuance of a lighting scheme which is 
carried to the limits by the village. 

Hancock — Arrangements are being 
made for the holding of a mass meet- 
ing at the Kerredge theater on Sunday 
afternoon, Oct. 24, in the Interests of 
the Prohibition party. A Mr. Herrlck, 
representing the Prohibition party, 
arrived In the city this week and ar- 
ranged with Manager Kerredge for the 
use of the theater on that date. 

Houghton — Charles W. Marquardt 
and Miss Edna M. Mitchell were quiet- 
ly married Thursday afternoon at the 
residence of the bride's uncle, Richard 
Mitchell, First street, West Houghton. 
The ceremony was performed by Rev. 
Frank B. Knowles, pastor of the First 
Presbyterian church, only relatives and 
immediate friends lielng present 

Calumet — The Calumet lodge of Elks 
have practically decided to organize a 
bowling league among its members. 
The matter was talked over informally 
Wednesday evening at the Elks' tem- 
ple, and was received with general fa- 
vor There are enough members to or- 
ganize a league of at least four teanis. 
If not six. These teams will be 
grouped under locations. 

Houghton — Frank Pummervllle, care- 
taker of Freda park, the Copper Range 
railroad resort at Freda, on the shore 
of Lake Superior, with his wife, had a 
narrow escape from possible injury or 
death during Monday night's storm, 
when their little building at the park 
was crushed by a falling tree. 

Laurlum — The autumn ball to be 
given by the members of the Calumet 
Boys' club at the First National bank 
hall of Laurlum on Friday evening, 
Oct 22. win be one of the finest events 
which have been given by this organ- 
ization for the season. The ha 1 w 11 
be especially decorated, and music will 
be rendered by the Calumet & Hecla 
orchestra. . . , , , 

Calumet — The night school classas 
which are being conducted at the Y. 
M C A of Calumet have been growing 
steadily since their organization last 
week, and the attendance Is very grat- 
ifying. ,, , 
Negaunee — Five new men, all or 
whom recently arrived here from the 
old country, have become members of 
the Negaunee City band, which was 
reorganized a few weeks ago. 

Sault Ste. Marie — ^The grocery store 
of James Eady. corner of Spruce and 
Ashmun streets, has been assigned to 



Moorhead — The budget of the board 
of education for the coming fiscal term 
asks for $19,000 for public school pur- 
poses $1,000 less than was asked for 
last year. Added to tlie $19,000 which 
will come into the treasury from the 
tax levied the board will receive $5,500 
from the state apportionment and high 
school aid funds. 

East Grand Forks — At the home of 
the bride on South Fourth street this 
week occurred the wedding of A. An- 
derson and Miss Mae McLoughlin. Rev. 
W. H. Georgi officiating. In the even- 
ing the young couple left for the Twin 
Cities. 

Sandstone — William Barnlck's big 
barn at Groningen was completely de- 
stroyed by fire about 6 o'clock. Friday 
morning, Oct.- 8. It started from an 
exploded lantern and little could be 
done to check the fire or to save the 
contents of the barn. The loss is only 
partly covered by insurance. 

Perham — Joseph Weis of Rush Lake 
has just finished thrashing and reports 
a yield of 2,800 bushels of grain from 
135 acres. 

Hinckley — A change was made this 
week in the management of the Com- 
mercial hotel. Andrew Okon. who has 
had control of the place for the past 
year retiring, and Mrs. I>onahue. the 
owner and former proprietor, esuining 
the management. 

Wadena — Potatoes did very well this 
year and the farmers have made money 
from this crop, notwitlistanding the 
price has been lower tlian usual. Some 
really wonderful yields have been re- 
ported from small tracts, but the larger 
fields are the one.s that show with what 
success potato raising may be engaged 
in up in this section. 

Moorhead — County Auditor Andrew O. 
Houglum has purchased the John Eld 
residence property at 310 Fourth street 
south. The consideration is not stated. 
It is understood tliat Mr. Eld and his 
family will go West, the objective point 
being Portland, Or. 

Staples — The bridge across the Crow 
Wing about four miles north of Staples 
is out of commission just at present. 
I.ASt Saturday the middle span went 
Into the river. 

Foley — A very pretty wedding was 
solemnized at the Catholic church at 
Princeton Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, 
when Kennedy Thomas of thif* place 
was united in marriage to Miss Lillian 
Kallher, a most estimable young lady. 
Big Fork — P. E. Peterson of Grants- 
burg, father to Mrs. A. Greeley and 
Mrs. A. M. Jensen, died at his home last 
Sunday morning after a prolonged ill- 
ness. Mr. Peterson was one of the most 
active and respective business men of 
his town, and has some property in- 
terests in this county. 

St. t:ioud — Mrs. Margaret Holland, 
wife of Jeremiah Holland of Santiago, 
and well known In St. Cloud, died at the 
home of her daughter, at Rudolph, 
Mont., Monday, having been In ill 
health for a long time. The remains 
arrived Saturday morning. 

Princeton — William L Hatch, Oswald 
King and L N. Grow have returned 
from Alaska — from the great Bonanza 
copper mountains. Mr. Grow was the 
first to arrive — he reached here oti 
Thursday last, while Messrs. Hatch and 
King put In an appearance Saturday 
evening. 

St. Cloud — Joseph Kemper, a well 
known farmer of the town of Melrose, 
died Tuesday in a hospital at Minneapo- 
lis, where he recently as a last resort 
underwent an operation for cancer. De- 
ceased was 40 years old and leaves a 
wife and four children. 

East Grand Fork.s— The transporta- 
tion business is on the boom, accord- 
ing to Manager William Sorenson of 
the Red River Valley Transportation 
company, and the time of the Red 
river's annual freezing will be anxiously 
watched for by the transportation offi- 
cials, for It means money to them. 
m 
StepbeuMon Mill Barns. 
Menominee, Mich., Oct. 16. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— The I. Stephenson 
Mill No. 1 at Wells, known as the Pine 
mill, was totally destroyed by fire at a 
loss of $40,000. The workmen fought 
the fire with great skill and energy and 
succeeded In confining the loss to the 
mill. The mill was equipped with new 
and up-to-date maclilnery and will be 
immediately rebuilt. 



HEINZE WINS FIGHT 

IN THE DAVIS-DALY. 

Portland. Me., Oct. IC— President F. 
Augustus Helnze of the Davis-Daly 
Copper company won a complete vic- 
tory overy the opposition element In 
the company yesterday at the annual 
meeting. The meeting had been held 
up nearly two weeks by a temporary 
Injunction, but the order was lifted 
yesterday. The board of directors 
elected was as follows: For three 
years, F. Augustus Helnze; for two 
years, H. Mason Dayborg and George 
Baglin and for one year, Maurice Levy 
and W. ~ "■ " ' " 



C. Shaw, all of New York. 



IN BED 

AND OUT 

After Taking Cardui, the Wdmao's 

Tonic, Mrs. Mills of Ivalde 

Says She Feels Like a 

New PersoD. 




TOWN IS QUITE A HUMMER 






A" 




^■(t.:^^^^^ 



JUmmm 



AS VALIER LOOKS TODAY 




seiuers. It was the first opening of Carey lands in Montana. 



Uvalde, Tex.— *'I was in be(i 
and out, writes Mrs. Thos. G. 
Mills of this town, "and could not 
do any of my housework. I have 
taken three bottles of Cardui, the 
woman's tonic, and am now able 
to do it myself and feel like a new 
person. 

"I am so thankful for your ad- 
vice and will always keep Cardui 
in my house." 

You should certainly waste no 
time in getting a bottle of Cardui, 
if you feel that you need a tonic. 

No one can know so well as you, 
whether you need one or not. If you 
feel weak, tired, languid, lazy, unable 
to work or take an interest in the 
things and people around you; if you 
are cross, irritable, easily vexed, feel 
like crying over trifles, and in general 
what folks call "out of sorts," you 
need a tonic— you need Cardui, the 
woman's tonic. 

You need not be afraid to take Car- 
dui freely and regularly, for as long a 
time as you feel it helps you. It is 
perfectly harmless, contains no drugs 
to form a habit, and can do you 
nothing but good. . . 

While Cardui is a medicine, it is a 
mild medicine, not a powerful dan- 
gerous, drug compound, that may ex- 
ert possible dangerous after-effects. 

No, its mild, beneficial action is 
perfectly safe, and does not interfere 
with any other medicine you may be 
taking, but its tonic action will help 
any other good medicine to do you 
more good. 

Try Cardui today. 



USHh- 



- 




^^;^ r»iii m ru tt K- 



I 



i-ioij." -^m 



4i I ■ 





i 



8 

THE EVENING HERALD 

AN IXDEPENOEi\T NEWSPAPER^ 

PubTished at Herald Bldg.. First St.. Duluth, Minn. 

THE HERALD COMPANY. 

Phones: Counting lioum. J24; Editorial Kooms. 11-6. 

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"TULUTHW^KLY HERALD 

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Entered at Duluth Postoffice as Seco nd-Class Matter. 

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MTARRItRTTrTaE CI FY, TErtESlTsTwEEK 

EVERY EVE\I>G— DELIVERED. 

■ 02 

Single copy, daily 45 

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Three months „ Jyj 

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' TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It Is important wlicn de.siiini? the address ot 
yDur paper changed to give both the old and new- 
addresses. 



A THO UGHT FOR T ODAY, 

T/ie reliffton of Christ reaches and changes 
the heart, which no other reiiyion does. 

— Winiam Dean JTotreJls. 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: 



DULUTH 'S PROGRAM. 

Something like the following is the program 
that the public spirit of Duluth, newly aroused and 
newly concentrated on a work that promises big 
and encouraging results, results that will make the 
work interesting and popular, has laid down for 

itself: 

To sec that Duluth gives of its best and gets 

all that is coming to it. 

To reduce the cost of living. 

To encourage the cultivation of near-by soil 

and, to that end, 

To provide a market for its products, that the 
producer may have the advantage of fair prices 
and that the consumer may enjoy lower cost and 
fresher goods; and, to the same end. 

To see that every facility is afforded for get- 
ting the product of near-by soil to the Duluth 
market, by way of fair service from the railroads, 
improvement of wagon roads and the construc- 
tion of rural trolley lines. 

To advertise the city's advantages. 
To develop hom.e industries, first of all by 
patronizing them in preference to the industries of 
other communities; and thereby, and in other 
legitimate ways, 

To attract to this city new industries that will 
employ Duluth citizens and build into the enduring 
foundation of Duluth the payrolls which consti- 
tute the only lasting foundation of a city. 

To require the railroads to give Duluth the 
natural advantages that belong to it by virtue of 
Its situation; to require the railroads to give the 
city and its people and its industries the best pos- 
Bible service at the fairest rates possible. 

To encourage home-building and home-owning 
in every possible way, but at the same time 

To do what is possible to reduce rental 
charges, and especially 

To provide suitable homes for working men at 
reasonable rents. 

To keep the taxes at the lowest level consistent 
with the proper care of the city's needs and the 
proper development of public facilities for busi- 
ness and comfort and happiness, and, to that end, 
To see that public business is conducted along 
sound and wise business lines, and that tried and 
approved business methods prevail in the conduct 
3f public affairs. 

To make the cause of Duluth the cause of every 
citizen, and to see that all join together in a con- 
certed, aggressive campaign to make Duluth 
greater, more prosperous, more populous and bet- 
ter to live in. 

To forward all public movements to better the 
living conditions of all of its people. 

To accomplish these ends by calm and peace- 
able methods if possible, but to fight for them if 
necessary. 

To these causes, which are really the one cause 
of the common good of city and people, The Her- 
ald dedicates anew all its energies and all it? re- 
sources; and so should every citizen, for there is a 
work for every man to do. 



doesn't make literature. 



lins absence of arguments against women's suf- thought with dictionary adornment, may make 
fr.-ige. Nobody, as yet, has given a single reason | pretty or puzzling or awe-inspiring phrases; but he 
why women shouldn't be allowed to vol-. Many, 
it is true, have talked at great length against 
women's suffrage; there is even an organization 
of women opposed to it that gets out a regular 
publication and tills many columns with matter 
hostile to the idea. But nobody offers any argu- 
ments, any convincing or even plausible reasons 
why women should not vote. 

Women haven't voted m the past, it is true; 
hut that isn't an argument except in the minds of 
that class of people with solidified, incrusted brains 
who think that because things have always been as 
they are, they must always remain as they are. 

Opponents of women's suffrage say that the 
women don't care to vote. That isn't an argu- 
ment, either; nor is it true. It may be that be- 
cause of their lack of incentive and opportunity to 
participate in discussions of public affairs a great 
many women haven't made up their minds whether 
they would care to become voters or not; it may 
even be that a number of women are quite positive 
they wouldn't care to vote. Well, they needn't; 
a very considerable number of men don't care to 
vote, cither, and they belong to the so-called re- 
spectable classes that do much talking — but nothing 
else — about political corruption. As to whether the 
masses of women would vote if they had the 
chance, statistics from the several states where 
women have been admitted to the full suffrage 
show that quite as large a percentage of women 
voters as of men voters exercise their privilege. 

The reason there hasn't been any reason given 
for refusing suffrage to women is that there isn't 
any reason; any good reason, that is. They don't 
vote because they haven't; they will vote because 
progress in its irresistible sweep will find their 
votes necessary to its evolutionary work. 

There is nothing half-hearted about Mr. How- 
ells in his advocacy of women's suffrage. Having 
announced himself upon the subject, he goes the 
whole way. This gifted author of '"A Traveler 
From Altruria" — which, by the way, it would be a 
good thing, even now that it is a generation old, 
if everybody would read — says that he is for the 
suffraget in any imaginable guise, even when she 
riots and smashes things. He doesn't believe that 
rioting and smashing things should in any way 
be taken as arguments adverse to the cause for 
which the rioters and smashers are rioting and 
smashing. And he is perfectly right there. It 
wouldn't be any fairer to condemn the cause of 
equal suffrage for its rioters and smashers than it 
would be to condemn the cause of religion for its 
hypocrites and its unwise zealots. Whether rioting 
and smashing gets the cause forward any is a ques- 
tion; probably, on the whole, it does, since it at- 
tracts notice to the idea and exhibits the earnest- 
ness of its advocates. Still, very likely there arc 
better ways by which to advance it. 



BIG WORDS VS. LITTLE WORDS. 

Gilbert K. Chesterton, the brilliant English 
essayist who has made himself master of the para- 
dox, has taken up the cudgels against the notion 
that Anglo-Saxon words are to be preferred, in 
literature, to words of Latin origin. This is really 
a contest between big words and little words, be- 
tween words of bullet-like conciseness and words 
of polysj'llabic splendor. 

Now a writer who makes himself master of the 
paradox finds it necessary to combat many accept- 
ed notions, and it is -not surprising if, very often, 
he finds himself engaged in a bad and untrue cause. 
This is true of Mr. Chesterton. He has been called 
the "twentieth century Dr. Johnson;" not alone be- 
cause he affects polysyllables, as the great lexi- 
cographer did, but because he is dogmatic and 
moral and deeply religious. That he does possess 
a rich vocabulary, and that he does deal largely in 
large words, is unquestionable; but no reader of his 
excellent literary output can escape the fact that 
when he seeks force' and clearness in exposition, 
he realizes as well as anybody the power there is 
in simplicity of diction. 

Mr. Chesterton says that Freeman was largely 
responsible for the barring of big words from good 
literary society— if they ever were barred. The 
students of Anglo-Saxon, elate wiUi their own 
scholarship, tried to impose their ideas on their 
countrymen and American cousins. '"People," says 
Mr. Chesterton, "were trying to be Anglo-Saxon 
instead of English." II is objection to wiiting 
Anglo-Saxon instead of English is that "the Anglo- 
Saxon vocabulary is one of the smallest in the 
world, while the English vocabulary is one of the 
largest." 

Ingenious, if not ingenuous. It is true that the 
-Anglo-Saxon vocabulary is small; but its slender 
proportions cover a wide range of human passions 
and essentials. Wife, tnotlier, father, hate, love, 
fear. rage, spin, dig. hunger, thirst, pain, joy — tlie 
Anglo-Saxon vocabulary, small though it is, sweeps 
the gamut of human experience and sings the tre- 
mendous song of human life in notes clear and 
vibrant and penetrating. The English vocabulary 
is large, indeed, but what a clumsy, ^>onderous, 
futile thing it would be without its Anglo-Saxon 
foundation! 

The trouble with Mr. Chesterton's argument is, 



"DO IT FOR DULUTHI" 

"If Duluth supported home industries she would 
now be boasting ^ population of 150,CKK) i;o 200,000,* 
said a local manufacturer in The Herald last even- 
•ng. T- 

"We do not seem to be able to toueh the Du- 
luth dealers," said the manager of a coffee-roasting 
house in the same article, ''although we more than 
hold our own in other states, where the competi- 
tion is keen jind hard." 

Another local manufacturer said that if his con- 
cern had depended upon Duluth trade for its sup- 
port it would not have outgrown its swaddling 
clothes, though it has prospered greatly on its 
outside trade. 

All agreed that The Herald's campaign to inter- 
est the people in patronizing home industries is 
timely and necessary, and that if the people of this 
city will carry out the idea in all their purchases, 
they can do more to build up the city than is pos- 
sible in any other single way. 

These are sharp words, some of them, but they 
are true words. It isn't prejudice against local 
industries, because there is no such prejudice. It 
isn't because goods made elsewhere are better, be- 
cause they are not. It isn't because foreign goods 
are cheaper than goods made in Duluth, because 
as a rule they are not. "it is nothing more or less 
than plain forgetfulness. The people haven't 
thought to insist upon supporting home industries 
by buying the things made here. The Herald is 
trying to make them think of it, and it is confident 
that if they ever begin thinking of it there will be 
a sharp revolution in buying practices in this city. 

And they are thinking of it. From every quar- 
ter The Herald receives strong encouragement in 
its fight for home industries, and assurances that 
the people are taking hold of it. The people must 
do the business; all The Herald can say about it 
won't add a single man to a Duluth pa /roll if the 
people do not catch the spirit of it and insist on 
getting goods made in Duluth where they are 
obtainable. 

And if the people do this, the good i: will do is 
almost incalculable. Persistent and constant buy- 
ing of home products will not only increase the 
number of men employed in the industries now 
located here, but will advertise the city as a good 
place to locate new industries. This one campaign 
alone, if taken up in earnest and prosecuted faith- 
fully by all the people, could be made to double the 
population in five years. 

Duluth wants more workers employed in her 
industries because productive workmen make pay- 
rolls, and payrolls make cities. The great gain 
there would be in centering upon the industries of 
Duluth all the money now sent to support indus- 
tries and workmen in other communitie? would not 
only increase Duluth's population, wealth and in- 
dustry, but would react to the benefit of every citi- 
zen n'^w here. 

Buy Duluth-made goods. Do it for Duluth's 
sake, for your neighbor's sake, and for your own 
sake. 

DO IT FQR DULUTH! 



THE OPEN COURT. 



(Headem of Tlie Herald are liirttwl to make free 
use of this column to express tlieir Ideas about live 
topics of general interest. Letters should not exceed 
300 words — the shorter Uie better. They must be writ- 
ten en one side of the paper only, and ihcy must be 
accompanied in erery case by the name and address 
of the WTiter. though these need not be published. 
A kUned letter U always mure effeoUre however.) 



WHY NOT PUBLISH LIST. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I would like to suggest to the Com- 
mercial club, through your "Open 
Court" column, that the names of the 
contributors to tlie fund which is be- 
int' raised to carry on a. campaign for 
better railroad facilities be published. 

There has been a lot of talk about 
raising this money and public-spirited 
business houses have been urged to 
donate to the fund. I think It proper 
that the names of those who do 
give should be made known to the 
public. It would give the people of 
tlie city an opportunity to find out 
which corporations and business houses 
are the most public-spirited and have 
the greatest interest in the advance- 
ment of the city. 

I would like to give my business to 
the concerns which give something 
toward the fund, and I think it rig^t 
that I and the rest of the public 
should know who our real friends are. 
AN EAST ENDER. 

Duluth. Oct. 15. 

STINGAGAIN. 



THE WEATHER. 



CLOVDY I 




To the Editor of The Herald: 

"A Collegian" is stung again. "Will- 
iam Norman Guthrie knows German 
too. He showed it last night in his 
lecture on the German drama. "A Col- 
legian" thought he only knew French. 

And by the way this attack on Mr. 
Guthrie seems to have helped him. 
The audience last evening was the 
largest of the present course. 

A. SUBSCRIBER, 

Duluth, Oct. 15. 



The storm seems 
to be over, and Du- 
luth can settle 
back for another 
period of delight- 
ful weather, appar- 
ently. 

Yesterday was 
a beautiful fall day, 
and today, while 
the sky Is overcast, 
it is pleasant out 
of doors. The 
weav..'..,r man looks for partly cloudy 
weather tonight with little change in 
temperature. 

A year ago today it was fair and 
warm. 

The sun rose this morning at 6:26 
and will set at 5:21, making ten hours 
and fiftv-two minutes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Tile western high barometer area 
has advanced Its center to the Dakotas 
attended by somewhat colder weather 
over the greater portion of the two 
states. Freezing temperature is the 
rule throughout the Northwest. The 
barometer is low over the St. Lawrence 
valley and Arizona. During the past 
twenty-four hours the disturbance 
overlying the former district caused 
snow or rain in the lake region and 
Atlantic states. Indications favor gen- 
erally fair weather at the Head of the 
Lakes tonight and Sunday." 




■TILBC 



mi 



and 
last 



Following were the minimum 
maximum temperatures of the 
twenty-four hours: 

Hin. MiX. { Mln. Max 



A WORTHY CAUSE. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I would like to call the attention of 
The Herald subscribers to a very 
worthy cause. Next Monday is dona- 
tion day for St. Luke's hospital. The 
work being done by the hospital is too 
well known to Duluth people to need 
comment here. It is a splendid in- 
stitution, and should have the gen- 
erous support of Duluth citizens. Mon- 
day is the one day in the year set 
aside for receiving donations, and I 
trust that Duluth people will respond 
generously. A PHYSICIAN. 

Duluth. Oct. 15. 



Atlanta . . 
AsliisvlUe 
Atlanta . . 
Rattltfurd 
Hismarck 



..61 
...42 
...48 
...24 
...24 



WHY SHOULDN'T WOMEN VOTE? 

In an authorized interview conveying his com- 
plete sympathy with the cause of women's suf- 
rage, William Dean Howells calls attention to the 
interesting and significant lack of any real argu- 
ments against extending to women the right to 
vcrte. 

Anybody who has given the slightest attention 
to this subject must have been strtu:k by the start- 



THE "MELANCHOLY" DAYS. 

The melancholy days are come, the saddest of 

the year. 
Of wailing winds and naked woods and 

meadows brown and sear. 

— B)"yant. 

It is melancholy, perhaps, to witness the pass- 
ing of the summer's glories, but it is splendid to 
witness the golden season of harvest with its 
fruitful yield of wealth and plenty; for Browning 
spoke truth when he said that "spring shall plafit 
and autumn garner to the end of time." It is sad 
enough to find the summer's warmth tC'Uched with 
a hint of chill that forecasts the wintry blasts; 
but the early hint of coolness ripens the bountiful 
crops and prepares the way for the golden yield 
that is now bathed in the glories of the harvest 
moon. 

It is unpleasant to some, no doubt, to see the 
summer's green turning brown and gold and crim- 
son; but these colors have splendors all their own, 
and so the season has delights that rone of the 
ripe luxuriances of summer can excel. There is a 
new crispness in the breeze that sends the blood 
pulsing more vigorously through its veins, carry- 
ing with it a new sense of well-being. There is a 
mellowness in the midday's warmth that makes it 
more delightful than the harsher heat of summer 
days. There is a brisk, invigorating zest in the 
night air that makes you walk a little faster and 
that sends you to bed covered with a rosy glow of 
comfort and health that brings on a nignt of peace- 
ful, restful sleep, fitting you to meet the tasks of 
the next day with greater relish and clearer brain. 

The change began long ago. Summer's richest 
green lasts but for a moment. Some time in early 
July the leaves reach their fullest growth, and the 
woods are rich in their deepest, finest shades of 
green. The next moment, almost, the i;urn begins, 



and as the summer waxes hints of brown begin to 
like many of his arguments in favor of paradoxes j tarnish the 'forests before anybody thinks of fall, 
devised to attract interest and to create the shock The simple, delicate blossoms of spring give way 



of surprise, that it tilts at a cause that does not 
exist. Nobody advocates confining English speak- 
ing and English writing to Anglo-Saxon. Much 
richness would be lost by such a plan. Nobody, 
whether Anglo-Saxon scholar or not, has denied 
the power and beauty brought by the flood 01 
Latin-born words that came with the Norman con- 
quest. But all good authorities, and most good 
writers, council and use the short, expressive word 
rather than the long, confusing and awe-inspiring 
mouthful of syllables which Johnson — and Chester- 
ton after him — preferred. 

The object of writing and speaking is still to 
convey thought. The less that thought is encum- 
bered, the better it carries. A thought couched in 
simple, direct and widely-understood diction hits 
the mark; it is literature. A thought loaded down 
with polysyllables and strange, unfamiliar words 
is a thought in disguise; its form attracts notice 
sooner than its substance, and that is a test of bad 
writing. 

Mr. Chesterton, as usual, advocates his cause 
brilliantly and plausibly, if not convincingly. Ht 
is always brilliant, always plausible; but he is nol 
a4ways sincere. The man that has a thing worth 
saying and says it, makes literature. The man 
that has nothing to say, and disguises his lack of 



to the richer, more brilliant and more complex 
blossoms of summer; and then these, in turn, give 
place to the still more intricate composite flowers 
that herald the coming of autumn — the goldenrod, 
the aster and their kin. So although one waxes up 
some morning and discovers that fall has come, it 
has been on the way a long time — ever since mid- 
summer, in fact. 

Bryant's lines, untrue as they are an^ libelous 
though they be, have served, by coming into every 
day use, to turn mankind against one of its most 
delightful seasons — the ripe season of fruition 
when nature, preparing for the hibernation of 
winter, makes ready the seeds that will burst forth 
after the snows have gone in the glorious and 
eternally significant resurrection of spring. Autumn 
days are not "the saddest of the year;" in their 
fruitfulness and their splendid yield of plenty they 
are in many ways the most delightful. Keats did it 
better when he spoke of autumn as "the season of 
mist and mellow fruitfulness;" and Longfellow did 
it better still when he said: 

Magnificent autumn! He comes not like a 
pilgrim, clad In russet weeds; not like a her- 
mit, clad in gray; but like a warrior with the 
stain of blood on his brazen mail. — His crim- 
son scarf is rent; his scarlet banner dripping 
with gore: his step like a Hail apon the 
Uir«8hins tloor. 



One VVuw Aever C'auie Back. 

Kansas City Star: 'The One Who 
Never Came Back" was a new.spaper 
headline of last week in recounting the 
various expeditions to the North Pole. 
Of tiie long list of those who have 
braved the frigid terrors of the Arctic 
seas In the interest of science or to 
grasp the will-o'-the-wisp of fame 
there are endless tales to stir the souls 
of men and arouse sympathy, but it is 
the chapter dealing witli "the one who 
never came back" from which the- world 
turns witii a shudder. It Is twelve years 
now since Js. A. Andree made his daring 
and, as it has proved, foolhardy attempt 
to sail over the North Pole in a balloon. 
How he perished, and wlien and where, 
is one of the secrets locked in the icy 
fastness of the region of everlastit g 
cold. What terrible suffering, what 
horror of loneliness and despair beset 
him before he perished is dreadful to 
contcnii>lat.e 

Andree was a Swede. He was a mem- 
ber of the Swedish international polar 
expedition of 18S2 and 1S83. and Jin 
aeronaut of considerable skill. He had 
his own ideas about reaching tlie goal 
of the ages. He had observed that at 
certain seasons of tlie year a steady 
current of air flowed toward the North 
Pole. What could be easier, argued 
Andree, than for a well eciuipped 
balloon to set sail in this current of 
air, float over tlie pole, descend, take 
observations, and then lloat away 
again to carry the word to a waiting 
world. 

Desperate as appeared tlie undertak- 
ing, Andree found men who were will- 
ing to aid him in carry it out. Even 
more, he found two men who were will- 
ing to take tlie slender chance with him 
and stake their lives for fame and 
adventure. 

Oscar, late king of Sweden, was 
among those who gave their support to 
the venture. It was in 1896 that Andree 
went North to Danes Island, Spitzber- 
gen, and made preparations for the 
journey. A balloon house was built, 
and the big bag was inilajed. It was 
found, however, that the gas escaped 
more rapidly than was expected, and 
the trip was postponed a year. Two 
Swedish war vessels escorted the ex- 
pedition to Spitzbergen the following 
June. Experiments had sliown that tiic 
gas would keep the balloon afloat 
thirty days. The plan was to have the 
balloon drift along about 800 feet 
above the surface of the ice. Of men, 
freight, food and ballast tlie craft car- 
ried a weight of about five tons. 

A favora,ble breeze was awaited. At 
last, July 11. 1S97, it came. The ropes 
were cut and the balloon shot upward. 
Suddenly, for some reason never known. 
It dropped rapidiy almost to the surface 
of the se.a. Ballast was thrown out by 
the men on board, and the balloon arose 
again and sailed away over the moun- 
tainous island of Vogelsang, an altitude 
of 1,500 feet being necessary to make 
the uassase. 

When tne watchers on shore and on 
the v.-ar vessels lost sight of the balloon 
it was the world's last glimpse of 
A.ndree and his two intrepid com- 
panions. Three message buoys dropped 
by .Andree the Jay tlie start was madc- 
have been found. The latest was dated 
at 10 o'clock that night. An altitude 
of 82 degrees, 8 degrees from the pole, 
liad been reached at that time. The 
brave aeronaut reoorted that all was 
v.ell. But of the ultimate fate of the 
balloon and its passengers searchers 
have found never a sign. 

_ ■ 

It UeaeheM Cactus Center. 
Down here in Cactus Center we was 

gittin' somewhat peeved 
As to just which pole explorer was to 

have his yarn believed; 
We had took sides in the matter, and 

the poker game was shook. 
While some rooted hard for Peary and 
the others yelled for Cook. 

Pocos Johnson said, some sneerin', that 

the common daily feed 
Of the most of Cook's supporters was 

a mt-ss of loco weed. 
Whereupon Bear Hawkins answered 

that it bothered him a heap 
When he found that Peary's boosters 

was jest fit for herdin' sheep. 

It was then, or shortly after, that the 

barkeep ducked his head, 
'Cauise the atmosphere was vibrant 

with the song of fiyln' lead: 
There was sounds of busted glasses, 

and the door was clean unhinged 
When we drifted to the sidewalk. 

somewhat punctured, bruised and 

singed. 

Now we're strlvin". here In Cactus, fer 

to keep abreast of things. 
But we've drawed one line quite firmly 

sence we counted up our stings; 
And if any North Pole hunter comes to 

lecture, at high cost. 
We'll inform him, ere he opens, that 

he's bound to git a frost. 
Arfhur Chapman in Denver Repub- 
lican. 

DnM Ewle "Welbliehe. 

"Give me a kiss for a guerdon," 
Said the knight to his ladye fair, 

"Give me a kiss for a guerdon. 
And a tress of tliy golden hair. 

"For I go to a far countrle 
At the head of my merrie men, 

And those that return to those that go 
forth 
Are only as one to ten," 

And she gave him a kiss for a guerdon 
And a tress of her golden hair. 

And sorrowed a while — then married a 
prince 
In the manner of ladyes fair, 
— Walter E. Reid in New York Sun. 

May Be n MoUycoddlP Sport. 

New York World: And in the whole 
week at Rheims the flying men neither 
killed nor hurt any one. 



Uiislon 42 

Buiralo :iS 

Cairo it 

Caigao' SO 

Charleston 52 

Chicago 34 

ClncliiimU 40 

1^ iicoruia :>6 

Davenport 34 

Uwiver 4:) 

Ucirwlt 34 

Devils Ijike 30 

Dcdge 42 

DULUTH 34 

Udmuiiton 20 

H Paso 52 

I-:scaiiaba 34 

(Jalvestcn 74 

Green bay 32 

Omnd Haven 42 

Ha\rf 32 

Helena 32 

Ilougliton 40 

Huron 26 

Jacksonville 56 

Kamluops 40 

Kansas City ....46 

Kuoxvllle 40 

La Croaee 32 

LaiuliT 36 



UUle Kock 54 76 

h'li Angeles 56 62 

Marquette 36 48 



88 'Me<Uciiie Hat 28 

r>6 Mempias 50 

04 NUles City 28 

54 MiiMauk(>e 32 

54 Minnril ia, 22 

56 MiKiena 34 

46 MoniKi^mery 48 

68 .Mourhead 31 

50 New Orltans 64 

76 New York 44 

44 Norfolk 40 

50 NortliHeld 28 

68 Nr.rth Platte 31 

54 Oklahoma 56 

74 Umaha 38 

46 Phoenix 60 

44 Pierre 28 

72 Pitwburg 38 

42 Port Arthur 34 

50 PorUand. Ur 44 

88 Prince Albert 30 

44 Ilapid City .30 

78 St. Loui3 46 

42 St. Paul 34 

44 San AntonlJ 68 

56 8an J'rancisto 54 

50 Santa I'"e 40 

42 Sauk ate. Marie :t4 

60 Shrevepurt 62 

84 Spokane 42 

48 .»^wift Current 22 

68 I Washington 44 

62 Wiclilta 50 

42 VVlUiston 14 

64 1 Winnemuoca 34 



Winnipeg 26 

Yellowstone 30 



50 
70 
58 
44 
34 
74 
74 
42 
84 
58 
80 
62 
68 
80 
62 
90 
62 
48 
44 
70 
38 
60 
62 
42 
92 
56 
72 
40 
82 
62 
5D 
60 
70 
54 
78 
44 
62 



Department of Agriculture, Weather 
Bureau, Dulutii, Oct. 16. — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Sunday. Duluth. Superior and vicinity 
including the Mesaba and Vermilion 
iron ranges: Partly cloudy weather 
tonight and Sunday: not much change 
in temperature; moderate westerly 
wind.s. probably shifting to easterly 
toniglit. 

H. W. RICHARDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



Chicago, Oct. 16. — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 

\\'iscansin, Iowa and Minnesota — 
Generally fair tonight and Sunday. 

Upper Michigan — Partly cloudy and 
continued cold tonight and Sunday 
with snow near Lake Superior. 

South Dakota — Generally fair to- 
night and Sunday; warmer Sunday. 

North Dakota — Generally fair to- 
nigiit and Sunday; warmer Sunday 
and in Northwest portion tonight. 

Montana — Partly cloudy tonight and 
Sunday; warmer tonight in east por- 
tion; colder in extreme west portion 
Sunday. 

.^ttraclious ot tbe North Pole. 

Memphis Commercial Appeal: No 
pennant flying at the pole. 

No trains robberies. 

No political platforms made to be 
broken. 

No betting on races. 

No drunks and disorderlies. 

No Turkish baths. 

No chop suey joints. 

No social clubs. 

No union station. 

No police. 

No Salome dance. 

No fire department. 

No baseball fans. 

No baby dolls and sheath gowns. 

No bargain sales. 

No undesirable citizens. 

No strikers and strike-breakers. 

No Thaw case. 

No magazine poetry. 

No book-worms or boll-weevils. 

No near beer. 

No night riders. 

No grafters. 

No iiole in the treasury. 

No sixteen to one. 

No tariff revision, speeches. 

No automobile scorcliing. 

No street car hogs. 

No Merry Widow hats. 

No Standard Oil wells. 

No newspaper with the largest cir- 
culation in tlie world. 

No nature fakers. 

No Carnegie libraries. 

No coal-smoke nuisance. 

No cliewing gum peroxides. 

No complaints of the heat. 

No steel or sugar trust. 

No farmers howling for or against 
rain. 

No revivals. 

No juicy divorce scandals. 

No weather reports. 

No Queenio with her hair in a braid. 

No Ultimate Consumer or Innocent 
Bystander. 

No pianolas or megaphones. 

No color line or race war. 

No Red-Nosed Angels or Star-Eyed 
Goddesses. 

No Shakespeare-Baconian contro- 

ver.sy. 

No liquor problem. 

No jags, odorless or otherwise. 

No political parsons. 

No candidates for office. 

No Insurance solicitors. 

No messenger boys on bicycles. 

No cook ladles. 

No breakfast food or specialists. 

No mosquitoes or fleas. 

No hazing. 

No pellaogar or arteriosclerosis. 

No Holy Rollers. 

No habeas corpus, government by 
injunction or initiative and referen- 
dum. 

No market reports. 

No tanglefoot soirees. 

No dives or gambling hells. 

No fear of invasion. 

No muck-rakers or mollycoddles. 

No nolitlcai pulls. 

No hell. 

No pole. 

. • ' 

(knandary of a IVeifro. 

Washintiton Post: Clark Howell of 
Atlanta tells a good story about a 
n« srro. 

"He had been working around a 
garage for about six months." said Mr 
Howell, "and happening to meet him, 
I a.-^ked how lie was getting along. 

" 'Fine.' s'lld he 

"'I suppose you know everything 
about an automobile now, Tom?" I 
said. 

" 'Yes, sir. I knows a lot about dem 
cars, for I'se been working under dein. 
and over dem, and all around dem. 
But dere Is is Just one thing about dem 
automobiles dat puzzles me,' said 
Tom. 

'"What's that?' I asked. 

"•Well sir, Mr. Howell. I can't Er^t 
it into mv head how they make 'em go 
without hitching a hor.°e to 'em.'" 

. • 

Reflect lonM of a Bachelor. 

New York Press: A college educa- 
tion is worth all It costs to get over it. 

When a strong man loses his grip 
he loses his soul. 

Even neighbors are useful because 
you can talk about them. 

The reason we talk so much about 
the weather Is we hate other people 
for doing It. 

Sometimes It seems as If a woman 
could love a man Just because he is 
beneath contempt. 



"Be Somebody." 

This laconic injunction caught my 
eye the other day. It was the first 
headline of a bold-faced advertise- 
ment proclaiming the advantages of a 
certain school of correspondence. It 
offered attractive courses In engineer- 
ing, architecture, electricity and a 
number of otlier branches of learning, 
and the inducement held fortli was that 
it does not pay to settle down lazily 
in a minor position wlien by gaining 
more information one's services would 
command a higher salary. I can 
imagine that sucli an advertisement 
would appeal powerfully to many 
young men. It suggests a differentia- 
tion of oneself from the common herd 
a striking out boldly with the hope 
and expectation of amounting to some- 
thing. 

The nobodies are all about us. Some 
of them are amiable, well-meaning 
persons. But they lack ginger and 
go. Negative, colorless tijey are when 
the world wants men of conviction, 
men of action. 

Not so were the men who have really 
contributed something to humanity. 
"Be somebody" wliispered a voice in 
the ears of "Tyndale early in the Six- 
teenth century and lie set his teeth and 
said, "If God spares my life 1 will make 
it possible for u-ny plc>wi)oy in England 
to read the Bible in his own tongue." 
"Be somebody" was the bugle call a 
century ago to Samuel J. Mills, the 
American pioneer of the modern mis- 
sionary movement, and he wrote in hia 
diary, "No young man ouglit to think 
of living without trying to make his 
influence felt around the globe." "Bo 
somebody" said the inward monitor to 
Frances Willard. and out of her brain 
and heart came the splendid develop- 
ment of the Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance union. 

"Be somebody" was the terse com- 
mand tliat spurred William Booth on 
to organize the Salvation Army. 

And thus, time after time, to the 
country lad hoeing his father's corn, 
to the city clerk not content with be- 
ing a mere drudge, to the society maid- 
en weary of her gayeties to the middle- 
aged, man conscious that there is yet 
another chance before the night closes 
in upon him has come this incisive 
voice bidding the one addressed cease 
being "anybody" or "nobody" and rise 
to the dignity of "somebody." 

It is a noble command. We are meant 
to be somebodies, to count for all we 
are worth, to play the game through 
fairly and vigorously and never be 
quitters or shirks. The manager of a 
great corporation said recently that 
he sought for men to become agents of 
his company who could impress their 
individuality upon those with whom 
the concern did business so that they 
would not think of It as an abstract 
entity, but would personify it in the 
faces and figures of its cheery, whole- 
souled drummers. Today, as of yore, 
when conditions were far simpler, 
people like to do business not with a 
tremendous affair known as the Amal- 
gamated Hairpin company. Limited, 
but with Jones and Smith and Brown. 

If we cannot be somebody in the eyes 
of the big world we can be within a 
limited area. We can be somel)ody to 
our children, our friends, our neigh- 
bors, our churcli associates, and the 
secret is first to build ourselves up in 
the finest graces and virtues and then 
to expend them lavislily on others. 

THIO I'AttSON. 



A MOMENT WITH THE \> ITS. 

Cleveland Leader: "No. Mr. Sparks. 
I can never marry you. Yoi> have no 
consideration for the feelings of my 
motlicr." 

"Why. what makes you thitik that'" 
"Vou hung your hat over the key- 
hole before you started to propo.se lo 
me." 



Cleveland Leader: Editor — I hear 
you reft?rred to nowadays, too often, as 
a "cheap liumorist." 

Humorist — Thank you, sir. 

Editor — Wiiy thank me? 

Humorist — 1 supposed that you were 
about to make my salary such that 
the taunt would be no longer just, 

Newark Star: Miss K. — I'm told 
your husband, under the influence of 
wine at the dinner the other night, de- 
clared he had 'married beauty and 
brains." 

Mrs. B. — Well, well! How nice! 

Mi.ss K. — Nice? Aren't you going to 
investigate? Evidently he's a bigamist. 

Newark Standard: Trotter — During 
mv travels in Italy I was captured, 
bound and gagged by bandits. 

Miss Homer — How romantic! Were 
they anything like tne bandits in the 
opera? 

Trotter — No, indeed; the gags they 
used were all new. 



Brooklyn Life: Mrs. Crawford — You 
say it is impo.ssible to get any money 
out of your husband. Have you gone 
about it in the right way? 

Mrs. Crabshaw — I've tried everything, 
my dear, except sending him a Black 
Hand letter. 



Louisville Courier-Journal: "I think 
my boy may turn out to be a champion 
pugilist." 

"Scrappy, Is he?" 

"Just the contrary. He palavers a 
good bit, but no kid on the block has 
been able to talk him into an actual 
combat as yet." 



London Opinion: A tourist while 
traveling in the north of Scotland, far 
away from anywhere, exclaimed to 
one of the natives: "Why, what do 
you do when any of you are ill? Xou 
can never get a doctor." 

"Nae, sir, replied Sandy. 'We've jist 
to dee a naitural death." 



Louisville Courier Journal: "Was it 
love at first sight on her part?" 

"I hardly think so. The first time 
they met he had on automobile sog- 
gles." 

Modern Society: "I understand your 
son is a hard student." 

"Hard? Wliy, his muscles are like 
iron." 



Harper's Weekly: Bore — Do you be- 
lieve oyster.s have brains? 

Bored — Certainly 1 do, sir. since they 
know wiien to siiut up. 



Illustrated Bits: Madam — What do 
you mean by coming home at 3 in the 
morning? 

Monsieur — I ashshure you. m'dear. iss 
not my fault. The cafe lias only jusa 
shut up. 

Chicago News: Biggs — ^That fellow 
Oliver is inclined to be somewhat con- 
trary, isn't he? 

Diggs — Contrary! Say, if he had two 
ideas in his head they would fall out 
with each other. 

Pointed ParasrapbH. 

Chicago News: A wise workman lets 
the boss have his own way. 

Every man makes a satisfactory 
husband — for a few days. 

People who get rich quick usually 
get rid of it the same way. 

If you have a good friend don't spoil 
it all bv imposing on him. 

The weather eventually gets back at 
the people who talk about It. 

Opinions and visits are more appre- 
ciated when not forced upon people. 

A woman says unprintable tilings 
about as gracefully as she throws a 
brick. 

A small boy is never so happy as 
when he Is riding and eating at the 
same time. 

You can save a lot of time by being 
sure, where you want to go before 
starting. 

The first time a girl is disappointed 
in love she Imagines she has nothing 
left to live for. 

A woman's Idea of a tactful man Is 
one who is able to increase the admir- 
ation she has for herself. 

An office seeker's love for his coun- 
try is a good deal like that of a titled 
foreigner for an American heiress. 

It is said that most suicides regret 
it after swallowing the fatal dcr«e — 
just as some men do after gettlnff 
married. 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: SATURDAY. OCTOBER 16, 1909. 




TWENTY YEARS AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date. 158?. 



•••.lames Billings, presiiiont. 
Marine Bank of Duluth, is now 
In Scotland. 



of the 
travel- 



••♦It is an unu.sual and rather In- 
terestins: phase of the Dulath lumber 
trade that .sawn timber Is being 
shipped to Winnipeg and beyond from 
here. Despite the J2 per 1.000 feet. 
levied on all lumber carried Into Cana- 
da fri>m thl.s country, these shipments 
will amount to 5.000,000 or 6.000.000 
feet, about half of wiiich comes from 
tlir Duluth. much of the rest from 
Brainerd. 



•••The growth of tlie electric light 
business in Duluth has been very rapid. 
Five years ago the Thomson-Houston 
company endeavored to interest local 
capitiil to put in ii plant. So tearful 
were l>uluth people of such a step that 
they could not be led into the under- 
taking, and the Lynn company put in 
the plant Itself. It was u sort of 
"one-horse affair." two arc dynamos, 
steam lilred from Scott & Holston's 
mill on I.iake avenue, and Supt. Will- 
iam Burgess the only attendant. That 



-^— i= 



wa.s five vears ago. Now there are two 
companies, both local, with arc light 
capacity of 350 and incandescent capa- 
city for 5.000 lamps, and the old coni- 
pany alone has sixteen men on Its 
pay roll. 

• ••Mayor J. B. Sutphin has just 
closed a deal with DaKota parties for 
4.000 sheep for Duluths consumption. 
Twenty double-deck cars will be re- 
quired for their transportation. 

•••A meeting to organize a baseball 
club for Duluth will be held at the 
Spalding on Oct. 26. John S. Barnes, 
the St. Paul manager, will move to 
I>uluth and will be reiwiy to take an 
active financial part In the formation 
of the club. 



•••The first sale of seats for the 
opening of the Temple opera house 
took place in the Spalding lobby last 
night. A. C. Batchelor acting as auc- 
tioneer. F. H Frisbee paid $50 for 
first choice of the boxes. Otliers who 
boui^ht boxes were J. H. James. Frank 
A. Day. Kdward Ilobbins. C. A. Long 
and Mrs. Howe. 



BKN HARD 




No* 2* 



BY SAVOYARD 



ington and entered his appearance for 
Vick. the partv defeated in the court 
below. J. J. Crittenden, who repre- 
sented Prentiss, wrote his client to 
hasten to Wa.shington. but he did not 
come, and Hardin gained the case. 

Certain it is that there was such a 
case; certain it i* that Prentiss gained 
it in the Inferior court; certain it is 
that the case was reversed in the su- 
preme court; certain It Is that the 



decision beggared Prentiss, who went 
to New Orleans to recoup Ws fortunes, 
where he soon died. 

• • • 
shall not say anything of the quar- 
between Hardin and Owsley. A man 



I 

rel 



to know anything about 
Hardin's speech, perhaps 
effort ever delivered in 
controversy. Nor shall 



it must read 
the greatest 
a personal 
I refer i 



Hardin's grandest service to Ken- 



tucky, the Constitution of 1849; that is 
his work, and in my not altogether 
humble opinion. It is the best constitu- 
tion any state of the Union ever had. 

The man, Ben Hardin, stood for in- 
tellectual strength, and his mind had 
all of the massivenesB to be seen in a 
grand old Gothic structure, and yet 
he conld make his speech as radiant 
as the May morn, as splendid as an 
October sunrise. 




There were hard times In Kentucky 
the period 1818-28. The legislature 
chartered a swarm of wildcat banks, 
and the commonwealth was Hooded 
Willi a lot of worthless paper money. 
As always, and Inevitably follows, toon 
get in debt when cheap money is 
afioat. A day of liquidation came, and 
tiiiw-s were hard. Livestock and farm 
crops- could not be sold at all. but 
creditors pressed the men who owed 
them for their debts. Of course, there 
were more people who owed than cred- 
itors, and they elected a legislature 
that enacted stay laws, such as ex- 
tending the period of replevin, that 
amounted to a practical repudiation, 
oi a bankrupt law. 

But John Boyle was chief justice of 
Kentucky, and associated with him 
on that bench were William Owsley 
an! Benjamin Mills. They were old- 
rashioned folk who believed that the 
way to get out of debt was to pay 
cut and so they declared the "relief 
law'." which made debts uncollectable, 
unconstitutional. Then pandemonium 
broke loose, and Kentucky was a 
seething cauldron of politics. The 're- 
lief men had a majority and they suc- 
ceeded in electing Joseph Desha gov- 
crnor over Christopher Tompkins, and 
thev had a majority, happily less than 
two-thirds, in both branches of the 

legislature. 

* • • 
An cxtraordinarv man. John Rowan, 
was the leader of the "relief" party, 
and associated with him were William 
T. Barnev. Chancellor Bibb, and Solo- 
mon P. Sharp. On the other side were 
Ben Hardin. Ben Chapese. George Rob- 
ertson. Daniel Breck. Joseph R Un- 
derwood and James .Simpson. The en- 
tire commonwealth was In an uproar. 
Tiie relief party could not successfully 
Impeach nor "instruct" the judges off 
the bench, but they enacted a new law. 
creating a new tribunal, the supreme 
bench of Kentucky, and the governor 
appointed the judges. There was a 
disputed authority, and for some years 
father was arrayed against son. and 
brother against brother. Ultimately 
common sense prevailed. and Ben 
Hardin, the greatest of the "Old Court" 
champions did more than any one else 
to bring about the result. When you 
read his speech you will say lie was 
greater than Robertson, but when you 
read Robertson you will say he was 
greater tiian Hardin, and you meet 



white 
turned 
speecii 
every- 
thlngs. 

Helm's 



which I 
and Se- 
16 to 1 
and an- 
the old 



of that infall- 
whlch he was 



with the like difficulty in deciding be- 
tween Fielding and Smollett, Dickens 
and "Thackeray. 

Kentucky has g'one through four tre- 
mendous political travails — the old 
court and the new court, of 
have just spoken, the Union 
cession of 1861. the Brayan 
campaign of 1S96. and Goebel 
ti-Goebel In 1«99. Of these, 
court and the new court controversy 
was as fierce as tlie fiercest. 
• • • 
When Ben Hardin was a very young 
lawyer at Elizabethtown. one Bray, 
cliarged with murder, employed liim to 
defend, but complained of tlie fee of 
$300. with the remark that he "could 
get a Bardstown lawyer for that." 
Hardin went to his home and said. 
••Betsy, pack up. We are going to 
move to Bardstown." and within a 
week tliey were located In tliat, then 
the Athens of the then West. It was 
only an e.xempliftcation 
ible Common sense with 
so prodigally endowed. 

In his first important case at Bards- 
town a man named May was liis client, 
and the suit involved the title to a very 
large and very valuable body of land. 
Hardin was alone on his side, while the 
adversary liad retained th.e very cream 
of the bar. tlien the ablest the other 
side of the Allegheny mountains. He 
scarcely ate or slept until the case 
was tried and determined. He gained 
a complete victoiy. and from that day 
he was in the front rank of the elite 
of Kentucky lawyers. Little tells ar 
amusing story that while Hardin wa& 
on his way to tell of his victory to his 
wife lie was anticipated by two friends, 
and thus he could not answer, with 
the great tragedian, Kean, "By God, 
Mary, the pit rose to mel" 

When Ben Hardin, tlien 24, took up 
his residence at Bardstown he found 
John Rowan. Felix Grundy. William 
P. Duval. Charles A. Wickliff, Ben 
Chapese and John Hayes, the la.st 
named, so tradition has it, the great- 
est orator our countrj' has produced 
since Patrick Henry, above Marshall, 
above Menifee, or Prentiss, Brecken- 
ridge, Choate or Brady. He was a stu- 
dent in the office of Judge Rowan, and 
lived In his family, but when he asked 
the i»ruud and haughty old patrician 
for leave to become a suitor for the 
hand of his daughter he met with scorn 
and contumely, and, transcendent gen- 
ius that he was. notwithstanding it 
made a wreck of him, thougli there 
is little doubt that had he been able 
to restrain his appetite for drink, never 
developed till Rowan contemptuously 
denied him his daughter's hand, he 
would have developed into as great a 
lawyer as he certainly was an advo- 
cate and an orator. 

James Guthrie was another member 
of the Bardstown bar of that early 
day. and soon thereafter came Joseph 
Holt, worthy any man's steel at the 
bar. on the hustings, or as a pam- 
phleteer. Guthrie was the author of 
the Louisville & Nashville railroad — 
he had now moved to Louisville, where 
he amassed the biggest fortune any 
Kentuckian of his generation had ever 
acquired, .^nd when Ben Hardin, who 
has as cordial and as wholesome a 
hatred of taxes as John Randolph of 
Rorroke himself, took the stump and 
defeated the subscription of Nelson 
county to the enterprise. Guthrie lo- 
c.ated the road eleven miles west of 
Bardstown, and thu.«« it passed through 
Kltzabethtown. Munfordville and Bowl- 
ing Green. It made It a longer and 
much more crooked line, and It is a 
more or less notable fact that Guthrie 
made John L. Helm, afterward gov- 
ernor, president of the road, and he 
had married Ben Hardin's daughter. 
* • • 

When quite a young man. Hardin at- 
tained to the highest rank of the bar, 
not only of Kentucky, but of the en- 
tire republic. His arguments before 
the supreme court at Washingtpn com- 
pared favorablv with those of the gi- 
ants of those days. PInckney. Web- 
ster. Jeremiah Mason. Clay. Harper. 
Martin or any of the rest. 

Harden owed nlmost as much to his 
wit. humor and sarcasm as he did to 
his learning, his logic t.nd nis capacity 
of a consummate actor. In Bynum vs. 
WIntersmllh he was opposed by his 
son-in-law. Helm. The plaintiff, a Yan- 
kee has sold the defendant, a Ken- 



tuckian, some silkworms and 
mulberry trees. It seems they 
out to be worthless, and in his 
to Uie jury, Hardin convulsed 
body in a tirade against new 
tie closed with this: 

"The last time 1 was at Mr. 
house, my little grandson, Hardin (sub- 
sequently a brother-in-law of Abraham 
Lincoln, and killed at the head of the 
Orphan Brigade of the Confederate 
army at Chickaniauga), ^aid to me, 
'Grandpa, liave you seen our new Berk- 
shire hogs?" I told him I had not. He 
insisted on taking me to see them. It 
was Just at feeding lime. Helm's negro 
man Vincent was administering to 
them cooked mush witli a silver spoon. 
• • « 
Aaron Harding of Green county was 
pretty nearly as good a lawyer as Ben 
Hardin. One day they were on oppos- 
ing sides in a hotly-contested case. 
Harding was a dyspeptic, perpetually 
In physical pain, and the fact gave 
sepulchral solemnity to his tone of 
voice. Hardin. In closing his speecli 
to the jtiry, aid that he had met in 
contention at the bar some of the 
greatest lawyers of America, and had 
survived every conflict, but he was un- 
certain if he would outlive this case, as 
it was the first time he had ever met 
an adversary from the other world. 

It would be easy to fill a page of a 
newspaper with stories of this old 
Ajax of an advocate like this: 

A wealthy landlord had sued out a 
distress warrant for $2.25 balance of 
rent due him by a poor widow, and had 
levied on and sold her last horse and 
milch cow for that amount. She em- 
ployed "Old Ben" Hardin, who brought 
suit for ?500 for excessive levy. Clos- 
ing his speech to the jury, made up 
perhaps, of members of the Baptist 
church, he said: "It is fortunate, 
gentlemen of the jury, very fortunate 
for mankind, that this grasping land- 
lord did not live in the time of Herod. 
If he had. I do not doubt but that he 
would have sent out a distress 
warrant against Joseph and Mary, and 
levied on the ass that bore them 
Egypt, and thus have caused the 
faiit Savior to -fall into the hands 
that bloody tetrarch," 

The old fellow had learning and 
knew precisely what use to make 
it. All history and all literature 
at his instant command, and he 
draw an apt illustration 
circumstance related la 



to 

in- 

of 



he 
of 
w.as 
could 
from any old 
history, pre- 



served 
poetry. 



in 



fiction, or embalmed In 



Mercer 
came off 



In 1838 Edward Wilkinson of Mis- 
sissippi, a prominent lawyer, who had 
been a judge In that state, went to 
Kentueky to be married to Miss Eliza 
Crozier of Bardstown. A tailor of 
Louisville made his wedding suit, and 
there was a quarrel and a fight over 
the fit of the main garment that subse- 
quently resulted in an affray at the 
Gait house, in which two of the tail- 
or's friends lost their lives at. the 
nands of Wilkinson and his two com- 
panions. There was great excitenient. 
The famous Prentiss came from Mis- 
sissippi to defend "his friends, and John 
Rowan was associated with Prentiss, 
and with them were four or five other 
liist-class lawyers. Including the great 
John B. Thompson. 

It was a noted trial, the most cele- 
brated murder case In the hi.story of 
Kentucky. By act of the legislature 
a change of venue was had to 
countv and the ultimate trial 
at Harrodsburg. where public opinion 
was strong in behalf of the accused, 
and they were acquitted. 
♦ • • 

It was Hardins greatest speech, that 
trial and he and Prentiss were pitted 
against each other; and of the two the 
great Dr. John C. Young, then presi- 
dent of Center college, as competent 
a judge of discussion as ever listened 
to an argument, said. "Prentiss was 
the tinsel; Hardin the bullion. No- 

body need undertake to describe the 
speech of Hardin. It must be read to 
appreciate it, and in the report of it 
we lose all the acting of it. Suffice it 
to say he was caustic toward Prentiss, 
and scored to the quick the defendants, 
whom he denounced as "bowie-knife 
»;entrv. these pistol men in private 

life' ' 

I was told a sequel to the trial by a 
distinguished public man of Kentucky: 
bu? as Little does not relate it. I am 
led to suspect that it is apocryphal. It 

wa.s this: ,., ,. 

Some years later Hardin was at 
Jackson "Miss., to try a lawsuit, and 
while there he was invited bv a com- 
mittee of the legislature, then in ses- 
sion to deliver an address on national 
politics. Prentiss heard of It an<l 
ha.stened to Jackson, where he induced 
the committee to cancel the Invita- 
tion a verv ungentlemanly thing to 
do by the way. but Hardin had been 
terrific against him and his clients at 
Harrodsburg. I will here say that 
Hardin got even with that town and 
Mercer county for the hooting they 
gave him when. 

"Weel mounted on his gray mare, Meg. 
A better never lifted leg." 
he reined her up and said: "111 see 
that John Helm and Ben Palmer run 
a stake and ridered fence between this 
town and Danville." And so it hap- 
pened Helm and Palmer. both 
sons-in-law of Hardin, were both 
members of the legislature, created the 
county of Bovle. and took the cream 
of it from Mercer county. That new 
county part is authentic. 
• « « 

Well, old Ben rode over to Vicks- 
burg from Jackson after the Indignity 
was put on him, and he knew from 
whose quiver the shaft came. He put 
up at the leading tavern to await the 
arrival of the steamboat on which he 
could take passage to Louisville. 
There he saw a legal record in the 
reading room, and lawyer like he 
picked it up and began to peruse it. 
and got thoroughly absorbed in it. 

The landlord found him so en- 
gaged, and asked him if he was a law- 
yer The answer was, "I'm Ben Har- 
din' of Kentucky." When he had fin- 
ished reading the record, the landlord 
said that all he had in the world was 
involved in that suit, and asked what 
Hardin thought of It. Old Ben an- 
swered that a lawsuit was always un- 
certain, but he thought the man had 
a good cose. Thereupon he was en- 
gaged and the suit was about the title 
to the' most of the town of Vlcksburg. 
Prentiss was the main party in inter- 
est on the other side. 

« « * 

Old Ben promptly appeared in W'ash- 



THE SILVER HORDE. By Rex Beach, 
author of "The Spoilers" and "The 
Barrier." New York: Harper & Bros. 
$1.50. 

Don't miss it. if you enjoy just 
plain good story. Those who expect it 
to be good because the author's oiher 
stories are good will not be disap- 
pointed. Rex Beach has a deserved 
reputation, which this tale will in- 
crease, of providing good, swinging 
stories, with go In every page and full 
of virile human beings who convince 
and attract; human beings with red 
blood and live, surging passions. More- 
over, there is no dreary preliminary, no 
vvordv test of patience at tlie begin- 
ning; the story just begins and sweeps 
ahead. This is another romance of 
Alaska, where storms and human pas- 
sions are wild and fearful; il is a stir- 
ring tale of Chicago, of Seattle and of 
Kalvik. Emerson Boyd, the good stuff 
in him all but crushed by repeated 
failures. Is stirred Into life by Cherry 
Malotte— the Clierry of "The Spoilers 
— and faces a task as terrible as that 
of Hugo's toiler of the sea. Cherry 
induces him to engage in the salmon 
trade, though ihls means fighting al- 
most single-handed against the re- 
morseless power of the salmon trust. 
Making up his mind thus to venture 
his fortunes. Emerson starts out across 
a deadly winter pass, where death 
lurks in every canyon and hisses In 
every blast; across fifty mlies of wild 
winter waters in a crazy native canoe 
— all this just as a prelude. To find 
that the father of the girl back East 
for whose sake he Is seeking fortune 
is associated with the salmon trust, 
and that Willis Marsh, the brutal and 
relentless head of the trust, is a suitor 
for the same girl, is dismaying, but 
not discouraging. The trust, with 
fiendish Ingenuity, puts every ob.siacle 
In the way of Emerson and his faith- 
ful associates, thus developing a series 
of exciting ativentures tlirough which 
they have to figlit their way heroically, 
li is a real fight, and one well worth 
reading about. Incidentally, there is a 
vivid description of the rush of the 
salmon to their breeding places — the 
"silver horde." Very engaging are the 
very real people in this book. Brave 
Cherry Malotte. child of the rough min- 
ing camps but pure and faithful of 
heart, contrasts appeallngly with the 
pale affections and luxury-bred preju- 
dices of the girl back East, and her 
stalwart personality and courage In her 
fight against the salmon trust in a 
lonely region where its might is the 
only "law are very appealing. She loves 
Emerson, even though she knows about 
the girl back East, and helps him in his 
attempt to win her, though how the 
love theme comes out had best be left 
to the story Itself to tell. Whimsical 
"Fingerless" Fraser. whose real name 
is Switzer. but who has a new name 
to give to anybody who will listen to 
his lantasiic tales about himself, is a 
rich comedy character. Quaintly gar- 
rulous and breezy, full of keen wit 
and pleasant humor, though he is a 
delightful liar and an engaging ci;ook 
there is a real man and a faithtui 
heart under his assumed exterior, and 
In many ways he is the most interest- 
ing personage in the story. There 
more humor in this book than in 
Beach's previous stories, and it 
good wholesome fun. Alton C.iyde, 
the amiable little Insect of a clubman 
whose inefficiency and too loose tongue 
help make a good deal of the trouble. 
Is vividlv drawn; so are several other 
verv interesting people in the story. 
The"re isn't a dull page In the book, it 
Isn't great literature, and may be in 
spots it is slightly overdrawn: but It 
Is uncommonly good reading. 

♦ • * 
DAPHNE IN FITZROY STREET. By 
E Nesbit. author of "The Incom- 
plete Amorist." "The Wouldbegoods. 
"The Enchanted Castle, etc. New- 
York: Doubleday. Page & Co. $1.50. 
This charming author of tales that 
please both young and old has pro- 
vided another delighttul novel that 
proves beyond question her pleasant 
Capacity to entertain The story 
opens on the eighteenth birthday of 
Daphne Carmichael. whom one of her 
adoring schoolmates describes as the 
dearest, prettiest, cleverest, nicest—. 
This is not inaccurate or overdrawn, 
so far as one may judge, and Mrs. 
Bland has a happy faculty of placing 
her people before us very vividly and 
very appeallngly. Daphne Is an amaz- 
ing little general of Innocent semi- 
narv lawlessness. Engaged In a smug- 
gling enterprise concerning some ma 
terials for a secret feast in honor 
her birthday, she meets a romantic 
voung man in circumstances most un- 
conventional—in the top of a tree, if 



Is 

Mr. 

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you please, where he, the temporary 
English master of a boys' school ad- 
joining Daphne's French convent, 
pounces upon her with precipitous 
lovemaking. Orphaned. Daphne and her 
sister go to live with some hard, harsh 
and hateful relatives, who become so 
thoroughly objectionable by whipping 
Doris and tieing her to lier bed that 
they "elope," and brave the perils of 
London all alone, a delightfully Ir- 
responsible pair of babes in the woods. 
They plunge, with all their innocence, 
into Bohemia, and enjoy it. They have 
Innumerable interesting adventures, 
and almost as many romances, for 
Daphne has a naive catholicity of taste 
about young men. It is all rel ited In the 
piquant and moving style tliat makes 
Mrs. Bland's stories .so admirably di- 
verting. She has made a wide and en- 
trancing field of fancy and humor 
all her own. Also, she has a deft 
touch at striking description. She 
speaks of "a fussy woman with a face 
like the face of a pale horse and 
wrists like the yellow legs of chickens. 
An edging of laburnum in the small 
front garden of the unlovely home 
of Daphne's unpleasant relations 
"looks like a golden wig on a wicked 
old witch." It is a very pleasantly en- 
tertaining story. 

« « • 
THE CASTLE BY THE SEA By H. B. 
Marriott Watson, author of "Hurri- 
cane Island." "The Devils Pulpit." 
etc. Boston: Little, Brown & Co. 
$1.50. 

This author has an unusually happy 
fashion of stringing a good story to- 
gether. His "Hurricane Island" is one 
of the breeziest and most absorbing 
of romances, and "The Castle By the 
Sea" will not disappoint those who 
indulge In expectations bred by the 
tempting title and by previous books 
from the same source. Ttichard Bra- 
bazon rents for the summer a charm- 
ing lonely little castle by the Eng- 
lish channel. Right from the begin- 
ning thing.^ happen — or seem about to 
iiappen. There are soft footr'alls in the 
corridors, which when pursed mysteri- 
ously disappear — ghostlike, but not 
ghosts, though there Is a legendary 
ghost. There is a (jueer ticking In the 
wall. Strangers act oddly and are 
unduly interested in the castle and its 
occupants. There is, too. a quiet, ef- 
ficient butler with an atmosphere of 
mystery .about him. There are strange. 
Hitting shadows on the moonlit lawn; 
many things. Indeed, that lead one to 
expect more to happen ' than does 
happen — for a while. It seems that it 
must be all Imagination, grown out of 
the romantic isolation of the castle 
and its legends of ghosts and smug- 
flers. The maladroit ingenuity of a 
Mr. Toosey in the search for the solu- 
tion of the mystery adds some laugh- 
able comedy. At one time the reader 
becomes quite convinced that he is to 
learn of nothing less commonplace 
than a horde of creditors and writ- 
servers, seeking Sir Gilbert Norroy. 
the impecunious owner of the castle, 
though there seems really too much 
to-do to square with that theory. 
Just as the reader has come to the 
belief that that Is all there is to It, 
and that he has been led to expect 
more only by the romantic habit of 
the author's style, a lower depth of 
mystery is suddenly revealed, and 
wiiat seemed to be merely a pleasant 
comedy is turned into real romance, 
with real adventures and plenty of 
them to keep the interest enthralled 
to the finish, which comes in a climax 
of mishaps in a lide-ftooded cavern. 
with the discovery of a cipher and the 
exjio.sure of a subterannean plot. A 
very readable and very entertaining 
romance. 

• • • 
THE DIAMOND MASTER. By Jacques 
I'Utrclle. Indianapolis: The Bobbs- 
Merrill company, $1. 
Fancy, on opening your mail some 
fine morning, discovering, in a box 
quite unmarked, a splendid diamond. 
Myriad colors i)lay in its blue-white 
depths, sparkling, fiaslrlng. dazzling. 
Naturally, you are astonished. If four 
of your friends should, later in the day, 
confide to you that they had each re- 
ceived, in tlie same way, a stone simi- 
larly splendid, sparkling, dazzling, you 
would feel, so to speak, that something 
was "ui>." In Mr. Futrelle's newest 
story, "The Diamond Master," this Is 
precisely what liappens to Henry 
Latham and four other jewel merchants 
of New York, and somethirg is up, de- 
cldedl.v. to-wit: an absorbing romance. 
A picture puzzle is not more enthralling 
than this story, and the fascination of 
both arises largely from the same fact, 
that, short of tlie end, there is no good 
place at which to stop. Always, until 
it is quite completed, there is another 
space in the picture that one would 
like to fill; always in the story there 
is one more mystery one -would like to 
solve; so one ffoes on breathless till 
the last word Is i>laced. You must go 
on reading to find out how it is pos- 
sible for a young, unknown man 
to corner the world's diamond market; 
who killed old Mr. Kellner. what Czenkl 
had to do with it, and last though not 
least, if Doris and Gene make up. 

Of the heroine you cannot complain, 
since, even in the eyes of tiie cabby who 
drives her on her mysterious trip up 
Fifth avenue, she is "a pippin, a peach- 
erino. a beauty brigiit." But the unique 
feature of the plot is tl.i' astounding 
number of diamonds — each one mor- 
perfect than the Koh-i-noor — which E. 
Van Cortlandt Wynne produces, and the 
pressing question is. where does he get 
them"? 

« * • 

PRISCILLA OF THE GOOD INTENT. 
By Halliwell Sutclifle. Boston: Lit- 
tle, Brown & Co. $1.50. 
The setting of this impressive story 
of English ncrth country life is a small 
moorland village; and the central 
theme Is the growth of pleasure-lov- 
ing Reuben Gaunt from a careless 
youngster into a man of self-reliance 
and character. It is a genuine drama 
of human Impulses, with a Vove episode 
of real charm. Reuben Giunt, tlvough 
far from appealing at first, slowly wins 
tlie reader's sympathy by his self-de- 
nial and manly effort, and Prlscllla. the 
heroine. is charmingly portrayed; 
while David the Smith. Billy the Fool 
and other villagers lend humor, pathos 
and humanity to the story. The types 
.are pleasantly pictured, and the quiet 
humor of quaint characters is attrac- 
tively developed. 

• • • 

TALES OF WONDER. Edited by Kate 
Douglas Wiggin and Nora Archibald 
Smith. New York: Doubleday, Page 
& Cc. $1.50. 

This handsome volume is the fourth 
fairy oook in the "Children's Crimson 
Classics.' The world's besit fairy tales 
have gone Into the making of the 
series, and the present volume is fully 
up to the standard set by its prede- 
cessors. All times and all climes con- 
tribute Europe furnishes tales from 
the Scandinavian, Gaelic, Celtic, Ger- 
man, Dalmatian. English, Russian, 
French lortuguese and Spanish. Asia 
contributes stories from the Chinese, 
Indian, Japanese and Persian. America 
provides several stories from the folk 
tales of the American Indians. The 
tales are both ancient and modern, from 
stories handed down from before the 
births of books down to Seumas Mac- 



Manus. They show how universal are 
the themes that appeal to childish im- 
aginations. The translations are In- 
terestingly done. The volume is designed 
as a giftbook. and an appreciated gift 
It will prove to tiie young people for 
whom these tales have been spun dur- 
ing the ages. 

• * * 

rHE THIN SANTA CLAUS. By Ellis 
Parker Butler, author of "Pigs Is 
Pigs." New York: Doubleday, I'ag'e 
& Co. 50 cents. 

Mrs. Giatz, a fat and placidly comfort- 
able widow with a home and money In 
the bank, awakes one Christmas morn- 
ing to find her chicken coop rifled, but 
her idea about the kind of Santa Claus 
tiiat has visited her in the night is 
changed by the discovery of a purse 
containing $900, which the thief has 
evidently dropped. Thereafter, sh.=; 
receives a strange guest, who ex- 
presses the keenest ambition to ex- 
amine her chicken yard; first as a 
buyer ol chickens, offering very fancy 
prices, next as a city chicken hou.se in- 
spector, and lastly as a detective look- 
ing for "clues." The ingenious argu- 
ments of the "thin Santa Claus and 
the ingenuous retorts of Mrs. Gratz 
make up a very funny story. 



other people, and the causes that have 
made the American the energetic, en- 
terprising, active man that he is. In 
A, Maurice Low'c forthcoming book on 
"The American People" (Houghton- 
Mifflin company) those reasons are ex- 
plained. The working of the American 
mind is shown. To be told, for in- 
stance, that American character has 
been inftuenced by the Indian, or that 
one reason why we are different from 
Europeans is because of our "cold 
waves," will be a surprise to most 
Americans, yet this shows the careful 
methods of the author In ascertaining 
why the American mind is unlike that 
of any other people 

* • « 
Doubleday, Page & Co. have estab- 
lished a new department for import- 
ing artistic mezzogravure reproduc- 
tions of great paintings. They have 
made up, under the title of the "Ideal 
Collection bf the World's Great Art," 
a selection of sixty celebrated ma.-ster- 
pieces of the world's greatest paintings, 
dating from the earliest period of the 
Renaissance. A chart of the world's 
art, which accompanies this collection, 
ghes a concise view of the great art 
schools from earliest to modern times. 
Another important series of reproduc- 
tions is The Burlington Proofs, meas- 
uring approximately 34 by 26 inches 
The Ideals are for the den or study 
table. The Burlington Proofs are fo/ 
the walls of the home. 



The 

'Little 

inimi- 

contributes his 

attractive collec- 

worth the price 



author, who began the series of 
Comic Masterpieces" with the 
table "Pigs Is Pigs.' 
fifth volume to this 
tion. and it is well 

of admission. 

• * * 

THE STAR-GAZER'S HANDBOOK. By 
Henry W. Elson. Ph. D. New York: 
Sturgis & Walton company. jO 

cents net. , , ^„y\~,,'r. 

The return engagement of Hauey s 
comet, with Its promise of &pectaculai 
evening entertainments for a long 
time. Is certain to lead to a revival of 
popular interest in astronomy. 11. 
when the astronomers announce that 
the comet Is faintly visible